The Nebuly Coat

A book by John Meade Falkner.

[ More ParallelTexts | Source language: Japanese | Target language: English ]
The verbs of this paralleltext are marked as links.

プロローグ ~~~
PROLOGUE.
鉄道駅舎、教育施設、教会堂を建造、著述家にて古美術商、さらにファークワー・アンド・ファークワー商会の共同経営者であるジョージ・ファークワー准男爵は、自分のことばに重みを持たせようと、事務室の椅子にそり返り、くるりと横をむいた。彼の前にはカラン大聖堂の修復工事に監督として送られる部下が立った。
Sir George Farquhar, Baronet, builder of railway-stations, and institutes, and churches, author, antiquarian, and senior partner of Farquhar and Farquhar, leant back in his office chair and turned it sideways to give more point to his remarks. Before him stood an understudy, whom he was sending to superintend the restoration work at Cullerne Minster.
「それじゃ、行ったまえ、ウエストレイ。充分気をつけるんだよ。きみが取り組むのは重要な仕事だということを忘れるな。教会もあそこまで大きくなるとさすがに『その光り、升の下に隠るることなし』(註 マタイ伝から)だ。この国家遺産保存協会とやらは、うちの会社をだしにて自分たちの存在を宣伝しようといるらしい。アンブリ(聖器棚)とアバクス(頂板)の違いもわからぬ無知蒙昧の輩、ペテン師ども、流行を追うだけのど素人が。あの連中はきっとわれわれの仕事にけちをつけくる。出来映えがよかろうが、悪かろうが、並だろうが、彼らにとっては同じなんだよ。とにかくけちをつけようと身構えいるんだ」
"Well, good-bye, Westray; keep your eyes open, and don't forget that you have an important job before you. The church is too big to hide its light under a bushel, and this Society-for-the-Conservation-of-National-Inheritances has made up its mind to advertise itself at our expense. Ignoramuses who don't know an aumbry from an abacus, charlatans, amateur faddists, they _will_ abuse our work. Good, bad, or indifferent, it's all one to them; they are pledged to abuse it."
その声は専門家としての強い軽蔑に満ちたが、気を静めると、仕事の話に戻った。
His voice rang with a fine professional contempt, but he sobered himself and came back to business.
「南袖廊の屋根と聖歌隊席の穹窿天井には細心の注意が必要だ。中央塔にも以前から問題があって、交差部のかなめの基柱は補強工事をたいのだが、何しろ費用がない。中央塔のことは黙っいることにた。なだめるすべもないのに、いたずらに疑いを抱かせるのは意味がないからな。今やっくれいわれているのは取る足りない作業だが、それだけでもどうやって予算のやりくりをたらいいのやら。資金繰りのめどがついたら塔に手をつけよう。しかし袖廊と聖歌隊席の穹窿天井は急を要する。鐘は心配ないでいい。鐘枠にがたがて、もう何年も鳴らされてないんだ。
"The south transept roof and the choir vaulting will want careful watching. There is some old trouble, too, in the central tower; and I should like later on to underpin the main crossing piers, but there is no money. For the moment I have said nothing about the tower; it is no use raising doubts that one can't set at rest; and I don't know how we are going to make ends meet, even with the little that it is proposed to do now. If funds come in, we must tackle the tower; but transept and choir-vaults are more pressing, and there is no risk from the bells, because the cage is so rotten that they haven't been rung for years.
精一杯できるかぎりのことをたまえ。金銭的にはあまり恵まれたお勤めとは言えないが、最善をつくすことだ。会社に利益なんか一銭もありない。しかしあの聖堂は有名だから、いい加減な仕事はできないよ。主任司祭には手紙を書いおいた。愚劣な男で、カラン大聖堂の管理には、貴婦人の小間使いなみにむいないのだが、とにかく彼にはきみが明日到着すること、もしも先方がきみに会いたいと言うなら、午後聖堂に顔を出すということを伝えある。浅はかなやつだが、あそこの法定管理者だし、修復費用調達にあずかってなかなか力があったからね。やむを得んが我慢しよう」
"You must do your best. It isn't a very profitable stewardship, so try to give as good an account of it as you can. We shan't make a penny out of it, but the church is too well known to play fast-and-loose with. I have written to the parson--a foolish old fellow, who is no more fit than a lady's-maid to be trusted with such a church as Cullerne--to say you are coming to-morrow, and will put in an appearance at the church in the afternoon, in case he wishes to see you. The man is an ass, but he is legal guardian of the place, and has not done badly in collecting money for the restoration; so we must bear with him."
第一章 ~~~
CHAPTER ONE.
英国陸地測量部制作の地図ではカラン・ウォーフ、地元の人には単にカランと呼ばれている場所は、今でこそ海岸線から二マイルほど内陸部にあるが、かつてはもっと海寄りで、無敵艦隊との戦いに六隻の船を送り、その一世紀後にはオランダの攻撃を迎え撃つため四隻の船を送り出した由緒ある港として歴史に輝かしい名を残しいる。ところがやがてカル川の河口域は沈泥でふさがって港口には砂州ができ、海上貿易の船は他に港を探さざるをなくなった。その後、カル川の流れはやせ細り、それまでのようにあちらこちらへ縦横に伸びるかわりに身を縮めておとなしい河川に変貌、しかも河川としても決して大きいほうの部類ではなかった。市民たちは港で生計が立てられないことを見て取ると、塩沢を埋め立てることでなにがしかの代償がられるかも知れないと考え、海水を防ぐために石の堤防を築き、その真ん中にカル川の流れを海に放出する水路を造った。こうしてカラン・フラットと呼ばれる低地の牧草地ができあがり、自由市民はここで羊を放牧する権利を持ち、海峡のむこう、フランスのプレサレ羊にも負けない美味なマトンを生産するようになった。しかし海は無抵抗にその権利を明け渡したわけではない。南東風や大潮と共に波はときどき堤防を乗り越え、またときにはカル川がお行儀よく振る舞うことを忘れ、内陸部に大雨があったあとなど、昔日のごとく、あらゆる拘束を断ち切っ暴れた。そんなとき、上の階の窓からカランの町を眺めた人々は、誰もがこの小さな場所が再び海岸線の方に移動たのではないかと考えた。牧草地は水浸しで、堤防は内陸の湖とそのむこうの海との境界線として、目につくほど幅が広くなかったのである。
Cullerne Wharf of the Ordnance maps, or plain Cullerne as known to the countryside, lies two miles from the coast to-day; but it was once much nearer, and figures in history as a seaport of repute, having sent six ships to fight the Armada, and four to withstand the Dutch a century later. But in fulness of time the estuary of the Cull silted up, and a bar formed at the harbour mouth; so that sea-borne commerce was driven to seek other havens. Then the Cull narrowed its channel, and instead of spreading itself out prodigally as heretofore on this side or on that, shrunk to the limits of a well-ordered stream, and this none of the greatest. The burghers, seeing that their livelihood in the port was gone, reflected that they might yet save something by reclaiming the salt-marshes, and built a stone dyke to keep the sea from getting in, with a sluice in the midst of it to let the Cull out. Thus were formed the low-lying meadows called Cullerne Flat, where the Freemen have a right to pasture sheep, and where as good-tasting mutton is bred as on any _pre-sale_ on the other side of the Channel. But the sea has not given up its rights without a struggle, for with a south-east wind and spring-tide the waves beat sometimes over the top of the dyke; and sometimes the Cull forgets its good behaviour, and after heavy rainfalls inland breaks all bonds, as in the days of yore. Then anyone looking out from upper windows in Cullerne town would think the little place had moved back once more to the seaboard; for the meadows are under water, and the line of the dyke is scarcely broad enough to make a division in the view, between the inland lake and the open sea beyond.
グレート・サザン鉄道の幹線はこの見捨てられた港の北七マイルのところを走って、外部との交通は長年、運送屋の二輪馬車が町と鄙びたカラン街道駅とを往復することで保たれてた。しかしやがてこの古い自治都市から選出れた議員、有能で広く信望を集めたサー・ジョゼフ・カルーがカラン自治体代表団を正式に組織て、交通の便をいっそう改善する必要ありと鉄道会社を説得、支線が敷設れることになった。ただしその利便性は過去の運送屋と比べてほとんどかわりばえのないお粗末なものだった。
The main line of the Great Southern Railway passes seven miles to the north of this derelict port, and converse with the outer world was kept up for many years by carriers' carts, which journeyed to and fro between the town and the wayside station of Cullerne Road. But by-and-by deputations of the Corporation of Cullerne, properly introduced by Sir Joseph Carew, the talented and widely-respected member for that ancient borough, persuaded the railway company that better communication was needed, and a branch-line was made, on which the service was scarcely less primitive than that of the carriers in the past.
聖堂の修復工事がファークワー・アンド・ファークワー商会に委託れた当時、鉄道の物珍しさはまだ消えおらず、汽車が到着するとカランの町をぶらつく人が毎日儀式のように集まった。しかしウエストレイがやってきた午後は雨が激しく降り、見物人は一人もなかった。彼はロンドンからカラン街道駅まで三等車券を買って旅費を節約、乗換駅からカランまでは一等車券を買って会社の威厳を保とうとた。だがそんな用心は取り越し苦労に終わった。数名の年老いた駅員が養老院に送られるようにカラン駅に配属れているだけで、他に彼の到着を目撃するものはまったくなかったのである。
The novelty of the railway had not altogether worn off at the time when the restorations of the church were entrusted to Messrs. Farquhar and Farquhar; and the arrival of the trains was still attended by Cullerne loungers as a daily ceremonial. But the afternoon on which Westray came, was so very wet that there were no spectators. He had taken a third-class ticket from London to Cullerne Road to spare his pocket, and a first-class ticket from the junction to Cullerne to support the dignity of his firm. But this forethought was wasted, for, except certain broken-down railway officials, who were drafted to Cullerne as to an asylum, there were no witnesses of his advent.
彼はブランダマー・アームズという家族むけ、および商人むけのホテルが、汽車の到着に合わせて乗合馬車を運行いることを知り喜んだ。聖堂のちょうど入り口前で降ろしてくれるいうから、なおのこと好都合とこの乗り物を利用することにた。彼はささやかな荷物を中に運びこむと――乗客は彼一人だったから余裕はたっぷりあった――床を覆う藁に足を突っこみ、十分間というもの、砂利道を走る馬車でなければ味わえないがたがたという振動に耐えた。
He was glad to learn that the enterprise of the Blandamer Arms led that family and commercial hotel to send an omnibus to meet all trains, and he availed himself the more willingly of this conveyance because he found that it would set him down at the very door of the church itself. So he put himself and his modest luggage inside--and there was ample room to do this, for he was the only passenger--plunged his feet into the straw which covered the floor, and endured for ten minutes such a shaking and rattling as only an omnibus moving over cobble-stones can produce.
ウエストレイはカラン大聖堂の見取り図をすべて完全に頭に入れたものの、実物はまだたことがなかった。乗合馬車がけたたましい音を立てて市場の中に駆けこみ、四角い広場の南側全面を覆いつくすように聳え立つ聖セパルカ大聖堂をはじめてたとき、彼は感嘆の声を抑えることができなかった。篠つく雨が通りから歩行者を追い払い、降ろした緑のブラインド越しに乗合馬車の通過をのぞき見る幾人かのピーピング・トムをのぞけば、市場はまるでレディ・ゴダイヴァの行進を待っいるかのように少しも人気がなかった。
With the plans of Cullerne Minster Mr Westray was thoroughly familiar, but the reality was as yet unknown to him; and when the omnibus lumbered into the market-place, he could not suppress an exclamation as he first caught sight of the great church of Saint Sepulchre shutting in the whole south side of the square. The drenching rain had cleared the streets of passengers, and save for some peeping-Toms who looked over the low green blinds as the omnibus passed, the place might indeed have been waiting for Lady Godiva's progress, all was so deserted.
沛然と降る雨、屋根の上に砕け散り霧のように広がるしぶき、地面から立ち昇る水蒸気、それらがあらゆるものに目に見えない、けれどもそれと分かるヴェールを被せ、舞台に用いられる紗幕のように輪郭をぼやけさせた。それを通して浮かび上がる大聖堂は、ウエストレイが想像の中で思い描いたどんな姿よりも遥かに神秘的で荘厳だった。馬車はすぐに鉄の門の前に停まった。そこから境内を抜けて北側ポーチまで板石敷きの小道がついた。 ~~~ 御者がドアを開けた。
The heavy sheets of rain in the air, the misty water-dust raised by the drops as they struck the roofs, and the vapour steaming from the earth, drew over everything a veil invisible yet visible, which softened outlines like the gauze curtain in a theatre. Through it loomed the Minster, larger and far more mysteriously impressive than Westray had in any moods imagined. A moment later the omnibus drew up before an iron gate, from which a flagged pathway led through the churchyard to the north porch.
「ここが聖堂です」と彼は言わずもがなのことを言った。「ここで降りるんでしたら、荷物はホテルにお届けおきます」
The conductor opened the carriage-door.
ウエストレイは帽子を深くかぶると、外套の襟を立て、入り口めがけて雨の中に飛び出した。小道に敷かれた墓石のくぼみに深い水たまりができて、急いた彼はポーチに着くまでに服に水を撥ね散らかししまった。巨大な扉口にくぐり戸があり、彼はそこにかかる革の帳《とばり》を横に押しやって聖堂の中に入った。
"This is the church, sir," he said, somewhat superfluously. "If you get out here, I will drive your bag to the hotel."
まだ四時ではなかったが、空は雲に閉ざされ、建物の中はすでに薄暗くなった。聖歌隊席で話をたひとかたまりの男たちが入り口の音に振り返り、建築家にむかっ進んた。領袖格は中年を過ぎた聖職者で、ストックタイを首に巻き、若い建築家のほうに歩み寄ると挨拶をた。 ~~~ 「サー・ジョージ・ファークワーの助手の方ですな。いや、助手のお一人と言い直すべきでしょうね。サー・ジョージは多彩なお仕事をこなすのに、きっとあなた以外にも助手をお使いでしょうから」
Westray fixed his hat firmly on his head, turned up the collar of his coat, and made a dash through the rain for the door. Deep puddles had formed in the worn places of the gravestones that paved the alley, and he splashed himself in his hurry before he reached the shelter of the porch. He pulled aside the hanging leather mattress that covered a wicket in the great door, and found himself inside the church.
ウエストレイは同意を示すように頷き、聖職者は話しつづけた。「自己紹介ますと、わたしは参事会員パーキンと申します。わたしのことはきっとサー・ジョージからお聞きでしょうが、この聖堂の主任司祭として格別のお付き合いをいただいおります。あるときなどサー・ジョージはわたしの家にお泊まりになりましてな。若い方があのように有能な建築家のもとで修業できるというのはまことに誇りに思うべきことですよ。あとで今回の修復工事についてサー・ジョージがお考えになっいることを大まかに、ごく手短に説明ますが、その前に尊敬べき教区民にてわたしの――友人である方々を紹介ましょう」その口調には、どこからても格下なのに、そんな相手を友人扱いするのは、自分を貶めすぎではないかという疑問がいくらかこめられてた。
It was not yet four o'clock, but the day was so overcast that dusk was already falling in the building. A little group of men who had been talking in the choir turned round at the sound of the opening door, and made towards the architect. The protagonist was a clergyman past middle age, who wore a stock, and stepped forward to greet the young architect.
「こちらはミスタ・シャーノール。オルガン奏者で、わたしの指示のもと、礼拝の音楽を演奏ます。こちらはドクタ・エニファー。地元の優秀なお医者さんです。そしてこちらのミスタ・ジョウリフは商売をなさっいるんですが、手の空いたときに教区委員として聖堂管理のお手伝いをいただいます」
"Sir George Farquhar's assistant, I presume. One of Sir George Farquhar's assistants I should perhaps say, for no doubt Sir George has more than one assistant in carrying out his many and varied professional duties."
Westray made a motion of assent, and the clergyman went on: "Let me introduce myself as Canon Parkyn. You will no doubt have heard of me from Sir George, with whom I, as rector of this church, have had exceptional opportunities of associating. On one occasion, indeed, Sir George spent the night under my own roof, and I must say that I think any young man should be proud of studying under an architect of such distinguished ability. I shall be able to explain to you very briefly the main views which Sir George has conceived with regard to the restoration; but in the meantime let me make you known to my worthy parishioners--and friends," he added in a tone which implied some doubt as to whether condescension was not being stretched too far, in qualifying as friends persons so manifestly inferior.
医者とオルガン奏者は紹介を受けて、頷くような、肩をすくめるような仕草をた。それは主任司祭のうぬぼれて尊大ぶった態度に対する侮蔑をあらわし、万が一にも彼らがミスタ・ウエストレイと友達になることがあったとしても、それは決して参事会員パーキンの紹介のおかげではないだろうということを暗に示した。それとは逆にミスタ・ジョウリフは、自分が主任司祭の友人に数え入れられたことの重みを充分に認識たらしく、恭しく一揖ながら丁寧に「何かあればわたしにおっしゃっください」と言い、謙虚に振る舞うすべをわきまえて、これから世に出ようといる若い建築家にいつでも惜しみなく保護の手を差し伸べる用意のあることを明らかにた。
"This is Mr Sharnall, the organist, who under my direction presides over the musical portion of our services; and this is Dr Ennefer, our excellent local practitioner; and this is Mr Joliffe, who, though engaged in trade, finds time as churchwarden to assist me in the supervision of the sacred edifice."
The doctor and the organist gave effect to the presentation by a nod, and something like a shrug of the shoulders, which deprecated the Rector's conceited pomposity, and implied that if such an exceedingly unlikely contingency as their making friends with Mr Westray should ever happen, it would certainly not be due to any introduction of Canon Parkyn. Mr Joliffe, on the other hand, seemed fully to recognise the dignity to which he was called by being numbered among the Rector's friends, and with a gracious bow, and a polite "Your servant, sir," made it plain that he understood how to condescend in his turn, and was prepared to extend his full protection to a young and struggling architect.
こうした主役たちの他にもその場には教会事務員と、通りから聖堂にぶらりと入った数名の通行人役がた。彼らは雨はしのげるし、午後のひとときを無料で楽しく過ごせそうだとご機嫌だった。 ~~~ 「こちらでお会いすることをお望みじゃないかと思ったのですよ」と主任司祭が言った。「さっそくこの建物のひときわ目につく特徴をご指摘て差し上げることができますからな。サー・ジョージ・ファークワーは、この前お出でになった折、わたしの説明を明快だと言ってにこにこながら褒めくださいましたよ」
Beside these leading actors, there were present the clerk, and a handful of walking-gentlemen in the shape of idlers who had strolled in from the street, and who were glad enough to find shelter from the rain, and an afternoon's entertainment gratuitously provided.
すぐに逃れる道はなさそうだったので、ウエストレイは観念、少人数の一団は濡れた外套や傘の匂いとあいまって独特の雰囲気を醸し出しいる身廊を歩き出した。教会の空気はひんやりと冷たく、濡れそぼった敷物の匂いがウエストレイの注意を屋根の雨漏りと床のあちこちにできた水たまりにむけさせた。
"I thought you would like to meet me here," said the Rector, "so that I might point out to you at once the more salient features of the building. Sir George Farquhar, on the occasion of his last visit, was pleased to compliment me on the lucidity of the explanations which I ventured to offer."
There seemed to be no immediate way of escape, so Westray resigned himself to the inevitable, and the little group moved up the nave, enveloped in an atmosphere of its own, of which wet overcoats and umbrellas were resolvable constituents. The air in the church was raw and cold, and a smell of sodden matting drew Westray's attention to the fact that the roofs were not water-tight, and that there were pools of rain-water on the floor in many places.
「身廊がいちばん古いのです」とこの雄弁な案内人は言った。「ウォルター・ル・ベックによって千百三十五年に建てられました」
"The nave is the oldest part," said the cicerone, "built about 1135 by Walter Le Bec."
「われわれのお友達はこの仕事を任せるには若すぎて経験不足じゃないかと、どうも不安でならないのだがね。あなたはどう思う」彼は脇をむいてすばやく医者に尋ねた。
"I am very much afraid our friend is too young and inexperienced for the work here. What do _you_ think?" he put in as a rapid aside to the doctor.
「ああ、あなたが手取り足取り多少指導なされば大丈夫だと思いますよ」医者はそう答えながら眉毛をつり上げて見せてオルガン奏者をにやりとた。
"Oh, I dare say if you take him in hand and coach him a little he will do all right," replied the doctor, raising his eyebrows for the organist's delectation.
「さよう、ここはすべてル・ベックが建てたのです」主任司祭はウエストレイのほうにむき直りながらつづけた。「崇高だと思いませんか、ノルマン様式の簡素さは。身廊のアーケードは吟味する値しますぞ。それに交差部のこの素晴らしいアーチをください。もちろんノルマン様式ですが、なんと軽々といることか。それでいて岩のように頑丈で、後代に架構れた塔の莫大な重量をしっかり支えいる。素晴らしい。実に見事だ」
"Yes, this is all Le Bec's work," the Rector went on, turning back to Westray. "So sublime the simplicity of the Norman style, is it not? The nave arcades will repay your close attention; and look at these wonderful arches in the crossing. Norman, of course, but how light; and yet strong as a rock to bear the enormous weight of the tower which later builders reared on them. Wonderful, wonderful!"
ウエストレイは上司が塔に不安を抱いたことを思い出してランタンを見上げた。すると北側には以前、亀裂に煉瓦を詰めこんだ跡が筋のようについおり、南側にはランタンの窓枠の下から細いぎざぎざの割れ目が稲妻を刻印たかのように走っいるのが見えた。彼は「アーチは決して眠らない」という古い建築の諺を思い出した。四つの大きな美しい半円形を見上げいると、それらがこう言っいるように思われた。
Westray recalled his Chief's doubts about the tower, and looking up into the lantern saw on the north side a seam of old brick filling; and on the south a thin jagged fissure, that ran down from the sill of the lantern-window like the impress of a lightning-flash. There came into his head an old architectural saw, "The arch never sleeps"; and as he looked up at the four wide and finely-drawn semicircles they seemed to say:
「アーチは決して眠らない。決して。彼らはわれわれの上に背負いきれないほどの重荷を載せた。われわれはその重量を分散する。アーチは決して眠らない」
"The arch never sleeps, never sleeps. They have bound on us a burden too heavy to be borne. We are shifting it. The arch never sleeps."
「素晴らしい。実に見事だ!」主任司祭はつぶやきつづけた。「大胆なことをやる連中ですな、ノルマンの建築者たちは」
"Wonderful, wonderful!" the Rector still murmured. "Daring fellows, these Norman builders."
「ええ、そうですね」とウエストレイは応ぜざるをなかった。「しかしこの塔がアーチの上に積み上げられるとは思っなかったでしょう」
"Yes, yes," Westray was constrained to say; "but they never reckoned that the present tower would be piled upon their arches."
「なに、アーチが不安定だってことかね」オルガン奏者が口をはさんだ。「実はわたしもそんな気がたんだよ、何度も」
"What, _you_ think them a little shaky?" put in the organist. "Well, I have fancied so, many a time, myself."
「さあ、それはどうでしょうか。われわれが生きいるあいだは持ちこたえると思いますよ」ウエストレイはさりげなく、安心せるように言った。塔に関してはいらぬ波風を立てるなと特に注意れてたことを思い出したのだ。しかし頭の上を見ると、天に登ろうとたギリシア神話の巨人たちではないけれど、ペーリオン山にオッサ山を積み重ねたような気がならず、交差部の巨大なアーチに対する不信感は拭いようもなかった。
"Oh, I don't know. I dare say they will last our time," Westray answered in a nonchalant and reassuring tone; for he remembered that, as regards the tower, he had been specially cautioned to let sleeping dogs lie, but he thought of the Ossa heaped on Pelion above their heads, and conceived a mistrust of the wide crossing-arches which he never was able entirely to shake off.
「そんなことはありませんよ、あなた」主任司祭はこのとんでもない誤解に寛大な笑みを浮かべ言った。「このアーチなら心配には及びません。ここではじめてお会いたときにサー・ジョージがこうおっしゃったんですよ。『主任司祭さん、カランには四十年お住まいとのことですが、塔が動いたような形跡はありませんでしたか』わたしはこう言い返したんです。『サー・ジョージ、費用の支払いを塔が倒れるまで待っいただけますかな?』はっ、はっ、はっ!冗談がお分かりなったようで、それ以後塔の話はたことがありません。サー・ジョージはきっとあなたに周到な指示をお与えなったのでしょうな。さて、サー・ジョージに聖堂の中を直々に案内て差し上げた栄誉に免じて、どうか南袖廊のほうへお進みただけませんか。サー・ジョージがどこよりも緊急に修復べきとお考えになったところをご覧にいれましょう」
"No, no, my young friend," said the Rector with a smile of forbearance for so mistaken an idea, "do not alarm yourself about these arches. `Mr Rector,' said Sir George to me the very first time we were here together, `you have been at Cullerne forty years; have you ever observed any signs of movement in the tower?' `Sir George,' I said, `will you wait for your fees until my tower tumbles down?' Ha, ha, ha! He saw the joke, and we never heard anything more about the tower. Sir George has, no doubt, given you all proper instructions; but as I had the privilege of personally showing him the church, you must forgive me if I ask you to step into the south transept for a moment, while I point out to you what Sir George considered the most pressing matter."
彼らは袖廊に移動た。その途中で医者がウエストレイを引き留め話しかけてた。
They moved into the transept, but the doctor managed to buttonhole Westray for a moment _en route_.
死ぬほどうんざりする思うよ、あいつの無知とうぬぼれには。あいつの話など聞き流しおけばいい。ただきみには機会がありしだいさっそく頼んおきたいと思ったことがあるんだ。修復工事がどう行われるのか、費用がどれだけ限られているのか知らないが、ともかく床だけは衛生的にくれないか。この石をほじくり返して、その下に一フィートか二フィート、セメントを流しこんくれ。死者が生者に毒を吹きかけるのを放っおくことくらいひどい話もないだろう?この床のすぐ下には何百という墓があるに違いない。それにまわりの水たまりをくれ。非衛生きわまりないじゃないか」
"You will be bored to death," he said, "with this man's ignorance and conceit. Don't pay the least attention to him, but there _is_ one thing I want to take the first opportunity of pressing on you. Whatever is done or not done, however limited the funds may be, let us at least have a sanitary floor. You must have all these stones up, and put a foot or two of concrete under them. Can anything be more monstrous than that the dead should be allowed to poison the living? There must be hundreds of burials close under the floor, and look at the pools of water standing about. Can anything, I say, be more insanitary?"
彼らは南袖廊にて、主任司祭がちょうど屋根の破損を指さしたところだった。それは実際、示されるまでもない有様だった。
They were in the south transept, and the Rector had duly pointed out the dilapidations of the roof, which, in truth, wanted but little showing.
「ここはブランダマー側廊とも呼ばれてます。長年ここに埋葬れてた貴族の一族の名を取りましてね」
"Some call this the Blandamer aisle," he said, "from a noble family of that name who have for many years been buried here."
「彼らの地下納骨所はきっと恐ろしく非衛生的な状態ですよ」医者が口をはさんだ。
"_Their_ vaults are, no doubt, in a most insanitary condition," interpolated the doctor.
「ブランダマー家は聖堂全体の修復を引き受けるべきだよ」オルガン奏者が苦々しく言った。「まともな心ある人間ならそうするだろう。彼らはクロイソス王のように金持ちで、一ポンドをなくしても、普通の人が一ペニーをなくしたときより惜しいとは思わない連中だ。衛生うんぬんという話なんかどうでもいいさ。今のままだって充分用は足りる。床を掘り返したって、黴菌がくるだけだ。建物には手をつけなくてもいい。屋根の雨漏りを直して、オルガンに百ポンドが二百ポンド、金をつぎこんで欲しい。それがわれわれの望んいることだ。ブランダマー家がけちのしわんぼうでなければ、それくらいやっくれてもよさそうなものだが」
"These Blandamers ought to restore the whole place," the organist said bitterly. "They would, if they had any sense of decency. They are as rich as Croesus, and would miss pounds less than most people would miss pennies. Not that I believe in any of this sanitary talk--things have gone on well enough as they are; and if you go digging up the floors you will only dig up pestilences. Keep the fabric together, make the roofs water-tight, and spend a hundred or two on the organ. That is all we want, and these Blandamers would do it, if they weren't curmudgeons and skinflints."
「失礼だがね、ミスタ・シャーノール」と主任司祭が言った。「世襲貴族というのは大切な制度だから、そういう方々の批判はごく慎重になければならないと思うね。でも同時に」彼は弁明するようにウエストレイのほうを振りむい言った。「友人の意見には一抹の真実があるかも知れません。ブランダマー卿が気前よく修復費用を出しくれないかと期待たのですが、今までのところ音沙汰なしです。もっともお返事が遅れいるのはずっと外国にいらっしゃるせいだと思いますがね。卿は昨年おじい様から地位をお継ぎになりました。お亡くなりなった先代はこの聖堂にあまり関心をお持ちではありませんでしたし、実はいろいろな面でひどく変わった性格の持ち主でした。しかしこんなことを蒸し返しても仕方がありませんな。ご老体はお亡くなりなったのですから、お若い御当主からよい知らせがあることを祈るしかありません」
"You will forgive me, Mr Sharnall," said the Rector, "if I remark that an hereditary peerage is so important an institution, that we should be very careful how we criticise any members of it. At the same time," he went on, turning apologetically to Westray, "there is perhaps a modicum of reason in our friend's remarks. I had hoped that Lord Blandamer would have contributed handsomely to the restoration fund, but he has not hitherto done so, though I dare say that his continued absence abroad accounts for some delay. He only succeeded his grandfather last year, and the late lord never showed much interest in this place, and was indeed in many ways a very strange character. But it's no use raking up these stories; the old man is gone, and we must hope for better things from the young one."
「若くはないですよ」と医者が言った。「まあ、八十五で死んだおじいさんに比べれば若いでしょうが、少なくとも四十にはなっいるはずですから」
"I don't know why you call him young," said the doctor. "He's young, maybe, compared to his grandfather, who died at eighty-five; but he must be forty, if he's a day."
「まさか。いや、そうなのかな。彼のご両親が亡くなったのはわたしがカランに赴任た最初の年のことでした。覚えいるかね、ミスタ・シャーノール――コリサンド号がパリオン湾で転覆たときのことを」
"Oh, impossible; and yet I don't know. It was in my first year at Cullerne that his father and mother were drowned. You remember that, Mr Sharnall--when the _Corisande_ upset in Pallion Bay?"
「ああ、よく覚えてますわい」と教会事務員が割りこんた。「結婚なすったときのことも。わしらが鐘を鳴らしおったら石工の爺さんのパーミターが聖堂に飛びこんでて『おまえら、やめんか。鐘を打つな。この古い塔が倒れるぞ。ぐらぐら揺れて、ひび割れたところから埃が雨のように降っいる』と言うんでさ。それで聖堂をました。中止になったのは好都合でしたがね。なんたってロンドン・ロードの牧草地では飲めや歌えやの祝宴が開かとって、わしらも行きたくてしょうがなかったですから。今度お告げの日(註 処女マリアの受胎告知を祝う三月二十五日)が来りゃ、あれから四十二年経つことになります。感心ねえって頭を振るやつもましたよ。ピールを中断するのは命や幸せの中断につながるってね。でも、ょうがねえじゃねえですか」
"Ay, I mind that well enough," struck in the clerk; "and I mind their being married, becos' we wor ringing of the bells, when old Mason Parmiter run into the church, and says: `Do'ant-'ee, boys--do'ant-'ee ring 'em any more. These yere old tower'll never stand it. I see him rock,' he says, `and the dust a-running out of the cracks like rain.' So out we come, and glad enough to stop it, too, because there wos a feast down in the meadows by the London Road, and drinks and dancing, and we wanted to be there. That were two-and-forty years ago come Lady Day, and there was some shook their heads, and said we never ought to have stopped the ring, for a broken peal broke life or happiness. But what was we to do?"
「その後、塔の補強をたのですか」とウエストレイが訊いた。「今もピールを鳴らすと異常な動きがありますか」
"Did they strengthen the tower afterwards?" Westray asked. "Do you find any excessive motion when the peal is rung now?"
「とんでもねえ、旦那。あの前も三十年間鳴らされねえままだったんで。あのときだって鳴らすつもりはなかったんだが、トム・リーチが『鐘紐があるじゃねえか。いっちょう鳴らしやろうぜ。三十年鳴っねえんだ。最後に鳴ったのがいつかも思い出せねえ。そのとき弱ったとしても、たっぷり時間があったからもう回復いるさ。ピールを鳴らしたやつには半クラウン出すぜ』って言うものでね。それでパーミターの爺さんに止められるまで鳴らしたってわけで。それからというものあの鐘は一度も鳴らされちゃおりません。間違いないですよ。あそこに紐がありますがね」そう言って彼ははるか頭上のランタンから垂れ下がり、壁にくくりつけられている鐘紐を指さした。「ありゃあ、礼拝用の鐘を鳴らすためのものですが、それだって大きい鐘じゃねえですからな」
"Lor' bless you, sir; them bells was never rung for thirty years afore that, and wouldn't a been rung then, only Tom Leech, he says: `The ropes is there, boys; let's have a ring out of these yere tower. He ain't been rung for thirty year. None on us don't recollect the last time he _was_ rung, and if 'er were weak then, 'ers had plenty of time to get strong again, and there'll be half a crown a man for ringing of a peal.' So up we got to it, till old Parmiter come in to stop us. And you take my word for it, they never have been rung since. There's only that rope there"--and he pointed to a bell-rope that came down from the lantern far above, and was fastened back against the wall--"wot we tolls the bell with for service, and that ain't the big bell neither."
「サー・ジョージはそういうことをみんな知ったんですか」ウエストレイは主任司祭に訊いた。
"Did Sir George Farquhar know all this?" Westray asked the Rector.
「いいえ、ご存じじゃなかったでしょう」主任司祭は幾分いらいらた口調で言った。「お話なければならないほど重要なことではありませんし、こちらにいるあいだはもっと緊急な問題に時間を取られていらっしゃいましたから。今の昔話など、わたし自身もはじめて聞きましたよ。鐘を鳴らしないのは事実ですが、それは揺れを支える鐘枠が弱っいるようだからで、塔自体とは何の関係もありません。わたしの言うことのほうが間違いありませんよ。サー・ジョージがお尋ねになったとき、申しあげたのです。『サー・ジョージ、わたしはここに四十年住んますが、この塔が倒れるまでお支払いを延ばしてくださるなら、こんなに嬉しいことはありません』とね。はっ、はっ、はっ!サー・ジョージもこの冗談を聞いて大笑いでしたよ!はっ、はっ、はっ!」
"No, sir; Sir George did not know it," said the Rector, with some tartness in his voice, "because it was not material that he should know it; and Sir George's time, when he was here, was taken up with more pressing matters. I never heard this old wife's tale myself till the present moment, and although it is true that we do not ring the bells, this is on account of the supposed weakness of the cage in which they swing, and has nothing whatever to do with the tower itself. You may take my word for that. `Sir George,' I said, when Sir George asked me--`Sir George, I have been here forty years, and if you will agree not to ask for your fees till my tower tumbles down, why, I shall be very glad.' Ha, ha, ha! how Sir George enjoyed that joke! Ha, ha, ha!"
ウエストレイはピールが中断れた話を本社に伝え、自分自身のためにも早期に塔の検査をしようと固く決意て顔を背けた。
Westray turned away with a firm resolve to report to headquarters the story of the interrupted peal, and to make an early examination of the tower on his own behalf.
教会事務員は話をても主任司祭がまともに取り合おうとないので腹を立てたが、他の人が興味深そうに耳を傾けいるのをて次のようにつづけた。
The clerk was nettled that the Rector should treat his story with such scant respect, but he saw that the others were listening with interest, and he went on:
「そりゃ、この古い塔が倒れるかどうかなんて、わたしにゃ分かりませんし、この先サー・ジョージがお困りなるような事態も望んじゃませんや。しかし鐘を途中で止めていいことのあったためしがねえんで。先代のブランダマー卿の場合がそうでした。まずご子息とご子息の奥様をカラン湾でお亡くしになりました。昨日のことのように思い出しますな、わしらは夜通し引っ掛け鉤でお二人を捜したんですが、朝になって潮が差したとき、三尋の深さのところに寄り添うように二人の死体を見つけました。それから今度は奥様と仲違いなさり、奥様は二度と口をきこうとませんでした――ええ、死ぬ日までね。ご夫婦はフォーディングに住んどったんですよ――あそこにでっかい屋敷を構えとりましてね」彼は親指で東のほうをさしながらウエストレイに言った。「二十年間、別々の棟に、まるで自分の家てえに住んどったんで。それから孫のミスタ・ファインズと喧嘩なさって、家からも土地からも追い出しておしまいになった。もっともお亡くなりなっときゃ、家も土地もお孫さんに残すしかなかったんですがね。このミスタ・ファインズというのがお若い御当主なんでて。外国を渡り歩いて人生の半分を過ごし、まだお戻りじゃないんですよ。もしかたら戻らないかも知れませんな。殺されたってことも充分あります。さもなきゃ、きっと司祭さんの手紙に返事を書いいるでしょうから。そう思いませんか、ミスタ・シャーノール」彼は不意にオルガン奏者のほうを振りむき、片目をつぶっ見せた。主任司祭が彼の話を鼻であしらったことへの仕返しのつもりだった。
"Well, 'taint for I to say the old tower's a-going to fall, and I hope Sir Jarge won't ever live to larf the wrong side o' his mouth; but stopping of a ring never brought luck with it yet, and it brought no luck to my lord. First he lost his dear son and his son's wife in Cullerne Bay, and I remember as if 'twas yesterday how we grappled for 'em all night, and found their bodies lying close together on the sand in three fathoms, when the tide set inshore in the morning. And then he fell out wi' my lady, and she never spoke to him again--no, not to the day of her death. They lived at Fording--that's the great hall over there," he said to Westray, jerking his thumb towards the east--"for twenty years in separate wings, like you mi'd say each in a house to themselves. And then he fell out wi' Mr Fynes, his grandson, and turned him out of house and lands, though he couldn't leave them anywhere else when he died. 'Tis Mr Fynes as is the young lord now, and half his life he's bin a wandrer in foreign parts, and isn't come home yet. Maybe he never will come back. It's like enough he's got killed out there, or he'd be tied to answer parson's letters. Wouldn't he, Mr Sharnall?" he said, turning abruptly to the organist with a wink, which was meant to retaliate for the slight that the Rector had put on his stories.
「もうよさないか。そんな話はたくさんだ」と主任司祭が言った。「聞き手が嫌がっいるじゃないか」
"Come, come; we've had enough of these tales," said the Rector. "Your listeners are getting tired."
「彼は口まめな男でしてね」彼はウエストレイの腕を取ると低い声で言った。「しゃべり出す止まらないのです。サー・ジョージと相談たことは他にもたくさんありまして、われわれがどういう結論に達したのかお話たいのですが、あのおしゃべり男に邪魔れたのが悔やまれますな。視察は明日済ませることにましょう。今の時期は日暮れが早くて残念です。袖廊の端の窓にはなかなかいい絵ガラスがはめられているんですよ」
"The man's in love with his own voice," he added in a lower tone, as he took Westray by the arm; "when he's once set off there's no stopping him. There are still a good many points which Sir George and I discussed, and on which I shall hope to give you our conclusions; but we shall have to finish our inspection to-morrow, for this talkative fellow has sadly interrupted us. It is a great pity the light is failing so fast just now; there is some good painted glass in this end window of the transept."
ウエストレイが上を見ると、袖廊の端の大きな窓が鈍く光った。光っいるいっても聖堂の内部に垂れこめる夕闇に比べれば明るいといった程度である。それは垂直様式の時代に造られた大きなもので、幅は壁一杯に広がり、高さもほぼ床から天井まであった。十一の小さな窓に仕切られ、上部に果てしなく細かい石細工を施したこの巨大な窓は、想像力を揺さぶった。縦仕切りと狭間飾りが外に残っいる陽の光を受けて黒く浮かび上がり、建築家は補助アーチや狭間飾りの構造を、見取り図を前にいるかのように、楽々と見て取ることができた。日没は日暮れ時の陰鬱な帳を吹き払う夕陽のきらめきもたらしなかったが、単調な灰色の空はまだ充分に明るく、熟練た目には窓の上部にいろいろな形の古いガラスがびっしり填めこまれているのが見えた。半透明の青や黄や赤が古いパッチワークのキルトのように、彩りよく混じり合っいるのだ。窓の下の方、両脇の小窓は着色れておらず、幽霊のように白いままだった。しかし中間部の三つの小窓は十七世紀の鮮やかな茶色と紫色に満たされてた。この豊かな色のあちらこちらにメダイヨンが挿入れてて、どうやらそれぞれ聖書の一場面をあらわしいるようだった。それぞれの小窓の上部、茨の下には紋章が描かれている。中間部分の上部が全体の構成の中心をなして、どうやら銀色の楯の表面を、海緑色の波形線が何本か横切っいる図像が描かれているようだった。ウエストレイは変わった色使いとガラスの透明感に注意を奪われた。すべてものが薄ぼんやりと見える中で、そのガラスだけはまるで内側から光を放射いるようだった。彼はほとんど無意識のうちに、これは誰の紋章なのかと尋ねようとして振り返った。しかし主任司祭はちょっと前から彼のそばを離れ、ややへだたった身廊のほうから癇に障る「はっ、はっ、はっ!」が聞こえたので、彼はサー・ジョージ・ファークワーと支払い延期の話がまたもや夕闇の中で新たな犠牲者に語られたのだと確信た。
Westray looked up and saw the great window at the end of the transept shimmering with a dull lustre; light only in comparison with the shadows that were falling inside the church. It was an insertion of Perpendicular date, reaching from wall to wall, and almost from floor to roof. Its vast breadth, parcelled out into eleven lights, and the infinite division of the stonework in the head, impressed the imagination; while mullions and tracery stood out in such inky contrast against the daylight yet lingering outside, that the architect read the scheme of subarcuation and the tracery as easily as if he had been studying a plan. Sundown had brought no gleam to lift the pall of the dying day, but the monotonous grey of the sky was still sufficiently light to enable a practised eye to make out that the head of the window was filled with a broken medley of ancient glass, where translucent blues and yellows and reds mingled like the harmony of an old patchwork quilt. Of the lower divisions of the window, those at the sides had no colour to clothe their nakedness, and remained in ghostly whiteness; but the three middle lights were filled with strong browns and purples of the seventeenth century. Here and there in the rich colour were introduced medallions, representing apparently scriptural scenes, and at the top of each light, under the cusping, was a coat of arms. The head of the middle division formed the centre of the whole scheme, and seemed to represent a shield of silver-white crossed by waving sea-green bars. Westray's attention was attracted by the unusual colouring, and by the transparency of the glass, which shone as with some innate radiance where all was dim. He turned almost unconsciously to ask whose arms were thus represented, but the Rector had left him for a minute, and he heard an irritating "Ha, ha, ha!" at some distance down the nave, that convinced him that the story of Sir George Farquhar and the postponed fees was being retold in the dusk to a new victim.
しかし建築家の心の内を明らかに見抜いた者がた。というのは鋭い声がこう言ったからである。
Someone, however, had evidently read the architect's thoughts, for a sharp voice said:
「それはブランダマー家の紋章だよ。――|雲形線が楯を六つに等分割《バーリイ・ネビュリー・オブ・シックス》、銀色《アージェント》と緑色《ヴァート》が交互に重なっいる」ますます濃くなる夕闇の中、彼のそばに立ったのはオルガン奏者だった。「こりゃうっかりた。そんな専門用語を使ったってお分かりならないだろうね。それにわたし自身、紋章なんてこの一つしか知らないんだ。ときどき思うんだよ」彼はため息をついた。「この紋章のことも知らなければよかったってね。あの楯についてはおかしな逸話が幾つかある。たぶんそれ以上に奇妙な話もまだあるんじゃないだろうか。いいにつけ、悪いにつけ、あれはこの聖堂や、この町に何世紀にもわたっ刻みこまれてた。居酒屋にたむろする連中ならみんな『雲形紋章』のことを自分がいる服みたいにしゃべっくれるよ。カランに一週間もたら、あんたもあれとはお馴染みになるだろう」
"That is the coat of the Blandamers--barry nebuly of six, argent and vert." It was the organist who stood near him in the deepening shadows. "I forgot that such jargon probably conveys no meaning to you, and, indeed, I know no heraldry myself excepting only this one coat of arms, and sometimes wish," he said with a sigh, "that I knew nothing of that either. There have been queer tales told of that shield, and maybe there are queerer yet to be told. It has been stamped for good or evil on this church, and on this town, for centuries, and every tavern loafer will talk to you about the `nebuly coat' as if it was a thing he wore. You will be familiar enough with it before you have been a week at Cullerne."
彼の声には、その場にふさわしくないある種の憂愁と真剣さがこもった。ウエストレイは奇妙な感じがてオルガン奏者をじっと見つめた。しかし暗すぎて相手の顔の表情は読み取れなかった。しかもその瞬間、主任司祭が彼らに加わった。
There was in the voice something of melancholy, and an earnestness that the occasion scarcely warranted. It produced a curious effect on Westray, and led him to look closely at the organist; but it was too dark to read any emotion in his companion's face, and at this moment the Rector rejoined them.
「え、何ですか?ああ、そうです、雲形紋章です。雲形《ネビュリー》というのはラテン語の『ネビュルム』、いや、『ネビュルス』かな、雲を意味する単語からて、あの波打つような帯状の線を指します。積雲をかたどったものと考えられているんですがね。どうも暗くなりすぎて今晩はこれ以上視察できませんな。しかし明日は一日中ご一緒できますよ。あなたの興味をひきそうなことをたくさんご説明申し上げることができます」
"Eh, what? Ah, yes; the nebuly coat. Nebuly, you know, from the Latin _nebulum, nebulus_ I should say, a cloud, referring to the wavy outline of the bars, which are supposed to represent cumulus clouds. Well, well, it is too dark to pursue our studies further this evening, but to-morrow I can accompany you the whole day, and shall be able to tell you much that will interest you."
ウエストレイは暗闇のせいで調査が中断たことを残念に思ってはなかった。聖堂の空気は刻一刻と冷たくねっとりくるし、疲れて腹が減り、しかもひどく寒気がた。彼はできることならさっそく下宿を探し、ホテルの高い宿泊費を払うことは避けたいと思った。彼の給料はささやかなものでしかなかったし、ファークワー・アンド・ファークワー社は他の会社と比べて決して部下に気前よく旅費を出すほうではなかったのである。
Westray was not sorry that the darkness had put a stop to further investigations. The air in the church grew every moment more clammy and chill, and he was tired, hungry, and very cold. He was anxious, if possible, to find lodgings at once, and so avoid the expense of an hotel, for his salary was modest, and Farquhar and Farquhar were not more liberal than other firms in the travelling allowances which they granted their subordinates.
彼は適当な下宿部屋はないだろうかと尋ねた。
He asked if anyone could tell him of suitable rooms.
「申し訳ない」と主任司祭が言った。「残念ながらわたしの家にお迎えすることができないのですよ。あいにく妻の気分がすぐれないものですからね。わたしはもちろん下宿屋とか下宿屋の経営者なんぞはあまり知らないんですが、しかし、ミスタ・シャーノールが相談にのっくれるでしょう。ミスタ・シャーノールが下宿いるところに空き部屋があるかも知れませんよ。あなたの下宿屋の女主人は尊敬べきわたしたちの友人ジョウリフさんの親戚だったね、ミスタ・シャーノール。きっと彼女も立派な女性に違いない」
"I am sorry," the Rector said, "not to be able to offer you the hospitality of my own house, but the indisposition of my wife unfortunately makes that impossible. I have naturally but a very slight acquaintance with lodging-houses or lodging-house keepers; but Mr Sharnall, I dare say, may be able to give you some advice. Perhaps there may be a spare room in the house where Mr Sharnall lodges. I think your landlady is a relation of our worthy friend Joliffe, is she not, Mr Sharnall? And no doubt herself a most worthy woman."
「失礼ですが、主任司祭」教区委員がはるか高位者にむかっ用いることができる、ありったけの憤慨をこめた声で言った。「失礼ですが、親戚なんかじゃありませんよ。名前が同じというだけ、あるいはせいぜいのところ、うんと遠いつながりというだけなんですから。これでもキリスト教的寛容の精神を最大限に発揮て我慢言っいるんですがね、わたしたちの側の親族としてはあんな人がいたって、ちっともうれしくないんで」
"Pardon, Mr Rector," said the churchwarden, in as offended a tone as he dared to employ in addressing so superior a dignitary--"pardon, no relation at all, I assure you. A namesake, or, at the nearest, a very distant connection of whom--I speak with all Christian forbearance--my branch of the family have no cause to be proud."
オルガン奏者は主任司祭がウエストレイを同じ下宿に住まわてはどうかと言ったとき顔をしかめたが、ジョウリフに下宿の女主人をけなされ頭にた様子だった。
The organist had scowled when the Rector was proposing Westray as a fellow-lodger, but Joliffe's disclaimer of the landlady seemed to pique him.
「あんたの側のどの親族も、わたしの下宿の女主人ほど体裁が悪くはないというなら、大手を振って往来を歩くがいいさ。あんたの売っいる豚肉がみんな彼女の貸間くらい上等なら、商売は大繁盛するだろう。さあ、来たまえ」彼はウエストレイの腕を取っ言った。「わたしには急に病気になるような連れ合いはない。だからわたしのうちであなたを歓迎さし上げよう。途中でミスタ・ジョウリフの店に立ち寄って、夕ご飯用にソーセージを一ポンド買っいこうか」
"If no branch of your family brings you more discredit than my landlady, you may hold your head high enough. And if all the pork you sell is as good as her lodgings, your business will thrive. Come along," he said, taking Westray by the arm; "I have no wife to be indisposed, so I can offer you the hospitality of my house; and we will stop at Mr Joliffe's shop on our way, and buy a pound of sausages for tea."
第二章 ~~~
CHAPTER TWO.
扉を開けると建物の中に外気が勢いよく流れこんだ。雨脚はいまだに激しかったが、強く吹き出した風が清々しい潮の香りを含み、聖堂内の息苦しい、朽ち果てた雰囲気とは際だった対照をなした。
There was a rush of outer air into the building as they opened the door. The rain still fell heavily, but the wind was rising, and had in it a clean salt smell, that contrasted with the close and mouldering atmosphere of the church.
オルガン奏者は深呼吸た。
The organist drew a deep breath.
「ああ、外に出るとせいせいするな――連中の小うるさい文句から解放れて。もったいぶったろくでなしの主任司祭や、偽善者のジョウリフや、知ったかぶりのお医者様から解放れて!地下納骨所をセメントで固めるなんて、どうして無駄なことに金を使いたがるのだ?病原菌をほじくり返すだけのことじゃないか。おまけにパイプオルガンには一銭も使おうとない。ファーザー・スミス(註 十七世紀のオルガン制作者)のオルガンには一ペニーも金をかけようとない。渓流のように清らかで美しい音を出すいうのに。まったくひどすぎる!白鍵は痛々しいほどすり減っているし、鍵盤のあいだに溝ができて木肌が見えいるんだ。足鍵盤は短すぎてぼろぼろ。いやはや、あのパイプオルガンはわたしにそっくりさ。年老いて、無視れ、くたびれきっいる死んだほうがましだよ」彼は半ば独り言のようにしゃべったが、ふとウエストレイのほうを振りむい言った。「不平を並べて悪かったね。あんたもわたしの歳になれば不平を鳴らすようになる。少なくとも、その歳になってわたしくらい貧乏で、ひとりぼっで、未来に希望がなければ。さあ、こっちだ」
"Ah," he said, "what a blessed thing to be in the open air again--to be quit of all their niggling and naggling, to be quit of that pompous old fool the Rector, and of that hypocrite Joliffe, and of that pedant of a doctor! Why does he want to waste money on cementing the vaults? It's only digging up pestilences; and they won't spend a farthing on the organ. Not a penny on the _Father Smith_, clear and sweet-voiced as a mountain brook. Oh," he cried, "it's too bad! The naturals are worn down to the quick, you can see the wood in the gutters of the keys, and the pedal-board's too short and all to pieces. Ah well! the organ's like me--old, neglected, worn-out. I wish I was dead." He had been talking half to himself, but he turned to Westray and said: "Forgive me for being peevish; you'll be peevish, too, when you come to my age--at least, if you're as poor then as I am, and as lonely, and have nothing to look forward to. Come along."
彼らは暗闇の中に足を踏み出し――とっくに夜の闇が降りた――水を撥ね散らかしながら、暗い芝生の上を流れる、白い小川のような、輝く板石敷きの道を進んだ。
They stepped out into the dark--for night had fallen--and plashed along the flagged path which glimmered like a white streamlet between the dark turves.
「近道しよう。街灯のない小径なんだけど」境内を離れるときオルガン奏者が言った。「そのほうが早く着くし、雨に当たらずにすむ」彼は急に左に曲がって路地に入りこんだが、そこがあまりに狭くて暗いものだから、ウエストレイは彼についいくことができず、闇の中を不安そうに手探りた。小男が戻って彼の腕を取った。 ~~~ 「先導あげよう。この道はよく知っいるんだ。まっすぐ歩きたまえ。段差はないから」
"I will take you a short-cut, if you don't mind some badly-lighted lanes," said the organist, as they left the churchyard; "it's quicker, and we shall get more shelter." He turned sharply to the left, and plunged into an alley so narrow and dark that Westray could not keep up with him, and fumbled anxiously in the obscurity. The little man reached up, and took him by the arm. "Let me pilot you," he said; "I know the way. You can walk straight on; there are no steps."
家々には人の気配もなければ灯りもついなかった。曲がり角に街灯がぽつんと一灯、わずかに揺らめく光りを投げかけてたのだが、そこまでたとき、ようやくウエストレイは窓にガラスがはまっおらず、どの家も空き家であることに気がついた。
There was no sign of life, nor any light in the houses, but it was not till they reached a corner where an isolated lamp cast a wan and uncertain light that Westray saw that there was no glass in the windows, and that the houses were deserted.
「ここは旧市街さ」オルガン奏者が言った。「もうどの家にも誰も住んじゃない。時流に流されやすいわれわれは、みんなこの先のほうへ移っしまった。川から吹いくる風は湿っぽいし、波止場の風紀はそりゃあ悪いからね」
"It's the old part of the town," said the organist; "there isn't one house in ten with anyone in it now. All we fashionables have moved further up. Airs from the river are damp, you know, and wharves so very vulgar."
They left the narrow street, and came on to what Westray made out to be a long wharf skirting the river. On the right stood abandoned warehouses, square-fronted, and huddled together like a row of gigantic packing-cases; on the left they could hear the gurgle of the current among the mooring-posts, and the flapping of the water against the quay wall, where the east wind drove the wavelets up the river. The lines of what had once been a horse-tramway still ran along the quay, and the pair had some ado to thread their way without tripping, till a low building on the right broke the line of lofty warehouses. It seemed to be a church or chapel, having mullioned windows with stone tracery, and a bell-turret at the west end; but its most marked feature was a row of heavy buttresses which shored up the side facing the road. They were built of brick, and formed triangles with the ground and the wall which they supported. The shadows hung heavy under the building, but where all else was black the recesses between the buttresses were blackest. Westray felt his companion's hand tighten on his arm.
彼らは狭い路地を離れ、川沿いに長く延びた波止場らしき場所にた。右側には使われてない倉庫が四角い正面をむけて、巨大な荷箱のように一列に並んいる。左側からは係船柱のあいだを流れる川水の音や、岸壁を舐める波の音が聞こえ、東風が川面にさざ波を立てた。昔の馬車鉄道の線路が今も波止場を貫くように残って、二人はつまずかないよう注意歩きながら、とうとう右側の大倉庫の列が一軒の低い建物によって途切れるところまでやってきた。それは教会か礼拝堂らしく、石の狭間飾りに、縦仕切りで仕切られた窓があり、西の端には鐘塔が建った。しかし何よりも目をひいたのは、道路に面した壁面を支える重量感あふれる控え壁だった。煉瓦造りで、地面とそれが支える壁とで三角形を形成いる。建物の下には濃い影が落ちたが、控え壁のあいだのくぼみが他のどこよりも黒々とた。ウエストレイは同伴者の手が腕を強く握りしめるのを感じた。
"You will think me as great a coward as I am," said the organist, "if I tell you that I never come this way after dark, and should not have come here to-night if I had not had you with me. I was always frightened as a boy at the very darkness in the spaces between the buttresses, and I have never got over it. I used to think that devils and hobgoblins lurked in those cavernous depths, and now I fancy evil men may be hiding in the blackness, all ready to spring out and strangle one. It is a lonely place, this old wharf, and after nightfall--" He broke off, and clutched Westray's arm. "Look," he said; "do you see nothing in the last recess?"
あきれた臆病者と思われるかも知れんが」とオルガン奏者は言った。「わたしは夜はこの道を通らないんだ。今夜もきみがなければここにはなかっただろう。子供のときから控え壁のあいだの暗闇が怖くて、今だに恐怖感が克服できない。昔は、あの洞窟みたいな深みに悪魔や鬼がうろついいる思ったが、今は悪者があの暗がりに隠れて、道行く人に飛びかかり首を絞めようと待ちかまえているような気がするんだ。寂しい場所だからね、この古い波止場は。夜になると――」彼はことばを切ってウエストレイの腕をつかんだ。「ほら、いちばん端のくぼみに何かいるんじゃないか」
His abruptness made Westray shiver involuntarily, and for a moment the architect fancied that he discerned the figure of a man standing in the shadow of the end buttress. But, as he took a few steps nearer, he saw that he had been deceived by a shadow, and that the space was empty.
不意を突かれてウエストレイは思わず身震い、一瞬、建築家は隅の控え壁の暗がりに男が立っいるのをたような気がた。しかし二三歩近寄っみると、影を間違えただけで誰もないことが分かった。
"Your nerves are sadly overstrung," he said to the organist. "There is no one there; it is only some trick of light and shade. What is the building?"
「相当神経質になっいるようですね」彼はオルガン奏者に言った。「誰もませんよ。光りと影の具合で錯覚ただけです。これは何の建物なんですか」 ~~~ 「昔はフランシスコ修道会の寄進礼拝堂だったんだ」とミスタ・シャーノールは答えた。「その後、カランが本格的に港として賑わうようになると、ここで輸入品に物品税をかけたのさ。今でも保税倉庫と呼ばれているくらいだ。しかしわたしが記憶するかぎりずっと閉まったままだがね。きみは物とか場所が人間の運命と固く結びついいる、なんてことを考えるかい。どうもこのおんぼろ礼拝堂はわたしにとって命に関わる場所のような気がする
"It was once a chantry of the Grey Friars," Mr Sharnall answered, "and afterwards was used for excise purposes when Cullerne was a real port. It is still called the Bonding-House, but it has been shut up as long as I remember it. Do you believe in certain things or places being bound up with certain men's destinies? because I have a presentiment that this broken-down old chapel will be connected somehow or other with a crisis of my life."
ウエストレイはオルガン奏者の聖堂での振る舞いを思い出し、この人は頭がおかしいのではないのかと思いはじめた。相手はそれを察知て、非難するようにこう言った。
Westray remembered the organist's manner in the church, and began to suspect that his mind was turned. The other read his thoughts, and said rather reproachfully:
「とんでもない、わたしは狂ってなんかないよ――愚かで、間抜けで、ひどく臆病なだけだ」
"Oh no, I am not mad--only weak and foolish and very cowardly."
彼らはすでに波止場のはずれに達し、明らかに文明の世界に戻ろうとた。というのは音楽が聞こえたからである。小さなビヤホールから流れたのだが、そばを通るとき中から女の歌声が聞こえた。豊かなコントラルトで、オルガン奏者はしばらく足を止め聞き入った。
They had reached the end of the wharf, and were evidently returning to civilisation, for a sound of music reached them. It came from a little beer-house, and as they passed they heard a woman singing inside. It was a rich contralto, and the organist stopped for a moment to listen.
「いい声をいる。歌の勉強をたらうまくなったのに。どうしてこんなところにたのだろう」
"She has a fine voice," he said, "and would sing well if she had been taught. I wonder how she comes here."
ブラインドは下ろされてたが、窓の下には届ききっおらず、彼らは隙間を通して中を覗いた。雨の雫がガラスの外側をたたり、ガラスの内側は結露たため、はっきりとは見えなかったが、クレオールの女が部屋の隅の火のそばに座る酔っぱらいたちに歌を歌っいることは分かった。中年の女だったが、甘い歌声で、老人が竪琴で伴奏をた。 ~~~
The blind was pulled down, but did not quite reach the bottom of the window, and they looked in. The rain blurred the pains on the outside, and the moisture had condensed within, so that it was not easy to see clearly; but they made out that a Creole woman was singing to a group of topers who sat by the fire in a corner of the room. She was middle-aged, but sang sweetly, and was accompanied on the harp by an old man:
どうかわたしを連れてって 愛する人がいる場所へ ~~~ かれらをここに連れて それがだめというのなら ~~~ 荒れた海のむこうまで ~~~ さまよう気力はとてもない
"Oh, take me back to those I love! Or bring them here to me! I have no heart to rove, to rove Across the rolling sea."
~~~ 「かわいそうに!」とオルガン奏者は言った。「何か不幸に遭って、あんな浅ましい連中に歌を歌う羽目になったのだろう。さあ、行こう」
"Poor thing!" said the organist; "she has fallen on bad days to have so scurvy a company to sing to. Let us move on."
右に曲がって数分歩くと大きな通りにた。二人の目の前に建ったのは、かつては立派なたたずまいを見せただろうと思われる家であった。柱に支えられたポーチがあり、その下には半円形の階段が両開きの戸口までつづいいる。正面には街灯が立って、雨にきれいに洗われて異常なくらい輝かしい光り放ち、夜でもその家の落魄た姿を浮かび上がらた。廃屋というわけではないが、ペンキのはげた窓枠や、何カ所か漆喰のはげたあら塗り仕上げの正面には「栄光は去れり」(註 サムエル記から)の文字が書き記されてた。ポーチの柱は大理石に似せてペンキが塗られてたのだが、化粧漆喰がはげて薄汚れたまだら模様をつくり、そこから煉瓦の芯が覗いた。
They turned to the right, and came in a few minutes to the highroad. Facing them stood a house which had once been of some pretensions, for it had a porch carried on pillars, under which a semicircular flight of steps led up to the double door. A street-lamp which stood before it had been washed so clean in the rain that the light was shed with unusual brilliance, and showed even at night that the house was fallen from its high estate. It was not ruinous, but _Ichabod_ was written on the paintless window-frames and on the rough-cast front, from which the plaster had fallen away in more than one place. The pillars of the porch had been painted to imitate marble, but they were marked with scabrous patches, where the brick core showed through the broken stucco.
オルガン奏者がドアを開けると、そこは石床の玄関ホールになって、左右に黒ずんだドアがあった。幅の広い石造りの階段が浅い踏み段と鉄の手すりを備え、玄関から二階へと延びている。板石の上にはすり切れたマットがむこう端まで小道をつくり、さらに階段を登るようにつづいた。
The organist opened the door, and they found themselves in a stone-floored hall, out of which dingy doors opened on both sides. A broad stone staircase, with shallow steps and iron balustrades, led from the hall to the next story, and there was a little pathway of worn matting that threaded its way across the flags, and finally ascended the stairs.
「ここがわたしの町屋敷さ」とミスタ・シャーノールが言った。「昔は乗り継ぎ用の馬を交換する宿で『神の手』と呼ばれてたんだ。でもその名前は決して口にちゃいけないよ。今は個人の持ち家となって、ミス・ジョウリフがベルヴュー・ロッジと命名たんだから」
"Here is my town house," said Mr Sharnall. "It used to be a coaching inn called The Hand of God, but you must never breathe a word of that, because it is now a private mansion, and Miss Joliffe has christened it Bellevue Lodge."
彼がしゃべっいるときドアが開いて一人の娘が玄関ホールにた。歳は十九歳くらい。背が高く、気品のある容姿の持ち主である。赤みがかった茶色の髪は真ん中で分けられ、あふれるようなそれを後ろで緩くまとめた。整えいるとも自然ともいえない一世代前の結い方だった。その顔は少女時代の丸みを帯びた輪郭を保ち、繊細な輝きも失っなかったが、未熟さの印象を否定する何かを持って、彼女の人生が必ずしも苦難と無縁ではなかったことを暗示た。彼女は身体にぴったりた黒のドレスをて、淡い色の珊瑚の首飾りをつけた。
A door opened while he was speaking, and a girl stepped into the hall. She was about nineteen, and had a tall and graceful figure. Her warm brown hair was parted in the middle, and its profusion was gathered loosely up behind in the half-formal, half-natural style of a preceding generation. Her face had lost neither the rounded outline nor the delicate bloom of girlhood, but there was something in it that negatived any impression of inexperience, and suggested that her life had not been free from trouble. She wore a close-fitting dress of black, and had a string of pale corals round her neck.
「こんばんは、ミスタ・シャーノール。濡れしまいましたわね。大したことなければいいけど」彼女はすばやく探るような視線をウエストレイに投げかけた。
"Good-evening, Mr Sharnall," she said. "I hope you are not very wet"-- and gave a quick glance of inquiry at Westray.
オルガン奏者は彼女をて不機嫌そうな顔を怒ったようにうなって「叔母さんはどこだね。話がある伝えくれ」と言い、玄関につながる部屋の一つにウエストレイを引っぱっていった。
The organist did not appear pleased at seeing her. He grunted testily, and, saying "Where is your aunt? Tell her I want to speak to her," led Westray into one of the rooms opening out of the hall.
そこは大きな部屋で、片隅にアップライトピアノがあり、大量の本と手書きの楽譜が散らかった。中央のテーブルにはお茶の用意があり、火格子の中では火が赤々と燃えいる。その両脇には藺草で座部を張った肘掛椅子があった。
It was a large room, with an upright piano in one corner, and a great litter of books and manuscript music. A table in the middle was set for tea; a bright fire was burning in the grate, and on either side of it stood a rush-bottomed armchair.
座りなさい」と彼はウエストレイに言った。「ここがわたしの応接室だ。もうすぐミス・ジョウリフがきみのためにどういう手はずを整えくれる分かるだろう」彼は相手をちらとて、「廊下で会ったのは彼女の姪さ」と付け加えたのだが、何気ない口調を装うすぎて意図たのとは反対の効果を与えしまった。ウエストレイは、あの若い女を人に見せたくない、何か理由でもあるのだろうかと思った。
"Sit down," he said to Westray; "this is my reception-room, and we will see in a minute what Miss Joliffe can do for _you_." He glanced at his companion, and added, "That was her niece we met in the passage," in so unconcerned a tone as to produce an effect opposite to that intended, and to lead Westray to wonder whether there was any reason for his wishing to keep the girl in the background.
しばらくて女主人があらわれた。六十になるこの女性は背が高くて痩せおり、感じのいい、気品すらある顔立ちをた。彼女も古くてみすぼらしい黒のドレスをたが、その外見は、痩せいるのは生まれつきの体質というより、窮乏と自制が原因らしいことをそれとなく示した。
In a few moments the landlady appeared. She was a woman of sixty, tall and spare, with a sweet and even distinguished face. She, too, was dressed in black, well-worn and shabby, but her appearance suggested that her thinness might be attributed to privation or self-denial, rather than to natural habit.
入居の手はずは簡単に整った。問題を提起たのはかえってウエストレイのほうだった。彼はミス・ジョウリフの申し出た家賃が不当に安すぎるのではないかと気になったのである。彼ははっきりそう言うと、家賃を少しだけ割り増しすることを申し出た。それは短い逡巡のあと、ありがたく受け入れられた。
Preliminaries were easily arranged; indeed, the only point of discussion was raised by Westray, who was disturbed by scruples lest the terms which Miss Joliffe offered were too low to be fair to herself. He said so openly, and suggested a slight increase, which, after some demur, was gratefully accepted.
「貧乏いるくせに良心的すぎるぞ」オルガン奏者は噛みつくように言った。「今からそんなに几帳面じゃあ、修復工事でたんまりもうけたあかつきには、鼻持ちならん人間になっいるわい」しかし彼はミス・ジョウリフに対するウエストレイの気遣いを明らかに喜んて、温かい口調でこう言い添えた。「一階のわたしの部屋で一緒に食事しよう。きみの部屋はこんな晩は氷室みたいになっいる。すぐ降りくるんだよ。さもないと亀のスープは冷えしまうし、ほおじろの肉は焼けすぎて炭になっしまう。夜会服をくることは免除あげよう。大礼服を持っいるなら話は別だが」
"You are too poor to have so fine a conscience," said the organist snappishly. "If you are so scrupulous now, you will be quite unbearable when you get rich with battening and fattening on this restoration." But he was evidently pleased with Westray's consideration for Miss Joliffe, and added with more cordiality: "You had better come down and share my meal; your rooms will be like an ice-house such a night as this. Don't be long, or the turtle will be cold, and the ortolans baked to a cinder. I will excuse evening dress, unless you happen to have your court suit with you."
ウエストレイは喜んで招待を受け、一時間後に彼とオルガン奏者は暖炉をはさんで藺草張りの肘掛椅子に座った。ミス・ジョウリフがみずからテーブルを片付け、タンブラーとワイングラスを二つずつ、それに砂糖と水差しを持った。まるでそれらがオルガン奏者の居間にあっしかるべきものだとでもいうように。
Westray accepted the invitation with some willingness, and an hour later he and the organist were sitting in the rush-bottomed armchairs at either side of the fireplace. Miss Joliffe had herself cleared the table, and brought two tumblers, wine-glasses, sugar, and a jug of water, as if they were natural properties of the organist's sitting-room.
「教区委員のジョウリフには悪いことを言っしまったな」ミスタ・シャーノールは心ゆくまで食事をたあとの瞑想的な気分に浸っ言った。「あそこのソーセージはなかなかうまい。もっと石炭をくべたまえ、ミスタ・ウエストレイ。九月に火を入れるなんて罪深い贅沢だ。石炭はトンあたり二十五シリングだしね。しかし修復工事の開始ときみの歓迎のために何かお祝いをなければならない。煙草をパイプに詰めて、わたしに回しくれ
"I did Churchwarden Joliffe an injustice," said Mr Sharnall, with the reflective mood that succeeds a hearty meal; "his sausages are good. Put on some more coal, Mr Westray; it is a sinful luxury, a fire in September, and coal at twenty-five shillings a ton; but we must have _some_ festivity to inaugurate the restoration and your advent. Fill a pipe yourself, and then pass me the tobacco."
「ありがとうございます。でも煙草はやらないので」とウエストレイは言った。実際彼は煙草を吸うようには見えなかった。彼の顔には根っからの禁酒家が持つかすかな冷淡さがあり、煙草を吸うなど自分にとっては犯罪に等しく、自分ほど気高い道徳規準を持たない人にあっては不作法を意味する語っいるかのようだった。
"Thank you, I do not smoke," Westray said; and, indeed, he did not look like a smoker. He had something of the thin, unsympathetic traits of the professional water-drinker in his face, and spoke as if he regarded smoking as a crime for himself, and an offence for those of less lofty principles than his own.
オルガン奏者はパイプに火をつけ、話をつづけた。
The organist lighted his pipe, and went on:
「ここは風通しのいい家だよ――衛生的でわれらが友人のお医者様も満足なさるだろう。どの窓にもひび割れ、隙間があって、換気には細心の注意を払っいる。昔は古い宿屋だったんだよ、このあたりにもっと人がた頃はね。正面が雨に濡れると今でもペンキを透かして『神の手』という字が読める。この外で市が開かれてたんだ。百年以上前だが、リンゴ売りの女がちょうどこの家のドアの前で青リンゴを客に売った。客は金を払ったと言うんだが、女は受け取っないと言う。それで喧嘩になって、女は嘘をついないことを証明するため天にむかっ呼びかけたのさ。『神様、もしもわたしが客の金に手を触れたら、どうぞ打ち殺してくだされ』とね。そのことば通り、彼女は絶命て小石の上に倒れた。手には銅貨が二枚握られてたよ。そんなもののために魂を失うとはね。人々は神の正義が示されたことをちゃんと後生に伝えるためには、宿を建てるのがいちばんだと、さっそくそう考えた。それで『神の手』が建てられ、カランが栄えたときは栄え、カランがうらぶれるのと一緒にうらぶれたのだ。わたしが物心のつく頃からずっと空き家だったのだが、十五年前にミス・ジョウリフが買い取った。彼女がここを高級下宿屋ベルヴュー・ロッジに変え、あのけちんぼ地主のブランダマー老人が修繕費用として寄こしたなけなしの金をつぎこんで正面の『神の手』という文字をペンキで消したのだ。ここはカランにたアメリカ人の保養施設になるはずだった。旅行案内を見るとピルグリム・ファーザーズの父親が何人かカランに埋葬れているということで、アメリカ人がカラン大聖堂までやって来るらしい。しかしアメリカ人なんてたことがない。わたしの目につかないところにいるんだろう。子供のときから六十年ここに住んいるが一ペニーだってアメリカ人がカラン大聖堂に寄付たり、ミス・ジョウリフのために使っくれたって話は聞いたことがない。連中は誰もベルヴュー・ロッジにやって来ないし、高級下宿屋は高級すぎて下宿人がきみとわたしだけというありさまだ」彼は一息ついてから話をつづけた。「アメリカ人か。感心ないね、アメリカ人というのは。わたしから見るとずいぶん図々しい連中だよ。自分の楽しみのためには大金をつぎこみ、ときには大口の寄付をて格好いいところを見せるが、ちゃんとそのことが喧伝れるということを見越した上でやっいるのさ。彼らには温かい心ってものがない。アメリカ人なんて気に入らないね。でもきみ、アメリカ人に知り合いがいるのなら、わたしは金次第でころっと意見を変える人間だからね。誰かわたしのオルガンを直してくれたら、アメリカ人みんなを褒め称えるよ。ついでに送風器として小さいウオーター・エンジンもつけくれなければいけないよ。カリスベリ大聖堂でオルガンを弾いいるシャターは最近ウオーター・エンジンを取りつけてもらってね。カランにも新しい水道ができたんだから、われわれだって使えるはずなんだ」
"This is an airy house--sanitary enough to suit our friend the doctor; every window carefully ventilated on the crack-and-crevice principle. It was an old inn once, when there were more people hereabouts; and if the rain beats on the front, you can still read the name through the colouring--the Hand of God. There used to be a market held outside, and a century or more ago an apple-woman sold some pippins to a customer just before this very door. He said he had paid for them, and she said he had not; they came to wrangling, and she called Heaven to justify her. `God strike me dead if I have ever touched your money!' She was taken at her word, and fell dead on the cobbles. They found clenched in her hand the two coppers for which she had lost her soul, and it was recognised at once that nothing less than an inn could properly commemorate such an exhibition of Divine justice. So the Hand of God was built, and flourished while Cullerne flourished, and fell when Cullerne fell. It stood empty ever since I can remember it, till Miss Joliffe took it fifteen years ago. She elevated it into Bellevue Lodge, a select boarding-house, and spent what little money that niggardly landlord old Blandamer would give for repairs, in painting out the Hand of God on the front. It was to be a house of resort for Americans who came to Cullerne. They say in our guide-book that Americans come to see Cullerne Church because some of the Pilgrim Fathers' fathers are buried in it; but I've never seen any Americans about. They never come to me; I have been here boy and man for sixty years, and never knew an American do a pennyworth of good to Cullerne Church; and they never did a pennyworth of good for Miss Joliffe, for none of them ever came to Bellevue Lodge, and the select boarding-house is so select that you and I are the only boarders." He paused for a minute and went on: "Americans--no, I don't think much of Americans; they're too hard for me--spend a lot of money on their own pleasure, and sometimes cut a dash with a big donation, where they think it will be properly trumpeted. But they haven't got warm hearts. I don't care for Americans. Still, if you know any about, you can say I am quite venal; and if any one of them restores my organ, I am prepared to admire the whole lot. Only they must give a little water-engine for blowing it into the bargain. Shutter, the organist of Carisbury Cathedral, has just had a water-engine put in, and, now we've got our own new waterworks at Cullerne, we could manage it very well here too."
ウエストレイは興味がなかったので、話題を戻した。
The subject did not interest Westray, and he flung back:
「ミス・ジョウリフは生活が苦しいんですか。昔は裕福だった感じですが」
"Is Miss Joliffe very badly off?" he asked; "she looks like one of those people who have seen better days."
「苦しいなんてものじゃない。飢え死に寸前だよ。いったいどうやって生計を立ているのやら。助けたいのは山々なんだが、こっちも懐中無一文だし、金があったとしても彼女はプライドが高いから受け取りゃん」 ~~~ 彼は部屋の奥のくぼみ据え付けられた棚のところへ行き、ずんぐりた黒い瓶を取り出した。
"She is worse than badly off--I believe she is half starved. I don't know how she lives at all. I wish I could help her, but I haven't a copper myself to jingle on a tombstone, and she is too proud to take it if I had."
「貧乏というのは寒気のする主題《テーマ》だね。変奏《ヴァリエーション》に入る前に一杯やって暖まろう」
He went to a cupboard in a recess at the back of the room, and took out a squat black bottle.
彼は瓶を友人のほうに押しやった。ウエストレイはつい手を出しかけたが、先頃固く決意た節制の誓いが彼を引き留め、丁寧なことばで誘惑を退けた。
"Poverty's a chilly theme," he said; "let's take something to warm us before we go on with the variations."
困った男だな」とオルガン奏者は言った。「どうしろいうのだ。酒は飲まん、煙草も吸わん。そのくせ貧乏について話をたがる。これは弁護士のマーテレットがくれたブランデーだよ。娘の結婚式にウエディングマーチを演奏たお礼だ。『ウエディングマーチはオルガン奏者ミスタ・ジョン・シャーノールによって華麗に奏せられた』まるでオルガン・ソナタ第四番のごとくにね。こいつはきっと関税を払っないぞ。物品税を払った酒を六本も人にやるようなやつじゃないからな」
He pushed the bottle towards his friend, but, though Westray felt inclined to give way, the principles of severe moderation which he had recently adopted restrained him, and he courteously waved away the temptation.
彼はウエストレイが思ったよりはるかにたっぷりと酒を注ぎ、相手の驚きに感づくと、たしなめるようにこう言った。「きみが上物を厭がって飲まないから、わたしが二人分の義務を果たさなければならない。教会の窓のてっぺんまで注げ、これが原則だ」彼はさらに注ぎ足して、タンブラーの上半分についいる刻み目のいちばん上まで満たししまった。しばらく沈黙がつづき、そのあいだ彼は怒ったようにパイプをふかしたが、タンブラーの酒をしこたまあおると、苦虫は溶け消え、再び話しはじめた。
"You're hopeless," said the organist. "What are we to do for you, who neither smoke nor drink, and yet want to talk about poverty? This is some _eau-de-vie_ old Martelet the solicitor gave me for playing the Wedding March at his daughter's marriage. `The Wedding March was magnificently rendered by the organist, Mr John Sharnall,' you know, as if it was the Fourth Organ-Sonata. I misdoubt this ever having paid duty; he's not the man to give away six bottles of anything he'd paid the excise upon."
He poured out a portion of spirit far larger than Westray had expected, and then, becoming intuitively aware of his companion's surprise, said rather sharply: "If you despise good stuff, I must do duty for us both. Up to the top of the church windows is a good maxim." And he poured in yet more, till the spirit rose to the top of the cuts, which ran higher than half-way up the sides of the tumbler. There was silence for a few minutes, while the organist puffed testily at his pipe; but a copious draught from the tumbler melted his chagrin, and he spoke again:
「わたしはかけがいのない生活苦を味わったが、ミス・ジョウリフの苦労はもっと深刻だ。それにわたしの場合は運の悪さに感謝すればいいだけだが、彼女の苦労は他人のせいだからね。まずお父さんが死んだ。お父さんはウィドコウムに農場を持って、裕福な暮らしをいる思われてたが、資産を整理すると、債権者に金を払ったらきれいになくなる程度でしかなかった。それでミス・ユーフィミアは家を手放し、カランにたのだ。こんなやたらとあちこちに張り出した家を選んだのは、賃貸料が年に二十ポンドと安かったからだよ。姪には(さっきた娘だ)実を与えて自分は皮を食べるといったその日暮らし、いやかつかつの生活をた。そうしたら一年前、兄のマーチンが無一文のうえに、身体に麻痺を抱え戻った。ずぼらな糞ったれさ。おいおい、予言者のうちなるサウル(註 サムエル記から。本章末尾註も参照)を見るみたいな、そんな顔はないでくれ。あいつはわたしと違って酒を飲まなかったよ。飲んいればもっとましな人間になったかも知れんがね」オルガン奏者はまたずんぐりた瓶に手を伸ばした。「酒を飲んたら彼女に迷惑をかけることも減っただろう。ところがいつも借金てトラブルに巻きこまれ、避難場所に帰るように妹のところへ帰っくる。彼女に愛されていることを知ったのだな。彼は頭がよかった。今風にいえ切れる男だった。しかし水みたいに落ち着きがなく、辛抱がきかないのだ。彼は妹にたかるつもりはなかったと思うたかっいることに気がついてもなかっただろう。しかしやっいることはそういうことだったのさ。彼は何度も旅にた。どこに行くのか誰も知らない。もっとも何を探しいるのかはよく知ったがね。あるときは二ヶ月、あるときは二年間なくなった。そのあいだ、ずっとミス・ジョウリフがアナスタシア――つまり姪――を養い、夏のあいだだけでも下宿人ができたりて、ようやく苦労から抜け出せそうだと思ったら、マーチンが舞い戻り、借金返済のために金をせびったり彼女の貯えを食いつぶすのだ。わたしは何回もその光景をたし、彼らのことを思って何度も胸を痛めた。しかしわたしに何ができるというのだ?こっちも素寒貧だというのに。一年前、最後に彼が戻ったとき、顔に死相が浮かんたよ。それをてわたしは喜び、彼らに心配をかけるのもこれで終わりだと思った。けれどもそれは麻痺だったのだ。それに彼は丈夫な男で、馬鹿のエニファーが彼を殺すのにえらく手間取った。彼が死んだのはほんの二ヶ月前さ。あの世ではもっと幸せに暮らしいることを願って乾杯しよう」
"I've had a precious hard life, but Miss Joliffe's had a harder; and I've got myself to thank for my bad luck, while hers is due to other people. First, her father died. He had a farm at Wydcombe, and people thought he was well off; but when they came to reckon up, he only left just enough to go round among his creditors; so Miss Euphemia gave up the house, and came into Cullerne. She took this rambling great place because it was cheap at twenty pounds a year, and lived, or half lived, from hand to mouth, giving her niece (the girl you saw) all the grains, and keeping the husks for herself. Then a year ago turned up her brother Martin, penniless and broken, with paralysis upon him. He was a harum-scarum ne'er-do-well. Don't stare at me with that Saul-among-the-prophets look; _he_ never drank; he would have been a better man if he had." And the organist made a further call on the squat bottle. "He would have given her less bother if he had drunk, but he was always getting into debt and trouble, and then used to come back to his sister, as to a refuge, because he knew she loved him. He was clever enough--brilliant they call it now--but unstable as water, with no lasting power. I don't believe he meant to sponge on his sister; I don't think he knew he did sponge, only he sponged. He would go off on his travels, no one knew where, though they knew well what he was seeking. Sometimes he was away two months, and sometimes he was away two years; and then, when Miss Joliffe had kept Anastasia--I mean her niece--all the time, and perhaps got a summer lodger, and seemed to be turning the corner, back would come Martin again to beg money for debts, and eat them out of house and home. I've seen that many a time, and many a time my heart has ached for them; but what could I do to help? I haven't a farthing. Last he came back a year ago, with death written on his face. I was glad enough to read it there, and think he was come for the last time to worry them; but it was paralysis, and he a strong man, so that it took that fool Ennefer a long time to kill him. He only died two months ago; here's better luck to him where he's gone."
オルガン奏者は不作法にならない程度に酒をしたたかあおった。
The organist drank as deeply as the occasion warranted.
「そんな陰気な顔はよしくれ。いつもこんなにひどい訳じゃない。元手がないんでね。マーテレットから毎日ブランデーがもらえるわけでもないし」
"Don't look so glum, man," he said; "I'm not always as bad as this, because I haven't always the means. Old Martelet doesn't give me brandy every day."
過度の不節制に思わず顔をしかめたウエストレイは、非難がまし表情を打ち消すと、次のような質問をてミスタ・シャーノールの舌を再び滑らかにた。
Westray smoothed away the deprecating expression with which he had felt constrained to discountenance such excesses, and set Mr Sharnall's tongue going again with a question:
「ジョウリフは何のために旅にたんですか」
"What did you say Joliffe used to go away for?"
「ああ、そいつは長い話だ。またもや雲形紋章さ。教会で話しただろう――銀色と海緑色が彼を狂わせたのだ。自分はジョウリフ家の者ではない、ブランダマー家の一員だ、そしてフォーディングの正当な後継者だ、彼はそう思いこんだのだ。子供のときはカラン・グラマー・スクールに通い、成績は優秀、オックスフォードでは奨学金をもらった。大学ではさらに優秀な成績を収め、世の中にて出世街道をまっしぐらというときに、この雲形紋章が熱病のように彼をつかまえ、彼の心に取りしまった。後年、彼の身体をじわじわと侵しいった麻痺みたいにね」
"Oh, it's a long story; it's the nebuly coat again. I spoke of it in the church--the silver and sea-green that turned his head. He would have it he wasn't a Joliffe at all, but a Blandamer, and rightful heir to Fording. As a boy, he went to Cullerne Grammar School, and did well, and got a scholarship at Oxford. He did still better there, and just when he seemed starting strong in the race of life, this nebuly coat craze seized him and crept over his mind, like the paralysis that crept over his body later on."
「よく分からないのですが」とウエストレイは言った。「なぜ彼はブランダマー家の人間だと思ったのですか。父親が誰か、知らなかったのですか」
"I don't quite follow you," Westray said. "Why did he think he was a Blandamer? Did he not know who his father was?"
「彼は十五年前に死んだ小地主、マイケル・ジョウリフの倅として育てられた。だがね、マイケルの結婚相手は自称未亡人で、三歳になる男の連れ子がいたんだな。その子がマーチンなんだ。マイケルは彼を自分の子供として引き取り、彼の頭のよさを自慢に、大学にやり、遺産をすべて彼に残した。オックスフォードでうぬぼれ出すまで、ジョウリフ家の人間じゃないんだ、などという話はなかったのだが、突然この気まぐれな考えに取り憑かれ、残りの人生を父親探しついやしたというわけだ。荒野をさまようこと四十年。あれやこれやの手がかりを見つけ、ついにピスガ山に登り約束の地を眺め見ることができる思ったのだが、しかし彼はその景色を、いや、その蜃気楼だな、それを見るだけで満足なければならなかった。そして乳と蜜を味わう前に死んしまったのさ」
"He was brought up as a son of old Michael Joliffe, a yeoman who died fifteen years ago. But Michael married a woman who called herself a widow, and brought a three-year-old son ready-made to his wedding; and that son was Martin. Old Michael made the boy his own, was proud of his cleverness, would have him go to college, and left him all he had. There was no talk of Martin being anything but a Joliffe till Oxford puffed him up, and then he got this crank, and spent the rest of his life trying to find out who his father was. It was a forty-years' wandering in the wilderness; he found this clue and that, and thought at last he had climbed Pisgah and could see the promised land. But he had to be content with the sight, or mirage I suppose it was, and died before he tasted the milk and honey."
「彼は雲形紋章とどういう関係があったんです?どうしてブランダマー家の一員だと思いこんだのですか」
"What was his connection with the nebuly coat? What made him think he was a Blandamer?"
「ああ、今はその話はたくないよ」オルガン奏者は言った。「もしかたら、わたしはとっくにしゃべりすぎいるのかも知れない。わたしが何か言ったなどと、ミス・ジョウリフに悟られないようにくれよ。彼女はマイケル・ジョウリフの実の子供だ――唯一の子供だ――しかし彼女は腹違いの兄をとても愛して、彼のいかれた振る舞いを人にからかわれるのがいやなのさ。もちろんカランの口さがない連中は彼のことでいろいろな噂話をする。その都度、ますます髪が白くなり、狂気じみた表情になって彼が戻っくると、連中は『雲形じいさん』と彼のことを呼び、ガキどもは道で彼に会うとお辞儀を『お早うございます、ブランダマー卿』とやるんだ。彼の話はたっぷり聞く機会があるだろう。可哀想な妹にとっちゃあ、耐えられないくらいつらいことなんだよ、兄さんがからかわれ、笑いものにれているのを見るのは。そのあいだも兄貴は妹の貯金を食いつぶしいるんだがね。しかしそんなことはみんな終わった。マーチンは雲形紋章なんか誰もつけないところへ行っしまった」
"Oh, I can't go into that now," the organist said; "I have told you too much, perhaps, already. You won't let Miss Joliffe guess I have said anything, will you? She is Michael Joliffe's own child--his only child--but she loved her half-brother dearly, and doesn't like his cranks being talked about. Of course, the Cullerne wags had many a tale to tell of him, and when he came back, greyer each time and wilder-looking, from his wanderings, they called him `Old Nebuly,' and the boys would make their bow in the streets, and say `Good-morning, Lord Blandamer.' You'll hear stories enough about him, and it was a bitter thing for his poor sister to bear, to see her brother a butt and laughing-stock, all the time that he was frittering away her savings. But it's all over now, and Martin's gone where they don't wear nebuly coats."
「彼の妄想に根拠はなかったのですね」ウエストレイは訊いた。
"There was nothing in his fancies, I suppose?" Westray asked.
「それはわたしより賢い人間に訊きたまえ」オルガン奏者は無関心そうに言った。「主任司祭か、医者か、誰か本当に利口な人にね」
"You must put that to wiser folk than me," said the organist lightly; "ask the Rector, or the doctor, or some really clever man."
彼は冷笑的な口調にかえったが、そのことばには、頭がおかしいのではないかという、先ほどの疑惑を思い出させる何かがあり、ふとウエストレイは、ジョウリフ家との付き合いが長すぎてミスタ・シャーノール自身にもマーチンの妄想がのりうつったのかも知れないと考えた。
He had fallen back into his sneering tone, but there was something in his words that recalled a previous doubt, and led Westray to wonder whether Mr Sharnall had not lived so long with the Joliffes as to have become himself infected with Martin's delusions.
話し相手はブランデーをさらにつぎ足し、建築家はお休みなさいといとまを告げた。
His companion was pouring out more brandy, and the architect wished him good-night.
ウエストレイの部屋は上の階にあり、彼はさっそく寝室に入った。旅やら午後聖堂の中に長いこと立ったせいでひどく疲れたのである。荷物が解かれ、服が丁寧に引き出し収められているのをて彼は喜んだ。これは彼がなかなか味わえない贅沢であり、しかも染み一つない白いカーテンとベッドのシーツには溌剌とた暖炉の火影が揺れた。
Mr Westray's apartment was on the floor above, and he went at once to his bedroom; for he was very tired with his journey, and with standing so long in the church during the afternoon. He was pleased to find that his portmanteau had been unpacked, and that his clothes were carefully arranged in the drawers. This was a luxury to which he was little accustomed; there was, moreover, a fire to fling cheerful flickerings on spotlessly white curtains and bedlinen.
ミス・ジョウリフとアナスタシアは二人で鞄を抱えながら家の最下部から最上部まで大きな石の螺旋階段を登った。ちょっとした力仕事でしばしば息継ぎに立ち止まったり、痛んだ腕を休めるために鞄を下に置いたりた。ようやく上の階まで運び上げ、その革紐が解かれたときにミス・ユーフィミアは姪を部屋から追い出した。
Miss Joliffe and Anastasia had between them carried the portmanteau up the great well-staircase of stone, which ran from top to bottom of the house. It was a task of some difficulty, and there were frequent pauses to take breath, and settings-down of the portmanteau to rest aching arms. But they got it up at last, and when the straps were undone Miss Euphemia dismissed her niece.
いけないわ。片付けはわたしがます。殿方の衣類を整理するなんて、若い娘がすることじゃありません。わたしもそんなことはたくなかった頃があるけど、今はもうお婆ちゃんだから、あまり関係がないの」
"No, my dear," she said; "let _me_ set the things in order. It is not seemly that a young girl should arrange men's clothes. There was a time when I should not have liked to do so myself, but now I am so old it does not very much matter."
彼女は話をながら鏡をて、キャップからはみ出した白髪を軽くかき上げ、蝶結びにた首飾りのリボンを直して、できるだけすり切れた部分が隠れるようにた。アナスタシア・ジョウリフは部屋を出るとき、年老いた顔のしわがいつもより少なく、しかも華やいだ表情を浮かべいる思い、叔母が結婚なかったことを不思議に思った。若者は年老いた未婚女性を見ると、彼女が結婚なかったのは男性からむきもれなかったからだと考える。六十の衰えた容色の中に十六の美しさを読み取ることは難しい――はるか昔に熱烈な求愛を受け、それが涙によってかき消された記憶が老いの穏やかな表情の下に埋もれ、いまだに忘れ去られず残っいるとはなかなか想像できないものだ。
She gave a glance at the mirror as she spoke, adjusted a little bit of grizzled hair which had strayed from under her cap, and tried to arrange the bow of ribbon round her neck so that the frayed part should be as far as possible concealed. Anastasia Joliffe thought, as she left the room, that there were fewer wrinkles and a sweeter look than usual in the old face, and wondered that her aunt had never married. Youth looking at an old maid traces spinsterhood to man's neglect. It is so hard to read in sixty's plainness the beauty of sixteen--to think that underneath the placidity of advancing years may lie buried, yet unforgotten, the memory of suits urged ardently, and quenched long ago in tears.
ミス・ユーフィミアはすべてを注意深く整頓いった。建築家の持ち衣装はごくつつましいものではあったが、彼女にはよくそろって高価なもののようにさえ見えた。しかし彼女はウズラが逃げこんだ場所を見定める猟師のような目で、いろいろな穴やらほころびやらボタンがなくなっいることを見いだし、暇な折りにさっそくそれらを繕っやろうと決心た。一定の歳を過ぎるとまともな女性はすべからく裁縫仕事をたり、その仕上がりを思い浮かべることにまざまざと貴重な喜びを感じるようになるものだ。
Miss Euphemia put everything carefully away. The architect's wardrobe was of the most modest proportions, but to her it seemed well furnished, and even costly. She noted, however, with the eye of a sportsman marking down a covey, sundry holes, rents, and missing buttons, and resolved to devote her first leisure to their rectification. Such mending, in anticipation and accomplishment, forms, indeed, a well-defined and important pleasure of all properly constituted women above a certain age.
「お気の毒にねえ」と彼女は独り言を言った。「ずっと着るものの面倒を見る人がなかったんだわ」そして可哀想だと思うあまり、つい寝室に火を入れるという贅沢なもてなしにはしっしまった。
"Poor young man!" she said to herself. "I am afraid he has had no one to look after his clothes for a long time." And in her pity she rushed into the extravagance of lighting the bedroom fire.
上の階の準備が終わると彼女は下に降りてミスタ・ウエストレイの居間がきちんと整理れているか点検た。そこを見回っいるとき、下の階からオルガン奏者が建築家に語りかける声が聞こえた。その声はひどく低くてしわがれおり、彼女の足の裏に響くように思われた。彼女は暖炉の上の飾りに軽くはたきをかけた。それは段々になった置物で、鏡を取り囲むように意味もなく小さな棚やくぼみできた。金物屋の未亡人ミセス・カイゼルがカランを離れるときに家財道具を売り出し、そのときのオークションの目玉として出されたものをミス・ジョウリフが買い上げたのだ。
After things were arranged upstairs, she went down to see that all was in order in Mr Westray's sitting-room, and, as she moved about there, she heard the organist talking to the architect in the room below. His voice was so deep and raucous that it seemed to jar the soles of her feet. She dusted lightly a certain structure which, resting in tiers above the chimney-piece, served to surround a looking-glass with meaningless little shelves and niches. Miss Joliffe had purchased this piece-of-resistance when Mrs Cazel, the widow of the ironmonger, had sold her household effects preparatory to leaving Cullerne.
「これはオーバーマンテルよ」彼女はそれが家に持っられたとき、怪訝そうな顔をたアナスタシアに言った。「本当は買う気がなかったのだけど、朝からずっと何も買っなかったし、競売人がわたしを睨むように見るから入札なければならないような気がたの。そうしたら他の人はみんな黙っいるじゃない。それでここにあるわけ。でもこれがあるとお部屋の体裁がちょっとよくなる思うわ。もしかたらこれをて下宿人がくれるかも」
"It is an overmantel, my dear," she had said to dubious Anastasia, when it was brought home. "I did not really mean to buy it, but I had not bought anything the whole morning, and the auctioneer looked so fiercely at me that I felt I must make a bid. Then no one else said anything, so here it is; but I dare say it will serve to smarten the room a little, and perhaps attract lodgers."
そのあと青いエナメル塗料で鮮やかに色を塗り直し、マーチンがあるとき放浪の旅の土産として持ったブルサシルクで花綵《はなづな》を作って横に飾り、水銀の剥げかかっいる箇所が見えないようにた。ミス・ジョウリフは花綵をちょっとだけ前のほうに引っぱり、横のくぼみの一つに置いある、半世紀前にビーコンヒルの定期市で買ったよい子のお茶碗セットを置き直した。模造の果物を入れたバスケットの、ドーム形のガラス蓋を拭き、暖炉からつきだした防火用ついたてのねじを締め、ステレオスコープの下に敷いたビーズマットのしわを伸ばし、最後に親切そうな顔に満足きった笑みを浮かべて部屋を見回した。
Since then it had been brightened with a coat of blue enamel paint, and a strip of Brusa silk which Martin had brought back from one of his wanderings was festooned at the side, so as to hide a patch where the quicksilver showed signs of peeling off. Miss Joliffe pulled the festoon a little forward, and adjusted in one of the side niches a present-for-a-good-girl cup and saucer which had been bought for herself at Beacon Hill Fair half a century ago. She wiped the glass dome that covered the basket of artificial fruit, she screwed up the "banner-screen" that projected from the mantelpiece, she straightened out the bead mat on which the stereoscope stood, and at last surveyed the room with an expression of complete satisfaction on her kindly face.
一時間後ウエストレイは眠りにつき、ミス・ジョウリフはお祈りを唱えた。彼女は自分の家にふさわしい、紳士的な下宿人を寄こしてくれた天の配慮に特別な感謝を捧げ、この屋根の下にいるあいだは彼が幸せでありますようにと、心をこめて祈りを捧げた。しかしお祈りはミスタ・シャーノールのピアノの音にさえぎられた。 ~~~ 「とっても素敵な演奏ね」彼女は蝋燭を消しながら姪に言った。「でも夜遅くに弾くのはやめてほしいわ。お祈りのとき、わたし、そのことをちゃんと強く念じなかったみたい」
An hour later Westray was asleep, and Miss Joliffe was saying her prayers. She added a special thanksgiving for the providential direction to her house of so suitable and gentlemanly a lodger, and a special request that he might be happy whilst he should be under her roof. But her devotions were disturbed by the sound of Mr Sharnall's piano.
アナスタシア・ジョウリフは何も言わなかった。彼女はオルガン奏者が古いワルツを乱暴に演奏たのが悲しかった。しかも演奏の仕方から彼が酔っいることを知ったのだ。 ~~~
"He plays most beautifully," she said to her niece, as she put out the candle; "but I wish he would not play so late. I am afraid I have not thought so earnestly as I should at my prayers."
(註 シャーノールの「予言者のうちなるサウルを見るみたいな、そんな顔」という台詞は「サムエル記」十九章二十~二十四節に言及いる。サウルがダビデとサムエルのもとに使者を送るが、何度送っても使者は予言者の仲間入りをしまう。サウルは最後にみずからむくが、彼も予言者の仲間入りをする。シャーノールはマーチンがろくでなしだと言うが、ウエストレイから見れば、奇妙な振る舞いを、酒をあおるシャーノールもろくでなしの仲間でしかない。シャーノールは不思議なくらい鋭くウエストレイの心を読む
Anastasia Joliffe said nothing. She was grieved because the organist was thumping out old waltzes, and she knew by his playing that he had been drinking.
第三章 ~~~
CHAPTER THREE.
「神の手」はこの自治郡の中でもいちばんの高台にあり、ウエストレイの部屋はその三階にあった。居間の窓からは家並とそのむこうのカラン・フラット、海と町をへだてる広大な塩水性の牧草地が見渡せた。前景には赤いかわら屋根が延々と並び、中景には聖セパルカ大聖堂の、高々とかかげられた塔と屋根の大棟《おおむね》が見え、その偉容はあたりの家を残らずその壁の内に呑みこむのではないかと思わた。そして遠景には青い海があった。
The Hand of God stood on the highest point in all the borough, and Mr Westray's apartments were in the third story. From the window of his sitting-room he could look out over the houses on to Cullerne Flat, the great tract of salt-meadows that separated the town from the sea. In the foreground was a broad expanse of red-tiled roofs; in the middle distance Saint Sepulchre's Church, with its tower and soaring ridges, stood out so enormous that it seemed as if every house in the place could have been packed within its walls; in the background was the blue sea.
夏になると紫色のもやが河口にかかり、湿地から立ちのぼる熱気のきらめきを通して、カル川が銀色にうねって海に流れるさまや、雪のように白い雁の群れや、あちこちに輝く遊覧船を見ることができる。しかし秋になると、ウエストレイがはじめてたように、繁茂する草はいっそう緑を濃く、塩水性の牧草地は表面に不規則な粘土色の水路をはわた。それは満潮時は老人の目尻のしわのように見えるのだが、干潮時はねっとりた土手にはさまれ、虹色の水を底にたたえた小さな溝へと縮こまった。もぐらが柔らかい茶色の壌土でうねり道のような小型の土饅頭を盛り上げるのはこの秋である。そして泥炭採掘場では切り出し人夫がより大きな、より黒々とた泥炭のかたまりを積み上げるのだ。
In summer the purple haze hangs over the mouth of the estuary, and through the shimmer of the heat off the marsh, can be seen the silver windings of the Cull as it makes its way out to sea, and snow-white flocks of geese, and here and there the gleaming sail of a pleasure-boat. But in autumn, as Westray saw it for the first time, the rank grass is of a deeper green, and the face of the salt-meadows is seamed with irregular clay-brown channels, which at high-tide show out like crows'-feet on an ancient countenance, but at the ebb dwindle to little gullies with greasy-looking banks and a dribble of iridescent water in the bottom. It is in the autumn that the moles heap up meanders of miniature barrows, built of the softest brown loam; and in the turbaries the turf-cutters pile larger and darker stacks of peat.
かつてはこの風景にもう一つ目をひくものがあった。多くの豪華船、バルト諸国と交易する材木運搬船、茶輸送専門の快速帆船、大型インド貿易船、移民船、こうしたものの帆柱や帆桁がられ、ときにはカランの冒険家が有する船の傾斜たスパーもられた。これらはすべてとっくの昔に最後の港にむけて船出おり、今では立派な船と言っても、冬のあいだ、よどんだ入り江に係船れているドクタ・エニファーの帆船《センターボード》が帆柱を見せいるくらいである。しかしそれでもこの風景は充分に印象的であり、「神の手」の上階の窓は、知る人ぞ知る、町でいちばん眺めのいい場所だった。
Once upon a time there was another feature in the view, for there could have been seen the masts and yards of many stately ships, of timber vessels in the Baltic trade, of tea-clippers, and Indiamen, and emigrant ships, and now and then the raking spars of a privateer owned by Cullerne adventurers. All these had long since sailed for their last port, and of ships nothing more imposing met the eye than the mast of Dr Ennefer's centre-board laid up for the winter in a backwater. Yet the scene was striking enough, and those who knew best said that nowhere in the town was there so fine an outlook as from the upper windows of the Hand of God.
大勢の人がこの窓からその風景を望みた。船長の妻は結局戻ることのなかった夫のバーク船が引き綱で引かれながら川を下っいくのを目で追った。西から早馬で旅た新婚夫婦はカランで足を止め、夏のたそがれ時に椅子に座って手を取り合い、白い霧が牧草地の上に立ちのぼり、宵の明星がすみれ色の空に輝かしくかかるまで海のほうを見つめつづけた。カラン義勇農騎兵団を徴募たフロビシャー船長はフランスの先兵があらわれないかと携帯用望遠鏡で見張りを、最後にマーチン・ジョウリフは安楽椅子に座って、ブランダマー家の全財産を受け継いだら何に使おうと思案を巡らしながらその最後の日々を過ごした。
Many had looked out from those windows upon that scene: the skipper's wife as her eyes followed her husband's barque warping down the river for the voyage from which he never came back; honeymoon couples who broke the posting journey from the West at Cullerne, and sat hand in hand in summer twilight, gazing seaward till the white mists rose over the meadows and Venus hung brightening in the violet sky; old Captain Frobisher, who raised the Cullerne Yeomanry, and watched with his spy-glass for the French vanguard to appear; and, lastly, Martin Joliffe, as he sat dying day by day in his easy-chair, and scheming how he would spend the money when he should come into the inheritance of all the Blandamers.
ウエストレイは朝食を終えてしばらくのあいだ、開け放った窓の前に立った。その日の朝は穏やかな快晴で、秋の大雨の後はしばしばそうなるように、大気に輝くような透明感があった。しかし彼は窓の前の障害物のせいで心から風景を楽しむことができなかった。邪魔なのは羊歯を入れたガラスのケースで、水槽をひっくり返した形のものが質素な木のテーブルの上に載ってたのだ。ウエストレイはじめじめた植物と、ガラスの内側に張り付く露の玉が気にくわず、この羊歯を部屋から取り払うことに決意た。彼はミス・ジョウリフに片づけてもらえるかどうか、尋ねみようと思い、さらにこの決意は不必要な家具が他にもないだろうかと、彼に検討を促すことになった。
Westray had finished breakfast, and stood for a time at the open window. The morning was soft and fine, and there was that brilliant clearness in the air that so often follows heavy autumn rain. His full enjoyment of the scene was, however, marred by an obstruction which impeded free access to the window. It was a case of ferns, which seemed to be formed of an aquarium turned upside down, and supported by a plain wooden table. Westray took a dislike to the dank-looking plants, and to the moisture beaded on the glass inside, and made up his mind that the ferns must be banished. He would ask Miss Joliffe if she could take them away, and this determination prompted him to consider whether there were any other articles of furniture with which it would be advisable to dispense.
He made a mental inventory of his surroundings. There were several pieces of good mahogany furniture, including some open-backed chairs, and a glass-fronted book-case, which were survivals from the yeoman's equipment at Wydcombe Farm. They had been put up for auction with the rest of Michael Joliffe's effects, but Cullerne taste considered them old-fashioned, and no bidders were found for them. Many things, on the other hand, such as bead mats, and wool-work mats, and fluff mats, a case of wax fruit, a basket of shell flowers, chairs with worsted-work backs, sofa-cushions with worsted-work fronts, two cheap vases full of pampas-grass, and two candlesticks with dangling prisms, grated sadly on Westray's taste, which he had long since been convinced was of all tastes the most impeccable. There were a few pictures on the walls--a coloured representation of young Martin Joliffe in Black Forest costume, a faded photograph of a boating crew, and another of a group in front of some ruins, which was taken when the Carisbury Field Club made an expedition to Wydcombe Abbey. Besides these, there were conventional copies in oils of a shipwreck, and an avalanche, and a painting of still-life representing a bowl full of flowers.
彼は心のなかで周囲の家具の目録を作った。質のいいマホガニー製の家具が幾つかあった。背板のない椅子や、正面がガラス張りの本棚などがそれで、これらはウィドコウム農場にあった自由農民《ヨーマン》の家具の生き残りである。マイケル・ジョウリフの他の所有物と一緒にオークションに出されたのだが、カランの人の趣味からは古すぎるみなされ、入札者がなかったのだ。他方、ビーズマットとか毛糸刺繍マット、綿毛マット、ケースに入った蝋細工の果物、貝殻サルビアのかご、背中に梳毛《そもう》織物を張った椅子、おもてが梳毛織物のソファ用クッション、白銀葦をいっぱい生けた安物の花瓶二つ、プリズム状の飾りを付けた蝋燭立て二脚、これらはひどくウエストレイの趣味に合わなかった。昔から彼は自分の趣味こそは非の打ち所のない最高の趣味であると信じこんた。壁には数葉の写真がかかった――ブラック・フォレストの衣装をた若きマーチン・ジョウリフのカラー写真、ボートチームの色あせた写真、何かの廃墟の前に立つ別のグループの写真。これはカリスベリ博物学同好会がウィドコウム修道院へ見学旅行たときのものである。その他には難破船とか雪崩を描いた、よく見かける油絵や、花瓶いっぱいの花を描いた静物画も一点あった。
This last picture weighed on Westray's mind by reason of its size, its faulty drawing, and vulgar, flashy colours. It hung full in front of him while he sat at breakfast, and though its details amused him for the time, he felt it would become an eyesore if he should continue to occupy the room. In it was represented the polished top of a mahogany table on which stood a blue and white china bowl filled with impossible flowers. The bowl occupied one side of the picture, and the other side was given up to a meaningless expanse of table-top. The artist had perceived, but apparently too late, the bad balance of the composition, and had endeavoured to redress this by a few more flowers thrown loose upon the table. Towards these flowers a bulbous green caterpillar was wriggling, at the very edge of the table, and of the picture.
この最後の絵はその大きさといい、稚拙さといい、俗悪でけばけばしい色といい、ウエストレイの気分を滅入らた。朝食の席につくとその絵が真正面に見え、しばらくは細部の面白さに興をそそられたが、引きつづきこの部屋に住むなれば目障りでしかなくなるだろうと彼は感じた。白と青に塗られた陶磁の花瓶が、磨き上げられたマホガニーのテーブルの上に置かれ、およそ珍妙な花が生けられた絵である。花瓶が絵の半分を占め、もう半分にはテーブルの上板が意味もなく広がった。画家は構成のバランスの悪さに気がついたのだが、そのときはもう明らかに手遅れの段階に達して、テーブルの上に花を数本ばらまくことで修正を施そうとたようだった。この花を目指してぶよぶよた緑色の芋虫がテーブルの端、つまり絵の端で身をくねらた。
The result of Westray's meditations was that the fern-case and the flower-picture stood entirely condemned. He would approach Miss Joliffe at the earliest opportunity about their removal. He anticipated little trouble in modifying by degrees many other smaller details, but previous experience in lodgings had taught him that the removal of pictures is sometimes a difficult and delicate problem.
ウエストレイは熟慮の末、羊歯のケースと花の絵は部屋に置くにはまったくふさわしくないと判断た。できるだけ早い機会にミス・ジョウリフと相談取り払っもらおう。他の細々た点は、さほど面倒もなく、少しずつ変えいってもらえるだろうと思ったが、それまでの下宿の経験から、絵をはずすのは、ときに困難で、細心の注意を要する問題であることを知った。 ~~~ 彼は丸めた設計図を開いて必要なものを選び、聖堂に行く準備をた。足場を作るために大工と打ち合わせをなければならなかった。下宿を出る前に昼食の注文をおこうと思い、女主人を呼ぶために梳毛糸でできた太い呼び鈴の紐を引いた。しばらく前からバイオリンの音が聞こえて、呼び鈴の返事を待ちながら耳を澄また彼は、音楽が途切れたり繰り返されたりするのを聞いてオルガン奏者がバイオリンの稽古をつけいるのだと思った。最初の呼び出しに応答がなく、二回目の試みも同様に失敗すると、彼はいらいらと立てつづけに何度も紐を引いた。すると音楽が止み、彼は憤慨をこめ鳴らした呼び鈴がきっと音楽家たちの注意を引き、オルガン奏者がミス・ジョウリフを呼び行ったのだろうと考えた。
He opened his rolls of plans, and selecting those which he required, prepared to start for the church, where he had to arrange with the builder for the erection of scaffolding. He wished to order dinner before he left, and pulled a broad worsted-work bell-pull to summon his landlady. For some little time he had been aware of the sound of a fiddle, and as he listened, waiting for the bell to be answered, the intermittance and reiteration of the music convinced him that the organist was giving a violin lesson. His first summons remained unanswered, and when a second attempt met with no better success, he gave several testy pulls in quick succession. This time he heard the music cease, and made no doubt that his indignant ringing had attracted the notice of the musicians, and that the organist had gone to tell Miss Joliffe that she was wanted.
彼はほったらかしれて癇癪をおこし、ようやくドアにノックの音がたとき、女主人の怠慢を叱責しようと身構えた。彼女が部屋に入っくると、彼は図面から目を離さずにこう切り出した。
He was ruffled by such want of attention, and when there came at last a knock at his door, was quite prepared to expostulate with his landlady on her remissness. As she entered the room, he began, without turning from his drawings:
「呼び鈴を聞いたときはノックないでください。それより――」
"Never knock, please, when you answer the bell; but I do wish you--"
彼はことばを失った。というのは目を上げると彼が話しかけてたのは年かさのミス・ジョウリフではなく、姪のアナスタシアだったからである。彼女は昨晩たときと同じように優雅な姿で、波打つ茶色の髪はその独特の美しさでまたもや彼の注意を引いた。いらだちはたちどころに消え、使用人の役割を貴婦人が演じいることに気づいたとたん、繊細な心が感じて当然の、困惑の気持ちでいっぱいになっしまった。彼はアナスタシア・ジョウリフが貴婦人であることを信じ疑わなかった。彼女を非難するかわりに、奇妙な事態を引き起こしたのは自分の責任であるかのごとく振る舞った。
Here he broke off, for on looking up he found he was speaking, not to the elder Miss Joliffe, but to her niece Anastasia. The girl was graceful, as he had seen the evening before, and again he noticed the peculiar fineness of her waving brown hair. His annoyance had instantaneously vanished, and he experienced to the full the embarrassment natural to a sensitive mind on finding a servant's role played by a lady, for that Anastasia Joliffe was a lady he had no doubt at all. Instead of blaming her, he seemed to be himself in fault for having somehow brought about an anomalous position.
彼女は目を伏せ立ったのだが、彼の咎めるような口調が頬に赤味をもたらし、その赤味が彼を狼狽はじめ、彼女が次のようにしゃべったときには完全に打ちのめされてしまった。
She stood with downcast eyes, but his chiding tone had brought a slight flush to her cheeks, and this flush began a discomfiture for Westray, that was turned into a rout when she spoke.
「ごめんなさい。お待たしまって。最初、鈴の音が聞こえなかったのです。別なところにて、手がふさがっましたから。そのあと叔母が応対にたと思ったんです。外出中とは知りませんでした」
"I am very sorry, I am afraid I have kept you waiting. I did not hear your bell at first, because I was busy in another part of the house, and then I thought my aunt had answered it. I did not know she was out."
低い、美しい声だったが、そこには恥ずかしさよりも疲れがこもった。彼が叱りつけるつもりなら、彼女はそれを甘んじ受ける覚悟だった。ところが今やおろおろと詫びを述べいるのはウエストレイのほうだった。ミス・ジョウリフに伝えてもらえませんか、午後一時に昼食を食べ帰ると。料理は何でも構いませんから。うろたえ気味ではあったけれど親切なことばが返って娘はややほっとた様子だった。彼女が部屋をいって、ようやくウエストレイはカランがヒメジで有名だと聞いたことを思い出した。彼は昼食にヒメジを注文するつもりでたのだ。水しか飲まない禁欲生活をたので、その分、食欲を満足せようと食べ物にはうるさかった。しかし魚を忘れしまったことを後悔はなかった。悲惨にも賤しい立場に身を落とした若い貴婦人とヒメジの特性及びその調理について議論するなど、崇高を滑稽に転落せる愚かな振る舞いでしかなかった。
It was a low, sweet voice, with more of weariness in it than of humility. If he chose to blame her, she was ready to take the blame; but it was Westray who now stammered some incoherent apologies. Would she kindly tell Miss Joliffe that he would be in for dinner at one o'clock, and that he was quite indifferent as to what was provided for him. The girl showed some relief at his blundering courtesy, and it was not till she had left the room that Westray recollected that he had heard that Cullerne was celebrated for its red mullet; he had meant to order red mullet for dinner. Now that he was mortifying the flesh by drinking only water, he was proportionately particular to please his appetite in eating. Yet he was not sorry that he had forgotten the fish; it would surely have been a bathos to discuss the properties and application of red mullet with a young lady who found herself in so tragically lowly a position.
ウエストレイが聖堂に出かけたあと、アナスタシア・ジョウリフはミスタ・シャーノールの部屋に戻った。実はバイオリンを弾いたのは彼女だったのである。オルガン奏者はピアノの前に座っていらいらと腹立たしげに和音をかき鳴らしてた。
After Westray had set out for the church, Anastasia Joliffe went back to Mr Sharnall's room, for it was she who had been playing the violin. The organist sat at the piano, drumming chords in an impatient and irritated way.
「どうだったい」彼女が入ったとき、振り返りず彼は言った。「ご主人様はわがレディに何を要求なさったんだい。家のてっぺんまでおまえさんを駆け上がらせるとは何事かね。あの男の首をねじ切ってやりたいよ。いつものように息が切れて手が震えいるじゃないか。もうさっきみたいに演奏することすらできん。それだけじゃない。おやおや」彼は彼女を叫んだ。「七面鳥みたいに真赤じゃないか。あの男に愛の告白でもれたのか」
"Well," he said, without looking at her as she came in--"well, what does my lord want with my lady? What has he made you run up to the top of the house for now? I wish I could wring his neck for him. Here we are out of breath, as usual, and our hands shaking; we shan't be able to play even as well as we did before, and that isn't saying much. Why," he cried, as he looked at her, "you're as red as a turkey-cock. I believe he's been making love to you."
「ミスタ・シャーノール」彼女はすぐさま言い返した。「そんなことを言うのなら、もう二度とあなたのお部屋にはません。そんなふうに話をするときのあなたは大嫌い。いつものあなたじゃないわ」
"Mr Sharnall," she retorted quickly, "if you say those things I will never come to your room again. I hate you when you speak like that, and fancy you are not yourself."
彼女はバイオリンを取り上げて脇に抱え、アルペッジョを鋭く鳴らした。
She took her violin, and putting it under her arm, plucked arpeggi sharply.
「ほらほら。そう何でもかんでも真面目に受け取らないでくれ。身体の調子が悪くていらいらいるだけだよ。許しくれ。誰もおまえさんに言い寄りないことくらい知っいるさ、ふさわしい相手があらわれるまでな。わたしはそんな相手があらわれなければいいと思っいる、アナスタシア――ずっとあらわれなければいいと思うよ」
"There," he said, "don't take all I say so seriously; it is only because I am out of health and out of temper. Forgive me, child; I know well enough that there'll be no lovemaking with you till the right man comes, and I hope he never will come, Anastasia--I hope he never will."
彼女は彼の言い訳を受け入れもなければ、はねつけず、音が低くなった弦を締めつけた。
She did not accept or refuse his excuses, but tuned a string that had gone down.
「どうたってゆうんだ!」彼女が演奏しようと譜面台に近づいたとき彼は言った。「ラがフラットになっいるのが聞き取れないのか。パンケーキみたいにフラットじゃないか(註 「フラット」に「平ら」と「半音低い」の意をかけいる)」
"Good heavens!" he said, as she walked to the music-stand to play; "can't you hear the A's as flat as a pancake?"
彼女は何もいわずに弦を締め直し、中断れた楽章を弾きはじめた。しかし彼女は音楽に集中できずミスを重ねた。
She tightened the string again without speaking, and began the movement in which they had been interrupted. But her thoughts were not with the music, and mistake followed mistake.
「いったい何をやっいるんだ」オルガン奏者は言った。「五年前に始めたときよりひどいじゃないか。これ以上やっても時間の無駄だよ、おまえさんにとっても、わたしにとっても」
"What _are_ you doing?" said the organist. "You're worse than you were when we began five years ago. It's mere waste of time for you to go on, and for me, too."
その瞬間、彼女がいらだたしさのあまり泣いいることに気づき、彼は座ったまま演奏用の腰掛けをくるりと回転た。
Then he saw that she was crying in the bitterness of vexation, and swung round on his music-stool without getting up.
「アンスティス、本気で言ったんじゃないんだ。乱暴な口をきくつもりはなかったんだ。腕は上がっいるよ――本当に。時間の無駄といったが、わたしには他にすることなんてないし、おまえさん以外に教える相手もない。それに喜んくれるなら、わたしが昼も夜もおまえさんのために時間を捧げることは知っいるだろう。泣かないでくれ。どうして泣くんだい」
"Anstice, I didn't mean it, dear. I didn't mean to be such a brute. You are getting on well--well; and as for wasting my time, why, I haven't got anything to do, nor anyone to teach except you, and you know I would slave all day and all night, too, if I could give you any pleasure by it. Don't cry. Why are you crying?"
彼女はバイオリンをテーブルに置き、昨日の晩ウエストレイが座った藺草張りの椅子に腰かけると、両手で頭を抱え、わっとばかりに泣き出した。
She laid the violin on the table, and sitting down in that rush-bottomed chair in which Westray had sat the night before, put her head between her hands and burst into tears.
「ああ」彼女は啜り泣きの合間に、奇妙な震える声でいった。「ああ、なんてみじめなんでしょう――何もかも情けなくてたまらない。お父さんの借金は残っいるし、お葬式のお金も葬儀屋に払っない。何をするにも先立つものがないわ。可哀想なユーフィミア叔母さんは死ぬほど働いいる。叔母さんは家のなかの小物を売らなければならないって言っいるのよ。それにせっかく品のいい下宿人、おとなしくて紳士的な人がくれたというのに、呼び鈴を鳴らしただけで、あなたは彼のことをののしり、わたしにひどいことを言うんですもの。どうしてあの人に叔母が外出中だと分かるんです?叔母が家にいるときは、呼び鈴が鳴ってもわたしに応対をせようとないなんて、どうしてあの人に分かるんです。もちろん、うちに使用人がいる思っいるのでしょうね。それにあなたはわたしをとっても悲しい気持ちにせるわ。昨日の晩は眠れなかった。あなたがお酒を飲んいることを知ったから。床に就いたとき、あなたが安っぽい曲を弾いいるのが聞こえたわ。酔っいるとき以外は大嫌いな曲を。何年も一緒に住んて、わたしにずっと優しくくれたのに、今になってこんなことになるなんて。どうかお酒は止めて。わたしたちはみんな充分にみじめなんです、あなたにこれ以上みじめな思いをられなくたって」
"Oh," she said between her sobs in a strange and uncontrolled voice--"oh, I am so miserable--_everything_ is so miserable. There are father's debts not paid, not even the undertaker's bill paid for his funeral, and no money for anything, and poor Aunt Euphemia working herself to death. And now she says she will have to sell the little things we have in the house, and then when there is a chance of a decent lodger, a quiet, gentlemanly man, you go and abuse him, and say these rude things to me, because he rings the bell. How does he know aunt is out? how does he know she won't let me answer the bell when she's in? Of course, he thinks we have a servant, and then _you_ make me so sad. I couldn't sleep last night, because I knew you were drinking. I heard you when we went to bed playing trashy things that you hate except when you are not yourself. It makes me ill to think that you have been with us all these years, and been so kind to me, and now are come to this. Oh, do not do it! Surely we all are wretched enough, without your adding this to our wretchedness."
彼は腰掛けから立ち上がり、彼女の手を取った。
He got up from the stool and took her hand.
「そんなふうに言わないでくれ、アンスティス――どうか。わたしは前にも酒を断ったことがある。またきっぱり止めるよ。あのときは女のせいで酒に手を出し、身を持ち崩した。わたしのような老いぼれが酒をくらっ死のうが死ぬまいが、誰も気にないと思ったのだ。心配くれる人がいるのだと分かりさえすれば。おまえさんが心配いるんだと思うことさえできれば」
"Don't, Anstice--don't! I broke myself of it before, and I will break myself again. It was a woman drove me to it then, and sent me down the hill, and now I didn't know there was a living soul would care whether old Sharnall drank himself to death or not. If I could only think there was someone who cared; if I could only think you cared."
「もちろん、わたし、心配いるわ」――彼の手に力がこもるのを感じたとき、彼女はそっと自分の手を引っこめた――「もちろん、わたしたち、心配いるわ――叔母さんもわたしも――叔母さんもこのことを知れば、心配するでしょう。ただ叔母さんはお人好しすぎ分かっないだけなの。夕食後にあなたがお酒を飲んいる、あの忌まわしいグラスは見るのもいや。前は全然違ったのに。わたしは家がしんと静まりかえったとき『牧歌』とか『告別《ル・アデュ》』の演奏を聞くのが大好きだったわ」
"Of course I care"--and as she felt his hand tighten she drew her own lightly away--"of course we care--poor aunt and I--or she would care, if she knew, only she is so good she doesn't guess. I hate to see those horrid glasses taken in after your supper. It used to be so different, and I loved to hear the `Pastoral' and `Les Adieux' going when the house was still."
不幸が人間から自然な笑顔を隠ししまうたら、それは悲しいことだ。早朝の空模様は期待を裏切らず、空は青く澄み、綿のように白く輝く雲が、島やら大陸の形をなし浮かんた。柔らかな温かい西風が吹き、どの庭の茂みでも鳥が秋の訪れを忘れて楽しげにさえずった。カランは庭の町であり、人々はそれぞれの葡萄の木の下、無花果《いちじく》の木の下に安らうことができた(註 列王記Ⅰから)。蜜蜂は巣を飛び出し、いっせいにぶんぶんと陽気な羽音を立てながら、壁の上を濃紫色《こむらさきいろ》に覆う木蔦《づた》の実にむらがった。聖セパルカ大聖堂の塔は角に小尖塔を備えたが、その上の古い風見鶏がめっき直したように光り、千鳥の大群がカラン湿地の上空を旋回ては、不意にむきを変えて銀色のきらめき放った。オルガン奏者の部屋の開け放った窓からも黄金色の陽が射しこみ、色あせて擦り切れた絨毯の、シャクヤクの模様を照らし出した。
It is sad when man's unhappiness veils from him the smiling face of nature. The promise of the early morning was maintained. The sky was of a translucent blue, broken with islands and continents of clouds, dazzling white like cotton-wool. A soft, warm breeze blew from the west, the birds sang merrily in every garden bush, and Cullerne was a town of gardens, where men could sit each under his own vine and fig-tree. The bees issued forth from their hives, and hummed with cheery droning chorus in the ivy-berries that covered the wall-tops with deep purple. The old vanes on the corner pinnacles of Saint Sepulchre's tower shone as if they had been regilt. Great flocks of plovers flew wheeling over Cullerne marsh, and flashed with a blinking silver gleam as they changed their course suddenly. Even through the open window of the organist's room fell a shaft of golden sunlight that lit up the peonies of the faded, threadbare carpet.
しかし部屋の中には二つの哀れな心が息づいてた。一つは不幸に、一つは絶望に沈み、金色の風見鶏も、紫色の木蔦の実も、千鳥も、陽の光もず、鳥の声も蜜蜂の羽音も聞いなかった。
But inside beat two poor human hearts, one unhappy and one hopeless, and saw nothing of the gold vanes, or the purple ivy-berries, or the plovers, or the sunlight, and heard nothing of the birds or the bees.
うむ止めるよ」とオルガン奏者は言ったが、その声に先ほどのような力はこもっなかった。彼がアナスタシア・ジョウリフに近づくと、彼女は立ち上がっ笑いながら部屋をた。
"Yes, I will give it up," said the organist, though not quite so enthusiastically as before; and as he moved closer to Anastasia Joliffe, she got up and left the room, laughing as she went out.
「お芋の皮むきをなくてはいけないわ。さもないとあなたのお昼がないんですもの」
"I must get the potatoes peeled, or you will have none for dinner."
ミスタ・ウエストレイは貧乏にも老齢にも悩まされず、胃の調子もいいし、自分の力と前途のいずれにもこの上ない自信を抱いたから、その日の美しさを心ゆくまで楽しむことができた。彼はその日の朝、前の晩にオルガン奏者に連れられて歩いた、曲がりくねった裏通りを避け、光の子(註 キリスト教徒のこと)のごとく、大通を歩いて聖堂にむかった。すると町の印象ががらりと変わった。大雨は舗道や車道をきれいに洗った。市のある広場に入ったとき、彼は溌剌とた光景や、その場に横溢する静かな賑わいに心を打たれた。
Mr Westray, being afflicted neither with poverty nor age, but having a good digestion and entire confidence both in himself and in his prospects, could fully enjoy the beauty of the day. He walked this morning as a child of the light, forsaking the devious back-ways through which the organist had led him on the previous night, and choosing the main streets on his road to the church. He received this time a different impression of the town. The heavy rain had washed the pavements and roadway, and as he entered the Market Square he was struck with the cheerfulness of the prospect, and with the air of quiet prosperity which pervaded the place.
広場の二辺に並ぶ家々は、建物の上部が舗道に張り出して、ずんぐりた木の柱に支えられるアーケードを形造ってた。ここにはその所有者が「最高の店舗」と自負する店が並んた。カスタンスは雑貨屋、ローズ・アンド・ストーリーは服地屋で、その正面は三軒分の広さを持ち、おまけに角には「仕立て専門」の「部署」まで持った。ルーシーは本屋で、カラン・エグザミナー紙を印刷、最近発生たコレラ根絶のためカランで取られた対策に関するドクタ・エニファーの論文や、さらには参事会員パーキンの説教集をも何冊か出版た。カルビンは馬具商、ミス・アドカットは玩具店を経営、プライアは薬剤師と郵便局長を兼任いる。広場の三つ目の辺の中心にはブランダマー・アームズが建って、淡黄褐色の広い正面を見せ、緑のブランインドが下り、窓の建具はオークの木目模様に塗装れてた。ホテル前の舗道の縁から石の階段がのび、その横に立つ白くて背の高い棒のてっぺんには緑色と銀色の雲形紋章そのものがはためいてた。ブランダマー・アームズの両脇には数軒、当世風の店がかたまったが、アーケードがないため、赤い筋の入った茶色い日覆いで満足なければならなかった。この商店の一つが豚肉を売るミスタ・ジョウリフの店だった。彼は開いた窓からウエストレイに挨拶た。
On two sides of the square the houses overhung the pavement, and formed an arcade supported on squat pillars of wood. Here were situated some of the best "establishments," as their owners delighted to call them. Custance, the grocer; Rose and Storey, the drapers, who occupied the fronts of no less than three houses, and had besides a "department" round the corner "exclusively devoted to tailoring"; Lucy, the bookseller, who printed the _Cullerne Examiner_, and had published several of Canon Parkyn's sermons, as well as a tractate by Dr Ennefer on the means adopted in Cullerne for the suppression of cholera during the recent outbreak; Calvin, the saddler; Miss Adcutt, of the toy-shop; and Prior, the chemist, who was also postmaster. In the middle of the third side stood the Blandamer Arms, with a long front of buff, low green blinds, and window-sashes grained to imitate oak. At the edge of the pavement before the inn were some stone mounting steps, and by them stood a tall white pole, on which swung the green and silver of the nebuly coat itself. On either side of the Blandamer Arms clustered a few more modern shops, which, possessing no arcade, had to be content with awnings of brown stuff with red stripes. One of these places of business was occupied by Mr Joliffe, the pork-butcher. He greeted Westray through the open window.
「お早うございます。もうお仕事の時間ですか」彼は建築家が丸めて脇に抱えいる設計図を指さした。「こんな修復工事に呼ばれるなんて、名誉なことですよ」彼はそう言って陳列台の肉片をもっとおいしそうに見えるよう置き直した。「きっとあなたの努力に神様のお恵みがあるでしょう。わたしもお昼頃、仕事の合間を縫って、聖堂で静かに瞑想するんです。そのときお目にかかったら、できる範囲で何でもお手伝いますよ。それまではわれわれ二人とも自分の仕事に精を出しましょう」
"Good-morning. About your work betimes, I see," pointing to the roll of drawings which the architect carried under his arm. "It is a great privilege, this restoration to which you are called," and here he shifted a chop into a more attractive position on the show-board--"and I trust blessing will attend your efforts. I often manage to snatch a few minutes from the whirl of business about mid-day myself, and seek a little quiet meditation in the church. If you are there then, I shall be glad to give you any help in my power. Meanwhile, we must both be busy with our own duties."
彼はソーセージ製造器のハンドルを回しはじめ、ウエストレイは彼の信心深いことばと、それにもまして鼻持ちならない恩着せましさから逃れることができてほっとた。
He began to turn the handle of a sausage-machine, and Westray was glad to be quit of his pious words, and still more of his insufferable patronage.
第四章 ~~~
CHAPTER FOUR.
広場に面したカラン大聖堂の北面はまだ日陰だったが、中に入ると南窓から太陽が射しこみ、建物全体が素晴らしく柔らかな光の洪水に包まれてた。確かにイギリスには聖セパルカより大きな教会はあるし、この聖堂は同じ規模の修道院建築と比べ、屋根が低いために均整がとれないという欠陥があるが、しかしそれにもかかわらずこれほど真に威厳があり、堂々とた建造物がかつてあったかどうかは疑わしい。
The north side of Cullerne Church, which faced the square, was still in shadow, but, as Westray stepped inside, he found the sunshine pouring through the south windows, and the whole building bathed in a flood of most mellow light. There are in England many churches larger than that of Saint Sepulchre, and fault has been found with its proportions, because the roof is lower than in some other conventual buildings of its size. Yet, for all this, it is doubtful whether architecture has ever produced a composition more truly dignified and imposing.
身廊は千百三十五年、ウオルター・ル・ベックによって起工れ、両側に低い、半円アーチのアーケードを備えいる。アーチを一つ一つ区切っいる円柱には、ダラムやウォルサムやリンディスファーンの聖堂にられるような紋様の彫刻はなく、またウインチェスター大聖堂の身廊やグロスター大修道院の聖歌隊席にられるような垂直様式の柱が巻きついてもおらず、ひたすらその無装飾とすさまじい直径によって見る人を圧倒た。その上には暗い洞窟のような奥行きを持つトリフォリウムがあり、さらにその上には小さな、まばらな開口部を持つクリアストーリーがある。これらすべての上にかぶさっいるのが石造穹窿で、刳形装飾を施された重たい交差リブがアーチのあいだを横断、かつ対角線状に伸びた。
The nave was begun by Walter Le Bec in 1135, and has on either side an arcade of low, round-headed arches. These arches are divided from one another by cylindrical pillars, which have no incised ornamentation, as at Durham or Waltham or Lindisfarne, nor are masked with Perpendicular work, as in the nave of Winchester or in the choir of Gloucester, but rely for effect on severe plainness and great diameter. Above them is seen the dark and cavernous depth of the triforium, and higher yet the clerestory with minute and infrequent openings. Over all broods a stone vault, divided across and diagonally by the chevron-mouldings of heavy vaulting-ribs.
ウエストレイは扉口のそばに腰を下ろして夢中になって建物を観察、巨大な石造物を横切る不思議な光り戯れに見とれた。そのあまり立ち上がって聖堂のなかを歩き出すまでに半時間が経過しまった。
Westray sat down near the door, and was so engrossed in the study of the building and in the strange play of the shafts of sunlight across the massive stonework, that half an hour passed before he rose to walk up the church.
がっしりた障壁が聖歌隊席を身廊からへだてて、一つの聖堂からいわば二つの聖堂を作り出した。ウエストレイが仕切りのドアを開けたとき、四つの声が語りかけくるのを聞いた。見上げると塔を支える四つのアーチが頭上にあった。「アーチは決して眠らない」と一つが叫んだ。「彼らはわれわれの上に背負いきれないほどの重荷を載せた」と別の一つがそれにつづいた。「われわれはその重量を分散する」と三つ目が言い、四つ目は古い繰り返し文句に戻った。「アーチは決して眠らない。決して」
A solid stone screen separates the choir from the nave, making, as it were, two churches out of one; but as Westray opened the doors between them, he heard four voices calling to him, and, looking up, saw above his head the four tower arches. "The arch never sleeps," cried one. "They have bound on us a burden too heavy to be borne," answered another. "We never sleep," said the third; and the fourth returned to the old refrain, "The arch never sleeps, never sleeps."
陽の光のなかでアーチをじっといると、その幅といい細さといい、彼の驚きはいっそう深くなり、主任が建物の沈下や南の壁の不吉な割れ目をあれほどまでに軽視することがますます信じられなくなった。
As he considered them in the daylight, he wondered still more at their breadth and slenderness, and was still more surprised that his Chief had made so light of the settlement and of the ominous crack in the south wall.
聖歌隊席は身廊よりも百四十年後に、華麗な初期イギリス様式で造られた。幾つものランセット窓が、手のこんだ雨押さえ刳形によって二つずつ、三つずつにまとめられ、東端では七つの窓が一つにくくられている。ここには黒っぽい灰色のパーベック石でできた無数の柱身があった。柱頭は精巧な仕上がりを見せえぐりの深い草葉飾りがあり、羽を広げた天使がヴォールト軸を背負い、その上には尖った屋根がのった。
The choir is a hundred and forty years later than the nave, ornate Early English, with a multiplication of lancet-windows which rich hood-mouldings group into twos and threes, and at the east end into seven. Here are innumerable shafts of dark-grey purbeck marble, elaborate capitals, deeply undercut foliage, and broad-winged angels bearing up the vaulting shafts on which rests the sharply-pointed roof.
聖堂のこの部分だけでもカランの宗教的必要を満たすには充分で、堅礼式かミシリア・サンディ(註 在郷軍のメンバーをくじ引きで選ぶ日)のときでもないかぎり、会衆が身廊まであふれることはなかった。聖堂にた人は誰もがゆったりと座ることができ、快適に礼拝することができた。というのも、千五百三十年、ヴィニコウム修道院長によって造られた天蓋付き聖職者席の前には信者席が長々と列をなし並び、緑色のベーズが張られ、真鍮の釘が打たれ、クッションや膝布団、祈祷書を収める箱が占有者の祈りのために備え付けられてたからである。カランで一角の人物たろうとする者は、誰もが金を払ってこの信者席を一つ借りた。しかし宗教に対してさほどの贅沢ができない同じくらい多くの人々には樅板作りの別の席が与えられた。もちろんベーズは張られてないし、膝布団もなく、開き戸には番号もついないけれど、それでもなんら不足はなく、ゆったりと座ることができた。
The spiritual needs of Cullerne were amply served by this portion of the church alone, and, except at confirmations or on Militia Sunday, the congregation never overflowed into the nave. All who came to the minster found there full accommodation, and could indeed worship in much comfort; for in front of the canopied stalls erected by Abbot Vinnicomb in 1530 were ranged long rows of pews, in which green baize and brass nails, cushions and hassocks, and Prayer-Book boxes ministered to the devotion of the occupants. Anybody who aspired to social status in Cullerne rented one of these pews, but for as many as could not afford such luxury in their religion there were provided other seats of deal, which had, indeed, no baize or hassocks, nor any numbers on the doors, but were, for all that, exceedingly appropriate and commodious.
建築家が聖歌隊席にはいると、聖職者席を掃除た事務員は、鷹が獲物をめがけ舞い降りるように彼のほうにむかった。ウエストレイは運命を避けようとはず、それどころかこの老人のおしゃべりから聖堂に関する興味深い事実がられることを期待た。なにしろここはこれから何ヶ月ものあいだ彼の仕事場となるのである。しかし事務員は事物についてよりも人間について話したがった。そして会話はしだいにウエストレイが同居することになった家族のことへと移っいった。
The clerk was dusting the stalls as the architect entered the choir, and made for him at once as the hawk swoops on its quarry. Westray did not attempt to escape his fate, and hoped, indeed, that from the old man's garrulity he might glean some facts of interest about the building, which was to be the scene of his work for many months to come. But the clerk preferred to talk of people rather than of things, and the conversation drifted by easy stages to the family with whom Westray had taken up his abode.
ミスタ・シャーノールが賛嘆べき沈黙を守ったジョウリフ家の先祖の疑惑は、事務員にとってはそれほど神聖な話題ではなかった。彼はオルガン奏者が踏む恐れたところへ突進ゆき、ウエストレイもそれを制止べきだとは感じず、むしろマーチン・ジョウリフとその想像上の主張について話をするよう水をむけたくらいだった。
The doubt as to the Joliffe ancestry, in the discussion of which Mr Sharnall had shown such commendable reticence, was not so sacred to the clerk. He rushed in where the organist had feared to tread, nor did Westray feel constrained to check him, but rather led the talk to Martin Joliffe and his imaginary claims.
「いやはや」と事務員はいった。「わたしが小さい子供の頃でした、マーチンのおっ母さんが兵士と駆け落ちたのは。でもみんなの噂話はようく覚えとります。ただカランの人間は新しもの好きでね。あのときのことも今となっちゃあ昔語り、わたしと主任司祭をのぞいたら、あの話ができるのは一人もおらんでしょう。農場主のジョウリフさんと結婚たとき、彼女はソフィア・フラネリイと名乗ってました。どこで見つけてたんだか誰も知りません。彼は親父の代からヴィドコウム農場に住んたんですよ、マイケル・ジョウリフは。陽気な男で、いつも黄色いズボンに青いベストをとりました。それである日、彼は結婚するいってカランにたんです。ソフィアはブランダマー・アームズで待っとって、二人はこの聖堂で結婚ました。そのとき彼女には三歳になる男の子がおりましてな、自分は未亡人だと言いふらしておったんですが、結婚証明書を見せろいわれても見せることはできないだろうと大勢の連中は考えとりました。しかしたぶん農場主のジョウリフさんは見せろなんて言わなかったんでしょう。さもなきゃ、何もかも承知の上だったんでしょう。すらりとた別嬪さんでしたよ、彼女は。分けへだてなくみんなに声をかけ笑ったと、親父から何度も聞かされました。それに小金を持っとりましてなあ。三ヶ月おきにロンドンにむいて家賃を集めるんだと彼女は言っとりました。戻るたびに目を見張るような新品の服をとるんです。身なりは立派だし、風格みたいなものがただよっとるもんだから、みんなウィドコウムの女王様と呼んどりました。どこからたのか知りませんが、あの人は寄宿学校をとって、楽器も弾きこなせるし歌も見事でした。夏の夜なんか、わたしら若いもんはウィドコウムまで歩いいって農場近くの柵に腰かけ、開いた窓から聞こえくるソフィの歌声を何度も聞きました。ピアノも持っとって、船長と水夫と失恋にまつわる、じんとくるような長い歌をよく歌って、みんな泣きそうになりましたよ。歌を歌っないときは絵を描いてました。女房のやつは彼女が描いた花の絵を持っとりましてね。農場をあきらめんならんなったとき、たくさん売り出されたんですよ。でもミス・ジョウリフはいちばん大きいのを手放そうとはなさらかった。買いたいって連中は多かったんですが、あれはとっおくことにたらしく、今でもあの人の手元にありまさあ。看板みたいにばかでかい絵で、そりゃきれいな花で埋めつくされているんですがね」
"Lor' bless you!" said the clerk, "I was a little boy myself when Martin's mother runned away with the soldier, yet mind well how it was in everybody's mouth. But folks in Cullerne like novelties; it's all old-world talk now, and there ain't one perhaps, beside me and Rector, could tell you _that_ tale. Sophia Flannery her name was when Farmer Joliffe married her, and where he found her no one knew. He lived up at Wydcombe Farm, did Michael Joliffe, where his father lived afore him, and a gay one he was, and dressed in yellow breeches and a blue waistcoat all his time. Well, one day he gave out he was to be married, and came into Cullerne, and there was Sophia waiting for him at the Blandamer Arms, and they were married in this very church. She had a three-year-old boy with her then, and put about she was a widow, though there were many who thought she couldn't show her marriage lines if she'd been asked for them. But p'raps Farmer Joliffe never asked to see 'em, or p'raps he knew all about it. A fine upstanding woman she was, with a word and a laugh for everyone, as my father told me many a time; and she had a bit of money beside. Every quarter, up she'd go to London town to collect her rents, so she said, and every time she'd come back with terrible grand new clothes. She dressed that fine, and had such a way with her, the people called her Queen of Wydcombe. Wherever she come from, she had a boarding-school education, and could play and sing beautiful. Many a time of a summer evening we lads would walk up to Wydcombe, and sit on the fence near the farm, to hear Sophy a-singing through the open window. She'd a pianoforty, too, and would sing powerful long songs about captains and moustachers and broken hearts, till people was nearly fit to cry over it. And when she wasn't singing she was painting. My old missis had a picture of flowers what she painted, and there was a lot more sold when they had to give up the farm. But Miss Joliffe wouldn't part with the biggest of 'em, though there was many would ha' liked to buy it. No, she kep' that one, and has it by her to this day--a picture so big as a signboard, all covered with flowers most beautiful."
「ええ、ましたよ」ウエストレイが口をはさんだ。「ミス・ジョウリフの下宿のわたしの部屋にあるんです」
"Yes, I've seen that," Westray put in; "it's in my room at Miss Joliffe's."
彼は絵のまずさについても、それをはずすつもりでいることも黙った。話し手の芸術的感受性を傷つけたくなかったし、案外と面白くなり出した話の腰を折りたくなかったのである。
He said nothing about its ugliness, or that he meant to banish it, not wishing to wound the narrator's artistic susceptibilities, or to interrupt a story which began to interest him in spite of himself.
「ほら、そうでしょう!」と事務員は言った。「ウィドコウムにあったときは、いちばんいい応接間の、食器棚の上にかかってました。子供のときたんですよ。お袋が春の大掃除の手伝いに農場へ行きましてね。『トム、てごらん』とお袋に言われました。『こんなお花、たことがあるかい。可愛い毛虫がお花を食べようといるよ!』ほら、下の隅っこに描かれている緑色の毛虫のことですよ」
"Well, to be sure!" said the clerk, "it used to hang in the best parlour at Wydcombe over the sideboard; I seed'n there when I was a boy, and my mother was helping spring-clean up at the farm. `Look, Tom,' my mother said to me, `did 'ee ever see such flowers? and such a pritty caterpillar a-going to eat them!' You mind, a green caterpillar down in the corner."
ウエストレイは頷き、事務員は話しつづけた。
Westray nodded, and the clerk went on:
「『ねえ、ミセス・ジョウリフ』ってお袋がソフィアに言いました。『こんなきれいな絵をたら、他の絵なんて見る気がなくなりますわ』ってね。そしたらソフィアは笑って、お袋は絵を見る目があるって言いました。値打ちがないってけちをつける連中もいるけど、売り出したらいつだって五十ポンドか百ポンドかそれ以上の値がつくさ。絵の分かる人のところに持っいけばね。そのときは、絵の具をはねちらかしただけじゃねえかといった連中を笑っやるんだ。そう言っ笑っとりました。あの人はいつも笑って、いつも明るかった。
"`Well, Mrs Joliffe,' says my mother to Sophia, `I never want for to see a more beautiful picture than that.' And Sophia laughed, and said my mother know'd a good picture when she saw one. Some folks 'ud stand her out, she said, that 'tweren't worth much, but she knew she could get fifty or a hundred pound or more for't any day she liked to sell, if she took it to the right people. _Then_ she'd soon have the laugh of those that said it were only a daub; and with that she laughed herself, for she were always laughing and always jolly.
マイケルは元気のいいかみさんが大いに気に入っとって、よく大型二輪馬車でカラン市場に乗りつけて、みんなの注目を集めたり、彼女が途中ですれ違う農夫たちと冗談を交わすのを嬉しそうに聞いとりました。彼女のことはえらく自慢とりましたが、ある土曜日、ブランダマー・ホテルで、かみさんが産んくれた可愛い娘のために乾杯くれと、客の全員に酒をおごったときはもっと得意そうでした。これで子供が二人になったと言いましてな。ソフィアの連れ子を自分のところで実の息子のように育てたんでさあ。
"Michael were well pleased with his strapping wife, and used to like to see the people stare when he drove her into Cullerne Market in the high cart, and hear her crack jokes with the farmers what they passed on the way. Very proud he was of her, and prouder still when one Saturday he stood all comers glasses round at the Blandamer, and bid 'em drink to a pritty little lass what his wife had given him. Now he'd got a brace of 'em, he said; for he'd kep' that other little boy what Sophia brought when she married him, and treated the child for all the world as if he was his very son.
それから一年か二年すると、ウィドコウム・ダウンの丘陵で軍事演習のキャンプが張られましてね。あの夏のことは、ようく覚えとります。ひどく暑い夏で、ジョウイ・ガーランドとわたしはメイヨーズ・ミードの洗羊場で泳ぎの練習をましたから。丘陵にはずらっと白いテントが並び、士官用の食堂テントの前じゃ、夕方ブラスバンドが音楽を演奏するんで。たまに日曜の午後も演奏てました。司祭さんはとんでもねえ迷惑だと大佐に手紙を書きましてね、楽隊のせいで人々が教会にない、『民坐して飲食《のみくい》起《た》て戯る』(註 出エジプト記から)さまは、金の子牛を崇拝するにも等しいと、こう言ったのです。ところが大佐はそんなものに鼻も引っかけやしませんや。で、天気のいい夕方になると、大勢の人が丘陵におりました。娘っ子のなかには、あのクラリネットとバスーンみたいな素敵な音楽は、ウィドコウム大聖堂の階上廊じゃ聞いたことないって、あとで言ってるやつがおりました。
"So 'twas for a year or two, till the practice-camp was put up on Wydcombe Down. I mind that summer well, for 'twere a fearful hot one, and Joey Garland and me taught ourselves to swim in the sheep-wash down in Mayo's Meads. And there was the white tents all up the hillside, and the brass band a-playing in the evenings before the officers' dinner-tent. And sometimes they would play Sunday afternoons too; and Parson were terrible put about, and wrote to the Colonel to say as how the music took the folk away from church, and likened it to the worship of the golden calf, when `the people sat down to eat and drink, and rose up again to play.' But Colonel never took no notice of it, and when 'twas a fine evening there was a mort of people trapesing over the Downs, and some poor lasses wished afterwards they'd never heard no music sweeter than the clar'net and bassoon up in the gallery of Wydcombe Church.
ソフィアも何度もあそこに出かけてました。最初は旦那の腕につかまっ歩いとりましたが、それから他の人と腕を組ん歩くようになりました。ビャクシンの茂みの陰で兵士と腰を下ろしとったという噂もありました。あいつらが移動たのは聖ミカエル祭前夜のことですよ。聖ミカエル祭(註 九月二十九日)の前日にウィドコウム農場で食ったガチョウはさぞかしまずかったでしょうな。というのは兵士がなくなったとき、ソフィアもなくなったからなんで。マイケルも農場も子供たちも捨てて、誰にもさよならを言わなかったんです。子供ベッドにいる赤ん坊にさえね。軍曹と駆け落ちたんだって言われてますが、本当のところは分かりゃません。農場主のジョウリフさんは彼女を捜して、ひょっとしたら居場所を突き止めたのかも知れませんが、そんなことは一言も言いませんでした。彼女はウィドコウムに戻りませんでしたよ」
"Sophia was there, too, a good few times, walking round first on her husband's arm, and afterwards on other people's; and some of the boys said they had seen her sitting with a redcoat up among the juniper-bushes. 'Twas Michaelmas Eve before they moved the camp, and 'twas a sorry goose was eat that Michaelmas Day at Wydcombe Farm; for when the soldiers went, Sophia went too, and left Michael and the farm and the children, and never said good-bye to anyone, not even to the baby in the cot. 'Twas said she ran off with a sergeant, but no one rightly knew; and if Farmer Joliffe made any search and found out, he never told a soul; and she never come back to Wydcombe.
「彼女はウィドコウムに戻りませんでしたよ」彼はため息のようなものをつきながら声をひそめてそう言った。長らく忘れた農場主ジョウリフ一家の崩壊に心を動かされたのだろう。いや、次のようにつづけたところを見ると、自分が被った損害のことしか考えなかったのかも知れない。「そうそう、あの人は貧乏な人に煙草を一オンス分け与えたり、労働者の小屋にお茶を一ポンド送ったりとりました。きれいな服を買ったら、お古は人にあげなさるんで。女房のやつは、あいつのおっ母さんがソフィ・ジョウリフからもらった毛皮の襟巻きをいまだに持っとります。他の点はともかく、まあ、気前よく人に金をやる人でしたな。農場で働いいる連中の中に、彼女の悪口を言うやつは一人もませんでした。行かれて喜んだ人間は一人もませんでしたよ。
"She never come back to Wydcombe," he said under his breath, with something that sounded like a sigh. Perhaps the long-forgotten break-up of Farmer Joliffe's home had touched him, but perhaps he was only thinking of his own loss, for he went on: "Ay, many's the time she would give a poor fellow an ounce of baccy, and many's the pound of tea she sent to a labourer's cottage. If she bought herself fine clothes, she'd give away the old ones; my missis has a fur tippet yet that her mother got from Sophy Joliffe. She was free with her money, whatever else she mid have been. There wasn't a labourer on the farm but what had a good word for her; there wasn't one was glad to see her back turned.
かわいそうにマイケルは、口数の多い男じゃねえんですが、はじめのうちひどく取り乱しました。黄色いズボンと青いチョッキは相変わらずてましたが、仕事する気力がなくなり、市場にもきちんきちんと行くべきところが、足が遠ざかるようになりました。ただ子供たちをいっそうかわいがるようになったようでした――父親を知らねえマーチンと、母親を知らねえ赤ん坊のフェミーですよ。わたしの知るかぎり、ソフィーは子供に会い戻ったことはありませんでした。しかしそれから二十年後にわたしはこの目で彼女をましたよ。ビーコン・ヒルの定期市へ馬を売り行ったときのことでさあ。
"Poor Michael took on dreadful at the first, though he wasn't the man to say much. He wore his yellow breeches and blue waistcoat just the same, but lost heart for business, and didn't go to market so reg'lar as he should. Only he seemed to stick closer by the children--by Martin that never know'd his father, and little Phemie that never know'd her mother. Sophy never come back to visit 'em by what I could learn; but once I seed her myself twenty years later, when I took the hosses over to sell at Beacon Hill Fair.
あの日も陰気な日でした。というのはマイケルがはじめて持ち物を売って金を作らにゃならんかった日だったんです。かわいそうに旦那さん、その頃はげっそりやつれてました。以前と違って青いチョッキと黄色いズボンにたるみができて、おまけに服じたいがすっかり色褪せしまいましてな。
"That was a black day, too, for 'twas the first time Michael had to raise the wind by selling aught of his'n. He'd got powerful thin then, had poor master, and couldn't fill the blue waistcoat and yellow breeches like he used to, and _they_ weren't nothing so gay by then themselves neither.
『トム』と旦那さんが言いました――つまりわたしのことですよ――『この馬どもをビーコン・ヒルに連れ行って、できるだけ高く売っこい。金がいるんだ』
"`Tom,' he said--that's me, you know--`take these here hosses over to Beacon Hill, and sell 'em for as much as 'ee can get, for I want the money.'
『なんですって、お父さん、いちばんいい輓馬《ばんば》を売るの?』フェミー嬢ちゃんが言いました――そばにいらっしゃったんで――『ホワイト・フェイスとストライク・ア・ライトはいちばんいい輓馬なんだから売らないで!』すると馬が顔をあげるんですよ。お嬢ちゃんに名前を呼ばれたことがちゃあんと分かるんですな。
"`What, sell the best team, dad!' says Miss Phemie--for she was standing by--`you'll never sell the best team with White-face and old Strike-a-light!' And the hosses looked up, for they know'd their names very well when she said 'em.
『そんなに大騒ぎすることはないよ、おまえ』旦那さんが言いました。『受胎告知(註 三月二十五日)の祭がたら、また買い戻すから』
"`Don't 'ee take on, lass,' he said; `we'll buy 'em back again come Lady Day.'
わたしは馬を連れ行きました。旦那さんがなぜ金を必要とたのか、ようく知っとりました。マーチンが借金をしこたま首にぶらさげてオックスフォードから戻ったんです。農場の仕事に手も貸さないで、自分はブランダマー家の人間なんだとか、フォーディングの屋敷も土地も本来なら自分のものになるはずなんだと言いふらしとったんでさあ。今調査をてるとか言って、あちこちをほっつき歩き、時間と金をさんざんつぎこんでましたよ、益体《やくたい》もない調査とやらに。ありゃあ陰気な日でした。ビーコン・ヒルに行くと、大降りの雨だし、芝生はぐちゃぐちゃでした。馬どもはずぶ濡れで、しょげた顔つきなんですわ。売られることが分かったんでしょう。そんなこんなで午後になりましたが、どっちの馬にも買い手はつきません。『お気の毒な旦那さんだ』わたしは馬どもに言いましたよ、『このまま帰るても、なんて言い訳たらいいのかねえ』って。でもね、馬どもと別れ別れにならんでいいんだと思うと、わたしはうれしかったですよ。
"And so I took 'em over, and knew very well why he wanted the money; for Mr Martin had come back from Oxford, wi' a nice bit of debt about his neck, and couldn't turn his hand to the farm, but went about saying he was a Blandamer, and Fording and all the lands belonged to he by right. 'Quiries he was making, he said, and gadded about here and there, spending a mort of time and money in making 'quiries that never came to nothing. 'Twas a black day, that day, and a thick rain falling at Beacon Hill, and all the turf cut up terrible. The poor beasts was wet through, too, and couldn't look their best, because they knowed they was going to be sold; and so the afternoon came, and never a bid for one of 'em. `Poor old master!' says I to the horses, `what'll 'ee say when we get back again?' And yet I was glad-like to think me and they weren't going to part.
わたしらは雨の中に突っ立っとりました。農夫や商人はわたしらをちらとて、なにも言わずに通り過ぎいきました。そのときですよ、誰かがこっちにやってくる思ったら、ソフィア・ジョウリフじゃねえですか。最後にたときから一歳だって歳なんか取っちゃないような様子でしたな。あの日の午後、わたしらが目にた中で、朗らかだったものといったら、あの人の顔だけでした。生き生きて陽気なのはちっとも変わっちゃません。大きなボタンの付いた黄色い雨外套をて、彼女が通るとみんな振り返ってじろじろ見るんです。彼女といっしょに馬喰《ばくろう》が歩いてましてね、人々が目を見張るたびに、彼女のほうを誇らしそうにてました。ちょうどマイケルが馬車で彼女をカラン市場に連れ行ったときと同じように。彼女は馬には目もくれませんでしたが、わたしの顔をまじまじとましてね。通り過ぎてから頭をめぐらしてもう一度見るんですよ。それから戻っました。
"Well, there we was a-standing in the rain, and the farmers and the dealers just give us a glimpse, and passed by without a word, till I see someone come along, and that was Sophia Joliffe. She didn't look a year older nor when I met her last, and her face was the only cheerful thing we saw that afternoon, as fresh and jolly as ever. She wore a yellow mackintosh with big buttons, and everybody turned to measure her up as she passed. There was a horse-dealer walking with her, and when the people stared, he looked at her just so proud as Michael used to look when he drove her in to Cullerne Market. She didn't take any heed of the hosses, but she looked hard at me, and when she was passed turned her head to have another look, and then she come back.
『おまえさん、トム・ジャナウエイじゃないかい』と彼女は言いました。『ウィドコウム農場で働いたんじゃないかい』
"`Bain't you Tom Janaway,' says she, `what used to work up to Wydcombe Farm?'
『へえ、そうです』とわたしは言いましたが、よそよそしい口調を使っやりました。旦那さんにあんな仕打ちをおいて、こんなに陽気な面《つら》てるなんて腹が立ちましたからな。
"`Ay, that I be,' says I, but stiff-like, for it galled me to think what she'd a-done for master, and yet could look so jolly with it all.
彼女はわたしの不機嫌を無視尋ねました。『これは誰の馬なの』
"She took no note that I were glum, but `Whose hosses is these?' she asked.
『あなたの旦那さんのですよ、奥さん』わたしは思いきって言っやりました。鼻っ柱をへし折ってやろうと思って。ところがどうですか、彼女はそんなこと、屁とも思わねえようで『わたしのどの旦那さ』ときました。そしてげらげら笑い出して、横にいる馬喰をつついてました。男のほうは彼女を絞め殺したそうな顔をてましたがね。彼女はそれも気にかけませんでした。『どうしてマイケルは馬を売りたいんだい』
"`Your husband's, mum,' I made bold to say, thinking to take her down a peg. But, lor'! she didn't care a rush for that, but `Which o' my husbands?' says she, and laughed fit to bust, and poked the horse-dealer in the side. He looked as if he'd like to throttle her, but she didn't mind that neither. `What for does Michael want to sell his hosses?'
わたしは毒気を抜かれちまいましてね。もうやりこめようなんて気はなくなって、ありのままに事情を話したんです。その忌まわしい日一日ずっと突っ立ったのに、買い手がつかねえってことも。彼女は何も訊きませんでしたが、マーチン坊ちゃんとフェミー嬢ちゃんのことを話したときは、目がきらっ光りましてな。それから急に馬喰のほうを振りむい言いました。
"And then I lost my pluck, and didn't think to humble her any more, but just told her how things was, and how I'd stood the blessed day, and never got a bid. She never asked no questions, but I see her eyes twinkle when I spoke of Master Martin and Miss Phemie; and then she turned sharp to the horse-dealer and said:
『ジョン。こりゃいい馬だよ。安く買って明日また売ろうじゃないか』
"`John, these is fine horses; you buy these cheap-like, and we can sell 'em again to-morrow.'
そしたらあの野郎、毒づきがって、老いぼれの駑馬《どば》じゃねえか、犬の餌にもなりゃねえって言うんですよ。
"Then he cursed and swore, and said the hosses was old scraws, and he'd be damned afore he'd buy such hounds'-meat.
『ジョン』彼女は落ち着き払っ言いました。『レディの前で毒づくなんてマナーがいいとはいえないよ。こりゃいい馬なんだから、買っくれよ』
"`John,' says she, quite quiet, `'tain't polite to swear afore ladies. These here is good hosses, and I want you to buy 'em.'
男はまた毒づきましたが、彼女は男のあしらい方をちゃんと心得いるようでした。えらく笑っちゃなさるが、顔にはおそろしく断固とた表情を浮かべいるんで。男はだんだん静かになって、彼女に話をせるようになりました。
"Then he swore again, but she'd got his measure, and there was a mighty firm look in her face, for all she laughed so; and by degrees he quieted down and let her talk.
『この四頭をいくらで売りたいんだい、おまえさん』と彼女は言いました。わたしは八十ポンドと言おうかと思いました。昔のよしみでひょっとしたらそのくらいは出しくれるんじゃねえかと考えてね。でもそれで取引がご破算になっちまうのも怖くて、言い出せないでたんです。『ほら、答えなさいよ。いくらなの。口がきけないの。おまえさんが値段をつけないなら、あたしがつけるよ。ジョン、百ポンドつけやりなさいよ』
"`How much do you want for the four of 'em, young man?' she says; and I had a mind to say eighty pounds, thinking maybe she'd rise to that for old times' sake, but didn't like to say so much for fear of spoiling the bargain. `Come,' she says, `how much? Art thou dumb? Well, if thou won't fix the price, I'll do it for 'ee. Here, John, you bid a hundred for this lot.'
男は馬鹿みたいに目を剥きましたが、何も言いませんでした。
"He stared stupid-like, but didn't speak.
そうしたら彼女がきつく睨み付けて、
"Then she look at him hard.
『百ポンドでなきゃだめよ』彼女は低いけれども、きっぱりた声で言いました。で、男が『おい、百ポンド出すぜ』と言いました。ところが、わたしが『売った』という前に、彼女がつづけてこう言ったんですよ。『だめ――この若者はだめだと言ってるわ。顔を見りゃ分かるのよ。それじゃ足りないって思っいる。百二十ポンドでどうだって言っなさいよ』
"`You've got to do it,' she says, speaking low, but very firm; and out he comes with, `Here, I'll give 'ee a hundred.' But before I had time to say `Done,' she went on: `No--this young man says no; I can see it in his face; he don't think 'tis enough; you try him with a hundred and twenty.'
男は魔物に魅入られたみたいに、えらくおとなしく『じゃあ、百二十そう』と言いました。
"'Twas as if he were overlooked, for he says quite mild, `Well, I'll give 'ee a hundred and twenty.'
『ああ、そのほうがいいわ』と彼女が言いました。『そのほうがいいって彼は言っいるよ』彼女は胸元から小さい革の財布を取り出して、雨が入らねえように雨外套のすその下に隠しながら、二十枚ほど新札を数えて、わたしの手に握らました。それが入ったところにはもっとたくさんの札束がありました。財布にお札がびっしり詰まっいるのが見えたんでさあ。わたしがそれをいるのに気づくと、彼女はもう一枚取り出してわたしに寄こすんで。『こりゃおまえさんにやるよ。おまえさんに幸運が訪れますように。それで好い人のために土産でも買っやるんだね、トム・ジャナウエイ。それから、ソフィ・フラネリイは昔の友達を忘れるような女だなんて言いふらしじゃないよ』
"`Ay, that's better,' says she; `he says that's better.' And she takes out a little leather wallet from her bosom, holding it under the flap of her waterproof so that the rain shouldn't get in, and counts out two dozen clean banknotes, and puts 'em into my hand. There was many more where they come from, for I could see the book was full of 'em; and when she saw my eyes on them, she takes out another, and gives it me, with, `There's one for thee, and good luck to 'ee; take that, and buy a fairing for thy sweetheart, Tom Janaway, and never say Sophy Flannery forgot an old friend.'
『奥様、ご親切にありがとうございます』とわたしは言いましたよ。『ご親切にありがとうございます。あとでもったいないことをたなんてお思いになりませんように。家賃が今もきちんきちんと入ってきなさればいいですなあ』
"`Thank 'ee kindly, mum,' says I; `thank 'ee kindly, and may you never miss it! I hope your rents do still come in reg'lar, mum.'
彼女は大声で笑って、その点は心配おしでないよと言いました。それから彼女は小僧を呼んで、小僧がホワイト・フェイスとストライク・ア・ライトとジェニーとカトラーを連れ行って、わたしがお休みなさい言う前に、馬喰もソフィーもみんななくなっちまいました。彼女は二度とそのあたりにあらわれたことはありません――少なくともわたしはたことがないですな。ただ噂であのあと二十年ほど生きて、ベリトン競馬のときに溢血をおこし死んだってのは聞きましたがね」
"She laughed out loud, and said there was no fear of that; and then she called a lad, and he led off White-face and Strike-a-light and Jenny and the Cutler, and they was all gone, and the horse-dealer and Sophia, afore I had time to say good-night. She never come into these parts again--at least, I never seed her; but I heard tell she lived a score of years more after that, and died of a broken blood-vessel at Beriton Races."
彼は少しだけ聖歌隊席の奥に進み、掃除をつづけたが、ウエストレイはあとを追って、また話を始めるきっかけを与えた。
He moved a little further down the choir, and went on with his dusting; but Westray followed, and started him again.
「家に帰ってから何が起きたんです?農場主ジョウリフがなんて言ったのか、まだお話になっませんよ。それにどうして農場をやめて教会事務員になったのかも」
"What happened when you got back? You haven't told me what Farmer Joliffe said, nor how you came to leave farming and turn clerk."
老人は額をぬぐった。
The old man wiped his forehead.
「そのことは話すつもりがなかったんですがなあ」と彼は言った。「思い出すと今でも冷や汗がますわい。しかしお聞きなりたいというならお聞かましょう。みんながなくなったとき、わたしはあまりの幸運にほとんど目まいがましたよ。で、夢じゃないことを確かめるために主の祈りを唱えました。しかし夢じゃありませんでした。それでチョッキの裏地に切れこみを入れ、札束を中に落としたんです。彼女がわたしにくれた一枚を除いて。そいつだけはズボンの時計入れポケットにつっこみました。日が暮れて、寒いし濡れてるし、感覚がなくなっましてな。なにしろ雨の中にずっと立ちっぱなしで、一日じゅう飲み食いなかったんですから。
"I wasn't going to tell 'ee that," he said, "for it do fair make I sweat still to think o' it; but you can have it if you like. Well, when they was gone, I was nigh dazed with such a stroke o' luck, and said the Lord's Prayer to see I wasn't dreaming. But 'twas no such thing, and so I cut a slit in the lining of my waistcoat, and dropped the notes in, all except the one she give me for myself, and that I put in my fob-pocket. 'Twas getting dark, and I felt numb with cold and wet, what with standing so long in the rain and not having bite nor sup all day.
あそこは吹きさらしの場所なんですわ、ビーコン・ヒルってのは。あの日は道がぬかるんで、編み上げ靴に水がしみこみ歩くとがぷがぷ音がました。雨はひっきりなしに降って、仮小屋の外を照らしはじめたナフサランプにしぶきが飛びこみ、ぱちぱちはぜるんですよ。ある長いテントの外にやたらとぎらぎら輝く灯りがともってまして、中から油で炒めたタマネギの匂いがただよって、腹の虫が叫びたてました。『お願いますよ、ご主人様、お願いますよ!』ってね。
"'Tis a bleak place, Beacon Hill, and 'twas so soft underfoot that day the water'd got inside my boots, till they fair bubbled if I took a step. The rain was falling steady, and sputtered in the naphtha-lamps that they was beginning to light up outside the booths. There was one powerful flare outside a long tent, and from inside there come a smell of fried onions that made my belly cry `Please, master, please!'
『ようし』とわたしは腹の虫に言っやりました。『ちゃんと満腹にやるからな。おまえをからっぽのままウィドコウムには帰らんぞ』それでテントに入ったんですが、いや、中はあったかいし、明るいし、男は煙草を吹かし、女は笑い、料理の匂いがたまんねえんで。架台の上に板をのっけたテーブルがテントの中に並べられておりましてね。その脇には長いベンチがあって、みんなが食べたり飲んだりしとりました。部屋の一方の端には売り台が横に延びとって、その上で錫の皿が湯気を立ているんでさあ。豚足、ソーセージ、胃袋、ベーコン、牛肉、カリフラワー、キャベツ、玉葱、ブラッドソーセージ、それに干し葡萄入りプディング。お札を小銭に換えるにはちょうどいい機会だと思いました。ポケットの中で木の葉になっちまう妖精の金じゃなくて、本物かどうか確かめることもできるってんでね。それでわたしは近づいて牛肉とジャック・プディング(註 ブラッドソーセージのことか)の皿を注文、お札を差し出しました。娘さんが――カウンターの後ろにたのは娘さんでした――それを手に取ってじっと見つめ、それからわたしをじっと見るんですよ。なにせずぶ濡れで泥だらけでしたからな。娘さんはお札を店のおやじのところに持っ行って、おやじはそいつを女房に見せました。女房はそれを光り透かし、みんなで議論を始めました。それから樽に印を付けた物品税の收税吏に見せたんです。
"`Yes, my lad,' I said to un, `I'm darned if I don't humour 'ee; thou shan't go back to Wydcombe empty.' So in I step, and found the tent mighty warm and well lit, with men smoking and women laughing, and a great smell of cooking. There were long tables set on trestles down the tent, and long benches beside 'em, and folks eating and drinking, and a counter cross the head of the room, and great tin dishes simmering a-top of it--trotters and sausages and tripe, bacon and beef and colliflowers, cabbage and onions, blood-puddings and plum-duff. It seemed like a chance to change my banknote, and see whether 'twere good and not elf-money that folks have found turn to leaves in their pocket. So up I walks, and bids 'em gie me a plate of beef and jack-pudding, and holds out my note for't. The maid--for 'twas a maid behind the counter--took it, and then she looks at it and then at me, for I were very wet and muddy; and then she carries it to the gaffer, and he shows it to his wife, who holds it up to the light, and then they all fall to talking, and showed it to a 'cise-man what was there marking down the casks.
近くに座った人は何事だろうとじろじろ見るし、こっちは顔が熱くなって、お札なんかうっちゃってさっさとウィドコウムに帰りたくなりました。でも收税吏はまともな金だと請け合っくれたに違いありません。おやじがソブリン金貨四枚と十九シリングを持っ戻って、お辞儀ながらこう言いましたから。
"The people sitting nigh saw what was up, and fell to staring at me till I felt hot enough, and lief to leave my note where 'twas, and get out and back to Wydcombe. But the 'cise-man must have said 'twere all right, for the gaffer comes back with four gold sovereigns and nineteen shillings, and makes a bow and says:
『お客さん、飲み物を持っましょうか』
"`Your servant, sir; can I give you summat to drink?'
わたしはどんな酒があるのだろうとまわりをました。お札が本物だと分かって、そりゃあ嬉しかったですな。おやじが言いました。
"I looked round to see what liquor there was, being main glad all the while to find the note were good; and he says:
『ミルク入りラム酒は元気がつきますよ。熱いミルク入りラム酒をお試しくだせ
"`Rum and milk is very helping, sir; try the rum and milk hot.'
それでミルク入りラム酒を一パイントもらって、いちばん近くのテーブルにつきました。わたしがとっつかまるのを見ようと待ちかまえてた連中は場所を空けくれまして、御前様を見るてえにわたしをとりました。わたしは牛肉の皿をおかわり、ミルク入りラム酒をもう一杯飲み、パイプをふかしました。ウィドコウム農場に夜遅く戻っても札びらが二十枚以上あるんだから叱られやしないと思いながらね。
"So I took a pint of rum and milk, and sat down at the nighest table, and the people as were waiting to see me took up, made room now, and stared as if I'd been a lord. I had another plate o' beef, and another rum-and-milk, and then smoked a pipe, knowing they wouldn't make no bother of my being late that night at Wydcombe, when I brought back two dozen banknotes.
肉と酒のおかげで人心地がついて、パイプとテントの暖かさで服が乾き湿った感じがなくなりました。編み上げ靴の中はもうじめじめちゃおりません。一緒になった連中も愉快だし、育ちのいい商人も何人かそばに座っました。
"The meat and drink heartened me, and the pipe and the warmth of the tent seemed to dry my clothes and take away the damp, and I didn't feel the water any longer in my boots. The company was pleasant, too, and some very genteel dealers sitting near.
『旦那の健康に乾杯』一人がグラスを上げてわたしに言いました。『心から敬意を表しやすぜ。あの連中、札びらなんて見慣れてねえんで、そいで旦那のお札にちょいとたまげちまったのさ。けど、おりゃあ、旦那をたとたん、ダチ公に言ったんだ。『おい、あの紳士はおれらのお仲間だぜ。間違いねえ、御大尽様よ』ってね。入った瞬間に立派な紳士ってたあ分かりやしたぜ』
"`My respec's to you, sir,' says one, holding up his glass to me--`best respec's. These pore folk isn't used to the flimsies, and was a bit surprised at your paper-money; but directly I see you, I says to my friends, "Mates, that gentleman's one of us; that's a monied man, if ever I see one." I knew you for a gentleman the minute you come in.'
そんな具合におだてられちゃいまして、お札一枚でこんなに騒ぐんなら、ポケットいっぱいの札束を持っいることを知ったら何て言うだろうと思いましたよ。しかし何も言いませんでした。ただその気になりゃあ、このテントの半分を買い占めることができるんだと思ってくすっと笑いましたがね。そのあとでわたしは連中に酒をおごり、おごり返され、ひどくいい気分で一晩を過ごしたってわけで――しかもわたしら、親密な仲になって、相手が名誉を重んじる立派な人たちだって分かると、わたしも札束を持って、いっしょにお付き合いいただく資格がちゃんとあるってところを見せやったんだから、なおさらいい気分でした。連中は敬意を表してさらに乾杯くれたんですが、そのうちの一人が、今飲んでる酒はわたしみたいな紳士にふるまうにゃ、ふさわしくないって言って、自分のポケットから小瓶を取り出し、わたしのグラスをいっぱいにくれたんですよ。その人の親父がウオータールーの戦いがあった年に買った銘酒なんだそうで。いや、これが強いの何のって、飲んだら目から火が出るようなしろもんでした。でもわたしは平気な顔で飲みましたよ。古酒の味が分からねえなんて思われたくなかったですからな。
"So I was flattered like, and thought if they made so much o' one banknote, what'd they say to know I'd got a pocket full of them? But didn't speak nothing, only chuckled a bit to think I could buy up half the tent if I had a mind to. After that I stood 'em drinks, and they stood me, and we passed a very pleasant evening--the more so because when we got confidential, and I knew they were men of honour, I proved that I was worthy to mix with such by showing 'em I had a packet of banknotes handy. They drank more respec's, and one of them said as how the liquor we were swallowing weren't fit for such a gentleman as me; so he took a flask out o' his pocket, and filled me a glass of his own tap, what his father 'ud bought in the same year as Waterloo. 'Twas powerful strong stuff that, and made me blink to get it down; but I took it with a good face, not liking to show I didn't know old liquor when it come my way.
わたしらはテントの中がむっとてナフサランプの光りが煙草の煙でぼやけちまうまで座っとりました。外はまだ雨が降っとって、屋根を激しくたたく音が聞こえました。屋根の粗布のへこんだところからは水が染みてぽたぽたたたり落ちました。酔っぱらったやつらのなかには、声を荒げて言い争う者もありましたな。わたしも声が他人みたいになっちまうし、頭がふらふらゃべることもままならねえありさまで、こりゃあ限界まで飲んだかなと思いました。そうしたら鐘が鳴って、收税吏が『閉店だ』と叫び売り台のうしろのおやじが『さあ、今日はこれでおしめえですぜ。ぐっすりお休みくだせよ。女王様万歳、明日も楽しくお会いできますように』それでみんな立ち上がって、外套の襟を耳まで立てて、外にました。五人ほどへべれけになっちまって、架台の下の芝生に一晩寝かされましたがね。
"So we sat till the tent was very close, and them hissing naphtha-lamps burnt dim with tobacco-smoke. 'Twas still raining outside, for you could hear the patter heavy on the roof; and where there was a belly in the canvas, the water began to come through and drip inside. There was some rough talking and wrangling among folk who had been drinking; and I knew I'd had as much as I could carry myself, 'cause my voice sounded like someone's else, and I had to think a good bit before I could get out the words. 'Twas then a bell rang, and the 'size-man called out, `Closing time,' and the gaffer behind the counter said, `Now, my lads, good-night to 'ee; hope the fleas won't bite 'ee. God save the Queen, and give us a merry meeting to-morrow.' So all got up, and pulled their coats over their ears to go out, except half a dozen what was too heavy, and was let lie for the night on the grass under the trestles.
わたしは足もとがふらついたんですが、友達が両側から腕を取っ支えくれました。とっても親切な連中でしてな。わたしは眠いし、外に出ると目まいがちまいました。わたしがどこに住んいる告げると、連中は心配するな、送ってってやる、畑をつっきればウィドコウムまで近道できるって言うんでさあ。出発てからちっと暗いところに入りこみましてね。で、次の瞬間何かに顔をぶん殴られたんですよ。気がつい起きたら、若い雌牛がわたしの臭いを嗅いどりました。真昼間になっとって、わたしは生け垣の根本で、アルムの花に囲まれて寝っ転がっとりました。びしょびしょに濡れて泥まみれですわ。(粘土質の土だったんですな)おまけに頭はまだ少しだけぼうっとてるし、恥ずかしいかぎりでしたわい。ですが旦那さんのために取引を成立たことや、チョッキに隠した金のことを思い出して気を取り直しました。で、札束に手を伸ばして、濡れてだめになっないか確かめようとたんです。
"I couldn't walk very firm myself, but my friends took me one under each arm; and very kind of them it was, for when we got into the open air, I turned sleepy and giddy-like. I told 'em where I lived to, and they said never fear, they'd see me home, and knew a cut through the fields what'd take us to Wydcombe much shorter. We started off, and went a bit into the dark; and then the very next thing I know'd was something blowing in my face, and woke up and found a white heifer snuffing at me. 'Twas broad daylight, and me lying under a hedge in among the cuckoo-pints. I was wet through, and muddy (for 'twas a loamy ditch), and a bit dazed still, and sore ashamed; but when I thought of the bargain I'd made for master, and of the money I'd got in my waistcoat, I took heart, and reached in my hand to take out the notes, and see they weren't wasted with the wet.
ところがそこに札束がねえんで――いや、一枚もねえんですよ。チョッキをひっくり返して裏地を破い調べたんですがね。わたしがたところはビーコン・ヒルから半マイルしか離れませんでした。それでさっそく市のあったところへ引き返したんですが、前の晩の友達は見つからないし、酒屋のテントの親父に訊いても、そんなやつらたことねえと、こう言うんですわい。わたしは一日中あっちこっちを探し回って、ついにはみんなに笑われちまいました。何しろ前の晩は酒をかっくらって野宿はするし、一銭残ら盗まれたせいで何も食ってねえし、えらく取り乱した様子をてましたからな。お巡りさんに報告たら記録にゃつけくれましたが、そのあいだもわたしの顔や、チョッキの下から垂れ下がっいる破れた裏地を見つめるんですよ。それをて、お巡りさんが、こりゃあただの与太話だ、こいつまだ酔いが残ってるな、と思ってることが分かりました。あきらめて家に帰ろうとたときにはもう暗くなっとりました。
"But there was no notes there--no, not a bit of paper, for all I turned my waistcoat inside out, and ripped up the lining. 'Twas only half a mile from Beacon Hill that I was lying, and I soon made my way back to the fair-ground, but couldn't find my friends of the evening before, and the gaffer in the drinking-tent said he couldn't remember as he'd ever seen any such. I spent the livelong day searching here and there, till the folks laughed at me, because I looked so wild with drinking the night before, and with sleeping out, and with having nothing to eat; for every penny was took from me. I told the constable, and he took it all down, but I see him looking at me the while, and at the torn lining hanging out under my waistcoat, and knew he thought 'twas only a light tale, and that I had the drink still in me. 'Twas dark afore I give it up, and turned to go back.
ビーコン・ヒルからウィドコウムまで近道てもたっぷり七マイルあります。わたしはくたくたに疲れたのと、腹が減ったのと、恥ずかしいのとで、プラウドさんの水車小屋を見下ろす橋の上で半時間ほど足を止めました。あそこに飛びこんで死んじまおうかなと思いながらね。でもふんぎりがつかねえで、結局ウィドコウムに帰ったんで。みなさん寝ようとするところでしたな。事情を話してるあいだ、農場主のマイケルもマーチン坊ちゃんもフェミー嬢ちゃんも幽霊を見るみたいにわたしをてましたよ。でも馬を買ったのがソフィー・ジョウリフだということは言いませんでした。マイケルは何も言わず、ただもう呆然としてました。フェミー嬢ちゃんは泣いとりました。しかしマーチン坊ちゃんは、そんなの作り話だ、わたしが金を盗んだんだ、お巡りさんを呼ぶべきだと、こう怒鳴るんで。
"'Tis seven mile good by the nigh way from Beacon Hill to Wydcombe; and I was dog-tired, and hungry, and that shamed I stopped a half-hour on the bridge over Proud's mill-head, wishing to throw myself in and ha' done with it, but couldn't bring my mind to that, and so went on, and got to Wydcombe just as they was going to bed. They stared at me, Farmer Michael, and Master Martin, and Miss Phemie, as if I was a spirit, while I told my tale; but I never said as how 'twas Sophia Joliffe as had bought the horses. Old Michael, he said nothing, but had a very blank look on his face, and Miss Phemie was crying; but Master Martin broke out saying 'twas all make-up, and I'd stole the money, and they must send for a constable.
『嘘だ』と坊ちゃんは言いました。『こいつは悪党だ。しかも見え透いた嘘をつく大馬鹿者だよ。誰が信じるものか、どこぞの女が七十ポンドでも高い馬に百二十ポンドも払ったなんて。その人は誰だい。知ってる人かい。そんな人なら市にた人が大勢覚えいるだろうよ。ポケットに札束をいっぱい詰めこんで、馬を倍の値段で買い取る人なんてめったにないからな』
"`'Tis lies,' he said. `This fellow's a rogue, and too great a fool even to make up a tale that'll hang together. Who's going to believe a woman 'ud buy the team, and give a hundred and twenty pounds in notes for hosses that 'ud be dear at seventy pounds? Who was the woman? Did 'ee know her? There must be many in the fair 'ud know such a woman. They ain't so common as go about with their pockets full of banknotes, and pay double price for hosses what they buy.'
買っくれた人のこたあ、ようく知っおりましたが、農場主のジョウリフさんをこれ以上悲しまたくないと思って、その名前は口にたくなかったんです。だから何も言わずに黙っとりました。
"I knew well enough who'd bought 'em, but didn't want to give her name for fear of grieving Farmer Joliffe more nor he was grieved already, so said nothing, but held my peace.
そうしたら農場主が言いました。『トム、わたしはおまえを信じるよ。三十年の付き合いだが、おまえが嘘をついたことはなかった。今もおまえを信じいる。しかしその女の名前を知っいるなら教えくれないか。知らないとしても、どんななりをたか、話しくれ。そうすりゃ誰か見当がつくかも知れん』
"Then the farmer says: `Tom, I believe 'ee; I've know'd 'ee thirty year, and never know'd 'ee tell a lie, and I believe 'ee now. But if thou knows her name, tell it us, and if thou doesn't know, tell us what she looked like, and maybe some of us 'll guess her.'
けれども、それでもわたしは黙っとったので、とうとうマーチンがこんなことを言いました。
"But still I didn't say aught till Master Martin goes on:
『女の名前を白状しろ。本当に馬を買ったなら、名前くらいちゃんと知ってるはずだ。父さん、甘やかしちゃだめですよ、こんな馬鹿の話を信じたりて。お巡りさんを呼ぶぞ。さあ、名前を言え
"`Out with her name. He must know her name right enough, if there ever was a woman as did buy the hosses; and don't you be so soft, father, as to trust such fool's tales. We'll get a constable for 'ee. Out with her name, I say.'
わたしもそんな乱暴な口のきき方にはむかつきましてな。苦しんいるお父さんは許しくださったというのに。それで言っやったんです。
"Then I was nettled like, at his speaking so rough, when the man that suffered had forgiven me, and said:
『ええ、名前は知ってまさあ。お聞きなりてえとおっしゃるなら。奥様ですよ』
"`Yes, I know her name right enough, if 'ee will have it. 'Twas the missis.'
『奥様だと?』坊ちゃんは言いました。『どこの奥様だ?』
"`Missis?' he says; `what missis?'
『坊ちゃんのお母さんでさあ。男といっしょでしたがね。ここをいったときの相手じゃありませんでした。奥様がそいつに馬を買わたんで』
"`Your mother,' says I. `She was with a man, but he weren't the man she runned away from here with, and she made he buy the team.'
マーチン坊ちゃんはもう何も言いませんでした。フェミー嬢ちゃんは泣きつづけとりました。しかし旦那さんの顔はいっそう虚ろになりました。そしてえらく静かな声でこう言いました。
"Master Martin didn't say any more, and Miss Phemie went on crying; but there was a blanker look come on old master's face, and he said very quiet:
『もういい。わたしはおまえを信じいるし、今回のことは大目に見る。百ポンドなくそうがなくすまいが、今となっちゃあたいした違いはない。これが運命とあきらめるさ。おまえの話した場所でなくさなかったとしても、どこか別の場所でなくしただろうからな。中に入って風呂を浴び、何か食べたらいい。それから今回は許すが、二度と酒に手を出しちゃいかんぞ』
"`There, that'll do, lad. I believe 'ee, and forgive thee. Don't matter much to I now if I have lost a hundred pound. 'Tis only my luck, and if 'tweren't lost there, 'twould just as like be lost somewhere else. Go in and wash thyself, and get summat to eat; and if I forgive 'ee this time, don't 'ee ever touch the drink again.'
『旦那様』とわたしは言いました。『ありがとうございます。ちっとでも金が入りましたら、返せるものはお返します。酒は神様に誓ってもう飲みません』
"`Master,' I says, `I thank 'ee, and if I ever get a bit o' money I'll pay thee back what I can; and there's my sacred word I'll never touch the drink again.'
わたしが旦那さんに手を差し出したら、旦那さんは握り返しくれました。泥だらけだったんですがね。
"I held him out my hand, and he took it, for all 'twas so dirty.
『気にするな、おまえ。明日は警察にやつらを追いかけもらおう』
"`That's right, lad; and to-morrow we'll put the p'leece on to trace them fellows down.'
わたしは約束を守りましたよ、ミスタ――ミスタ――ミスタ――」
"I kep' my promise, Mr--Mr--Mr--"
「ウエストレイ」と建築家は教えた。
"Westray," the architect suggested.
「お名前を伺っなかったんですよ。ほら、主任司祭はわたしを紹介くれませんでしたからね。わたしは約束を守りました、ミスタ・ウエストレイ。それからはずっと禁酒てるんで。でも旦那さんは警察にやつらの跡を追わせることはなかったんです。というのは次の日の朝早くに卒中を起こして、二週間後にゃお亡くなりなっしまったんです。ウィドコウムには緑の柵をめぐらしたお父さんとお祖父さんの墓があるんですが、その近くに埋めてさし上げましたよ。黄色いズボンと青いチョッキは羊飼いのティモシー・フォードに形見分けしてやったんですが、あいつはそのあと何年も日曜日になるとそれをとりました。わたしは旦那さんが埋葬れた日に農場を離れてカランにました。片手間仕事をやっとったんですが、寺男が病気になってからは墓堀の手伝いをとりました。で、彼が死んだときに代わりの寺男にれたんで。つぎの精霊降臨祭(註 復活祭後の第七日曜日)であれから四十年になりますわい」
"I didn't know your name, you see, because Rector never introduced _me_ yesterday. I kep' my promise, Mr Westray, and bin teetotal ever since; but he never put the p'leece on the track, for he was took with a stroke next morning early, and died a fortnight later. They laid him up to Wydcombe nigh his father and his grandfather, what have green rails round their graves; and give his yellow breeches and blue waistcoat to Timothy Foord the shepherd, and he wore them o' Sundays for many a year after that. I left farming the same day as old master was put underground, and come into Cullerne, and took odd jobs till the sexton fell sick, and then I helped dig graves; and when he died they made I sexton, and that were forty years ago come Whitsun."
「マーチン・ジョウリフはお父さんが死んだあと、農場の経営を引き継いだのですか?」ウエストレイはしばらく沈黙がつづいたあと尋ねた。
"Did Martin Joliffe keep on the farm after his father's death?" Westray asked, after an interval of silence.
彼らは話をながら信者席の列のあいだをぶらぶら歩き、大聖堂を二つに区切る石の障壁を通り抜けた。カラン大聖堂の聖歌隊席は他の部分よりも床が数フィート高くなっおり、身廊に降りる階段の上に立つと左右に交差廊が広々とひろがっいるのが見えた。北袖廊の端の壁――かつてその外にチャプターハウスと修道院の宿坊が建った――には高いところに小さなランセット窓が三つあるだけだった。しかし交差部分の南端には壁がまったくなくて、二つの欄間窓と無限に入り組んだ狭間飾りを持つヴィニコウム修道院長の窓がその全面を占めた。その結果、奇妙な対照が生み出された。教会の他の部分は、窓が小さいために寂しいくらい光りが抑えられており、北袖廊は建物の中でもっとも薄暗い部分となっいるのだが、南袖廊、つまりブランダマー側廊は常に澄みきった陽の光を浴びたのである。さらに、身廊はノルマン様式で、袖廊と聖歌隊席は初期イギリス様式であるのに、この窓は複雑な構成と、ごてごてと手のこんだ細部を持つ後期垂直様式なのだ。その相違はあまりにも顕著で、建築をまったく知らない素人も思わず注意をむけるくらいだった。まして専門家の目ともなれば、なおさらひきつけられて当然だろう。ウエストレイは一瞬、質問を繰り返しながら階段の上に立ち止まった。
They had wandered along the length of the stalls as they talked, and were passing through the stone screen which divides the minster into two parts. The floor of the choir at Cullerne is higher by some feet than that of the rest of the church, and when they stood on the steps which led down into the nave, the great length of the transepts opened before them on either side. The end of the north transept, on the outside of which once stood the chapter-house and dormitories of the monastery, has only three small lancet-windows high up in the wall, but at the south end of the cross-piece there is no wall at all, for the whole space is occupied by Abbot Vinnicomb's window, with its double transoms and infinite subdivisions of tracery. Thus is produced a curious contrast, for, while the light in the rest of the church is subdued to sadness by the smallness of the windows, and while the north transept is the most sombre part of all the building, the south transept, or Blandamer aisle, is constantly in clear daylight. Moreover, while the nave is of the Norman style, and the transepts and choir of the Early English, this window is of the latest Perpendicular, complicated in its scheme, and meretricious in the elaboration of its detail. The difference is so great as to force itself upon the attention even of those entirely unacquainted with architecture, and it has naturally more significance for the professional eye. Westray stood a moment on the steps as he repeated his question:
「マーチンは農場の経営を引き継いだのですか」
"Did Martin keep on the farm?"
「ああ、引き継ぎましたが、真剣にやらかったんですな。もっぱらフェミー嬢ちゃんが仕事をなさりました。マーチンの邪魔がなければお父さんよりいい農場主になっとったでしょう。ところがマーチンは彼女が半ペニー稼いぐあいだに一ペニー使っちまい、とうとう何もかも競売に付されちまいました。オックスフォードでうぬぼれて、誰もいさめる人がなかったんです。紳士にならにゃならねえとさんざん気取りまくって、しまいに『紳士ジョウリフ』とか、もっとあとになっておつむがいかれてた頃は『雲形じいさん』とか呼ばとりました。頭が変になったのはあれのせいですよ」そう言って寺男は巨大な窓を指さした。「あの銀色と緑のしわざでさあ」
"Ay, he kep' it on, but he never had his heart in it. Miss Phemie did the work, and would have been a better farmer than her father, if Martin had let her be; but he spent a penny for every ha'penny she made, till all came to the hammer. Oxford puffed him up, and there was no one to check him; so he must needs be a gentleman, and give himself all kinds of airs, till people called him `Gentleman Joliffe,' and later on `Old Neb'ly' when his mind was weaker. 'Twas that turned his brain," said the sexton, pointing to the great window; "'twas the silver and green what done it."
ウエストレイが見上げると、窓の中央の仕切り上部に雲形紋章が見えた。まわりをそれよりも濃いガラスに囲まれ、日中の光りの中で見るその輝きは、昨晩、夕闇の中でたときよりも、いちだんと強い印象を与えた。
Westray looked up, and in the head of the centre light saw the nebuly coat shining among the darker painted glass with a luminosity which was even more striking in daylight than in the dusk of the previous evening.
第五章 ~~~
CHAPTER FIVE.
ためしに一週間住んたところウエストレはミス・ジョウリフの下宿の住み心地のよさに満足た。「神の手」は確かに聖堂からやや離れいるが、町ではいちばんの高台にあり、建築家は食事にこだわるだけでなく、空気がさわやかで、低地でないことを極端に重視たのだ。家中どこも念入りに掃除れていることもよかったし、ミス・ジョウリフの料理も気に入った。凝ったものを作るのでないかぎり、彼女の料理は長い経験によってある意味で完璧という域に達した。
After a week's trial, Westray made up his mind that Miss Joliffe's lodgings would suit him. It was true that the Hand of God was somewhat distant from the church, but, then, it stood higher than the rest of the town, and the architect's fads were not confined to matters of eating and drinking, but attached exaggerated importance to bracing air and the avoidance of low-lying situations. He was pleased also by the scrupulous cleanliness pervading the place, and by Miss Joliffe's cooking, which a long experience had brought to some perfection, so far as plain dishes were concerned.
召使いがおらず、ミス・ジョウリフは自分が下宿にいるときは、姪に給仕をないことも分かった。このため彼はやや不自由を強いられることになった。もともと性格的に思いやり深い彼は、もう若いとはいえない女主人に無理をないよう気を遣ったからである。呼び鈴は鳴らさないように鳴らしたときはしばしば踊り場までて、螺旋階段の下のほうにむかって大声で用件を告げ、真暗な石の階段をわざわざ登ってなくてもいいようにた。このような気遣いはミス・ジョウリフにも伝わり、彼女が彼にこのまま下宿つづけて欲しいと切に願っいる様子をありありと示すと、ウエストレイは虚栄心をくすぐられた。
He found that no servant was kept, and that Miss Joliffe never allowed her niece to wait at table, so long as she herself was in the house. This occasioned him some little inconvenience, for his naturally considerate disposition made him careful of overtaxing a landlady no longer young. He rang his bell with reluctance, and when he did so, often went out on to the landing and shouted directions down the well-staircase, in the hopes of sparing any unnecessary climbing of the great nights of stone steps. This consideration was not lost upon Miss Joliffe, and Westray was flattered by an evident anxiety which she displayed to retain him as a lodger.
自分の好意が充分に感謝れているて、彼はある夕方、お茶の時間近くに、女主人を呼んでベルヴュー・ロッジに住みつづける旨を伝えることにた。これからも部屋を借りることをはっきり目に見える形で示すため、彼は自分の趣味に合わない置物や、とりわけ食器棚の上にかかる大きな花の絵をはずすよう要求することに決めた。
It was, then, with a proper appreciation of the favour which he was conferring, that he summoned her one evening near teatime, to communicate to her his intention of remaining at Bellevue Lodge. As an outward and visible sign of more permanent tenure, he decided to ask for the removal of some of those articles which did not meet his taste, and especially of the great flower-picture that hung over the sideboard.
ミス・ジョウリフは書斎と彼女が呼んいる部屋に座った。これは家の裏手にある小さな部屋で(かつては宿の食品室だった)、彼女はいかなる家計の問題に取り組まなければならないときも、ここに引きこもるのだった。家計の問題はもう何年にもわたって嫌になるほど頻繁に起きたが、今や兄の長期にわたる病いと死が、この二と二を足して五になければならない難儀な戦いに危機的な状況をもたらした。彼女は病気という口実のもとに求められるものはどんな贅沢も惜しみなく兄に与え、マーチンもそれをいちいち気にするようなこまかい男ではなかった。寝室の暖房、牛肉スープ、シャンペン、金持ちにとってはどうということのないものながら、貧乏人の献身的な愛にとっては重い負担となっのしかかる千と一つのことどもが、すべて借金として勘定書に記録れてた。こうした出費が家計のなかで突出することは、ミス・ジョウリフにとって、倹約の規則をあまりにも大きく逸脱することであり、贅沢の罪――七つの大罪の先陣をつとめるルクスリア、つまり奢侈の罪――から良心の目をそらすには、事態の緊急性という言い訳がどうしても必要になった。(註 ルクスリアは色欲の罪。作者の勘違いと思われる)
Miss Joliffe was sitting in what she called her study. It was a little apartment at the back of the house (once the still-room of the old inn), to which she retreated when any financial problem had to be grappled. Such problems had presented themselves with unpleasant frequency for many years past, and now her brother's long illness and death brought about something like a crisis in the weary struggle to make two and two into five. She had spared him no luxury that illness is supposed to justify, nor was Martin himself a man to be over-scrupulous in such matters. Bedroom fires, beef-tea, champagne, the thousand and one little matters which scarcely come within the cognisance of the rich, but tax so heavily the devotion of the poor, had all left their mark on the score. That such items should figure in her domestic accounts, seemed to Miss Joliffe so great a violation of the rules which govern prudent housekeeping, that all the urgency of the situation was needed to free her conscience from the guilt of extravagance--from that _luxuria_ or wantonness, which leads the van among the seven deadly sins.
肉屋のフィルポッツはミス・ジョウリフ用の帳簿にスイートブレッド(註 子羊の膵臓)という記載があるのをて半ば笑みをもらし、半ばため息をついた。実をいえば、彼はこれに類する幾つもの購入品をわざと記録につけ忘れた。優しい思いやりからこっそりそうしたのだが、にもかかわらず好意の受け手はそのことに気がついて、まさにそのさりげなさのゆえにこうした人助けはいっそうありがたく感じられるものだ。雑貨屋のカスタンスも痩せ衰えた老婦人にシャンペンを注文れたときは、びくびくながら応じた。ワインのような高級品に対して請求なければならない料金を少しでも取り返さやろうと、お茶や砂糖の注文があったときは、きっちり料金分の量目を入れたうえ、さらにそれをぐっと押しこみ、入れ物からあふれるくらいサービスやった。しかしどんなに倹約を心がけても全体としての出費はかさみ、ミス・ジョウリフはそのとき、世界中で珍重れているドゥック・ドゥ・ベントヴォリオの金の薄紙を巻き付けた三本の瓶が、頭上の棚から今も首を突き出しいるのを眺めながら、借金の重みをずしりと感じたのである。ドクタ・エニファーに借りいる分のことは考えようともなかったし、恐らくほかの借金より心配する必要がなかっただろう。医者は、金があるなら払っくれるだろうし、まったく払えないというなら全額免除してやろう、と腹を決めて、請求書を送っなかったからである。
Philpotts the butcher had half smiled, half sighed to see sweetbreads entered in Miss Joliffe's book, and had, indeed, forgotten to keep record of many a similar purchase; using that kindly, quiet charity which the recipient is none the less aware of, and values the more from its very unostentation. So, too, did Custance the grocer tremble in executing champagne orders for the thin and wayworn old lady, and gave her full measure pressed down and running over in teas and sugars, to make up for the price which he was compelled to charge for such refinements in the way of wine. Yet the total had mounted up in spite of all forbearance, and Miss Joliffe was at this moment reminded of its gravity by the gold-foil necks of three bottles of the universally-appreciated Duc de Bentivoglio brand, which still projected from a shelf above her head. Of Dr Ennefer's account she scarcely dared even to think; and there was perhaps less need of her doing so, for he never sent it in, knowing very well that she would pay it as she could, and being quite prepared to remit it entirely if she could never pay it at all.
彼女は医者の配慮に感謝、彼がいつも犯す、とりわけいまいましい不作法を、まれに見る寛容の心で見逃した。この不作法というのは薬を送る宛先を、そこがいまでも宿屋であるかのように書き記すことだった。ミス・ジョウリフは「神の手」に引っ越す前に、修繕費用として支給れたなけなしの金のほとんどを、正面に書かれた宿屋の名前を塗り消すことに費やした。ところが大雨のあとは、あの大きな黒い文字が天の邪鬼にも皮膜を透かしてじろりとこちらを、オルガン奏者は「神の手」の裏をかくのは容易じゃないな、などと軽口をたたいた。ミス・ジョウリフはそんな冗談をくだらないし、無礼だと言い、ドアの上の明かり取り窓に「ベルヴュー・ハウス」と金文字を入れることにたのだった。ところがカランのペンキ屋は「ベルヴュー」を小さく書きすぎ、残りの空間を埋めるために「ハウス」をあまりにも大きく書いたものだから、オルガン奏者はこの不釣り合いをまたしても皮肉を言った。ここが「ハウス」であるのは誰でも知っいるが、「ベルヴュー」であることは誰も知らないのだから、あれは逆に書くべきだ、と。
She appreciated his consideration, and overlooked with rare tolerance a peculiarly irritating breach of propriety of which he was constantly guilty. This was nothing less than addressing medicines to her house as if it were still an inn. Before Miss Joliffe moved into the Hand of God, she had spent much of the little allowed her for repairs, in covering up the name of the inn painted on the front. But after heavy rains the great black letters stared perversely through their veil, and the organist made small jokes about it being a difficult thing to thwart the Hand of God. Silly and indecorous, Miss Joliffe termed such witticisms, and had Bellevue House painted in gold upon the fanlight over the door. But the Cullerne painter wrote Bellevue too small, and had to fill up the space by writing House too large; and the organist sneered again at the disproportion, saying it should have been the other way, for everyone knew it was a house, but none knew it was Bellevue.
その後、ドクタ・エニファーが「手 ミスタ・ジョウリフ」という宛名で薬を送った――「神の手」ですらなく、ただ「手」と書いて。ミス・ジョウリフは陰鬱な広間のテーブルに置かれた薬瓶をさげすむように、怒りの声が口からもれぬよう息を殺しながら、手早く包みを引き破いた。このように心優しい医者は、日頃の仕事の忙しさに取り紛れ知ら知らずのうちに心優しい婦人をいらだたたのである。そのあげく彼女は書斎に引きこもり、人も汝の頬をうたば、もう一方の頬をもむけよ、という教えを読んで、ようやく心の平静を取り戻すことができたのだった。
And then Dr Ennefer addressed his medicine to "Mr Joliffe, The Hand"-- not even to The Hand of God, but simply The Hand; and Miss Joliffe eyed the bottles askance as they lay on the table in the dreary hall, and tore the wrappers off them quickly, holding her breath the while that no exclamation of impatience might escape her. Thus, the kindly doctor, in the hurry of his workaday life, vexed, without knowing it, the heart of the kindly lady, till she was constrained to retire to her study, and read the precepts about turning the other cheek to the smiters, before she could quite recover her serenity.
ミス・ジョウリフは書斎に座ってマーチンの借金をどう返済しようと考えた。彼の兄はその無秩序で非能率的な人生を通して、おのれの秩序だった能率的な習慣を誇りにた。それは几帳面で組織的な請求書のまとめ方にあらわれいるすぎなかったが、しかしその点だけは確かに秀でたといえる。彼は借金の支払いをたことがなかった。支払いをしようと思ったことすらなかっただろう。ただ手袋を入れる古い箱の蓋を物差しがわりに使って、請求書を一枚一枚同じ幅に折り、実にこぎれいな字で日付、貸し主の名前、借りた額を記し、それをまとめてゴムバンドで丸くとめたのである。ミス・ジョウリフは彼の死後、引き出しの中にそんなため息をつきたくなるような束がごっそり溜めこまれているのを知った。彼にはいろいろな商人をひいきに、広くあまねく借金の木を植え、しだいにそれをウパス(註 毒がとれる木)の森へと育て上げる才能があった。
Miss Joliffe sat in her study considering how Martin's accounts were to be met. Her brother, throughout his disorderly and unbusinesslike life, had prided himself on orderly and business habits. It was true that these were only manifested in the neat and methodical arrangement of his bills, but there he certainly excelled. He never paid a bill; it was believed it never occurred to him to pay one; but he folded each account to exactly the same breadth, using the cover of an old glove-box as a gauge, wrote very neatly on the outside the date, the name of the creditor, and the amount of the debt, and with an indiarubber band enrolled it in a company of its fellows. Miss Joliffe found drawers full of such disheartening packets after his death, for Martin had a talent for distributing his favours, and of planting small debts far and wide, which by-and-by grew up into a very upas forest.
ミス・ジョウリフの困難は数日前に届いたある手紙によって一千倍にもいや増された。この手紙は良心にかかわる問題を引き起こした。その書面が目の前の小さなテーブルの上に開かれてた。 ~~~
Miss Joliffe's difficulties were increased a thousandfold by a letter which had reached her some days before, and which raised a case of conscience. It lay open on the little table before her:
ニュー・ボンド・ストリート百三十九番地
"139, New Bond Street.
~~~ 奥様
"Madam,
~~~ このほどわが社は静物画数点の購入を委託れ、つきましては、貴殿がお持ちのはずの花の大作を引き取らいただけないかと、お伺い申し上げるしだいです。お尋ねいただいいる作品は故マーチン・ジョウリフ殿《エスクワイア》が以前ご所蔵になったもので、マホガニーのテーブルの上に花かごがあり、左手に毛虫が描かれてます。わが社は依頼主の鑑識眼に信頼を置いおり、作品がすぐれたものであることを固く信じおりますので、事前の鑑定抜きで五十ポンドをお支払いするつもりです。
"We are entrusted with a commission to purchase several pictures of still-life, and believe that you have a large painting of flowers for the acquiring of which we should be glad to treat. The picture to which we refer was formerly in the possession of the late Michael Joliffe, Esquire, and consists of a basket of flowers on a mahogany table, with a caterpillar in the left-hand corner. We are so sure of our client's taste and of the excellence of the painting that we are prepared to offer for it a sum of fifty pounds, and to dispense with any previous inspection. ~~~ "We shall be glad to receive a reply at your early convenience, and in the meantime
ご都合が付きしだい、お返事をいただければ幸甚です。
"We remain, madam,
~~~ あなたの従順なるしもべ
"Your most obedient servants,
ボーントン・アンド・ラターワース商会 ~~~
"Baunton and Lutterworth."
ミス・ジョウリフがこの手紙を読むのはこれが百回目だった。彼女は「故マーチン・ジョウリフ殿《エスクワイア》が以前ご所蔵になった」という部分をつきることのない喜びとともに繰り返し読んだ。その言い回しには祖先の威厳と貫禄を感じさせる何かがあり、彼女の気持ちを浮き立た、周囲に対するみじめな苦々しい思いを和らげた。「故マーチン・ジョウリフ殿《エスクワイア》」――まるで銀行家の遺言みたい。彼女は再びユーフィミア・ジョウリフになった。夏の日曜日の朝、ウィドコウム大聖堂に座っいる夢見がちな少女、小枝模様の新しいモスリン服を自慢、まわりの壁にいくつも飾られたジョウリフ家の先祖の銘板を誇らしく思う少女に。サウスエイヴォンシャの中産農民《ヨーマン》には公爵と同じように家系というものがあるのだ。
Miss Joliffe read this letter for the hundredth time, and dwelt with unabated complacency on the "formerly in the possession of the late Michael Joliffe, Esquire." There was about the phrase something of ancestral dignity and importance that gratified her, and dulled the sordid bitterness of her surroundings. "The late Michael Joliffe, Esquire"--it read like a banker's will; and she was once more Euphemia Joliffe, a romantic girl sitting in Wydcombe church of a summer Sunday morning, proud of a new sprigged muslin, and proud of many tablets to older Joliffes on the walls about her; for yeomen in Southavonshire have pedigrees as well as Dukes.
はじめのうちこの手紙は苦境を脱するための天佑のように思われたが、あとになると良心のとがめがその脱出路をふさぐようにたちあらわれた。「花の大作」――それは彼女の父の自慢だった――恥さらしな妻の作品だったが、自慢のタネだったのだ。彼女がまだ幼い頃、父はよく彼女を両腕に抱きかかえ輝くテーブルの上板を見せたり、毛虫に手を触れさせたりたものだ。妻が与えた傷はきっとまだうずいただろう。なにしろソフィアが彼と子供たちを捨ててからたった一年しか過ぎなかったのだから。それにもかかわらず彼は妻の才能を自慢、彼女が戻っくるという希望を捨ててはなかったらしい。死んだとき彼は、中年という暗い峡谷の半ばにあったユーフィミアに古い書き物机を残した。その中にはささやかな母の形見がぎっしり詰まった――結婚式に着用た手袋、派手なブローチ、けばけばしいイヤリング、その他多くの取る足りない小物であったけれど、父はそれらを大切に保存たのだ。その他にもソフィアの細長い木製の絵の具箱と、絵の具を混ぜ合わすための色付き顔料の小瓶と、そしてこの「マホガニーのテーブルの上に花かごがあり、左手に毛虫が描かれて」いる絵を彼女に残した。
At first sight it seemed as if Providence had offered her in this letter a special solution of her difficulties, but afterwards scruples had arisen that barred the way of escape. "A large painting of flowers"-- her father had been proud of it--proud of his worthless wife's work; and when she herself was a little child, had often held her up in his arms to see the shining table-top and touch the caterpillar. The wound his wife had given him must still have been raw, for that was only a year after Sophia had left him and the children; yet he was proud of her cleverness, and perhaps not without hope of her coming back. And when he died he left to poor Euphemia, then half-way through the dark gorge of middle age, an old writing-desk full of little tokens of her mother-- the pair of gloves she wore at her wedding, a flashy brooch, a pair of flashy earrings, and many other unconsidered trifles that he had cherished. He left her, too, Sophia's long wood paint-box, with its little bottles of coloured powders for mixing oil-paints, and this same "basket of flowers on a mahogany table, with a caterpillar in the left-hand corner."
この絵の価値についてはいつも言われていることがあった。父は子供たちに妻の話をほとんどず、ミス・ユーフィミアは大人になるまでのあいだに、いろいろなほのめかしやごまかし半分の話を切れ切れに聞き、ようやく母の恥について知るようになったのだった。しかしマイケル・ジョウリフはこの絵を妻の傑作とみなしたと言われ、年老いたミセス・ジャナウエイによると、ソフィアはこの絵には百ポンドの値打ちがあると何度も言ったそうだ。ミス・ユーフィミア自身もその価値に少しも疑問をさしはさんだことはなかったので、今度の手紙にあるような申し出は彼女にとってなんら驚きではなかった。実のところ、提示れた金額は市場価値よりずっと低いと思われたくらいなのである。しかし絵を売ることはどうしてもできなかった。それは神聖な委託物であり、(Jの字を彫りこまれた銀のスプーンをのぞいて)むさ苦しい現在を裕福な過去につなぐ最後の輪だった。それは家の宝であって、手放す気にはとうていなれなかった。
There had always been a tradition as to the value of this picture. Her father had spoken little of his wife to the children, and it was only piecemeal, as she grew into womanhood, that Miss Euphemia learnt from hints and half-told truths the story of her mother's shame. But Michael Joliffe was known to have considered this painting his wife's masterpiece, and old Mrs Janaway reported that Sophia had told her many a time it would fetch a hundred pounds. Miss Euphemia herself never had any doubt as to its worth, and so the offer in this letter occasioned her no surprise. She thought, in fact, that the sum named was considerably less than its market value, but sell it she could not. It was a sacred trust, and the last link (except the silver spoons marked "J.") that bound the squalid present to the comfortable past. It was an heirloom, and she could never bring herself to part with it.
そのとき呼び鈴が鳴り、彼女は手紙をポケットに滑りこま、ドレスの前のしわを伸ばすと、ミスタ・ウエストレイの用を聞きに石の階段を登った。建築家はカラン滞在中はここに下宿つづけたいと彼女に告げ、その知らせがミス・ジョウリフに大きな喜びを与えたのをて、自分の寛大さに満足た。彼女は大いに安堵て、羊歯やらマットやら貝殻サルビアやら蝋細工の果物を取り除き、彼の望み通り調度品にさまざまな小さな変更を加えることに快く同意た。建築家であるにもかかわらず、ミスタ・ウエストレイはひどく趣味が悪いように思われたが、その優しい態度や彼女の下宿に残りたいという気持ちに免じて可能なかぎりの寛容を彼に示した。それから建築家は花の絵の取りはずしに話を持っいった。彼は遠回しに、絵がこの部屋には大きすぎるのではないか、とか、絶えずカラン大聖堂の見取り図を参照なければならないので、それを貼る場所があるとうれしい、とか言った。ちょうど沈む太陽の光がまともに絵に当たって、下品なけばけばしさを照らし出し、何とてもこの絵を取りはずそうという彼の決意をさらに固いものにた。しかしミス・ジョウリフの顔に広がる動揺の色は攻めかからんとする勇気をいささか萎えさせた。
Then the bell rang, and she slipped the letter into her pocket, smoothed the front of her dress, and climbed the stone stairs to see what Mr Westray wanted. The architect told her that he hoped to remain as her lodger during his stay in Cullerne, and he was pleased at his own magnanimity when he saw what pleasure the announcement gave Miss Joliffe. She felt it as a great relief, and consented readily enough to take away the ferns, and the mats, and the shell flowers, and the wax fruit, and to make sundry small alterations of the furniture which he desired. It seemed to her, indeed, that, considering he was an architect, Mr Westray's taste was strangely at fault; but she extended to him all possible forbearance, in view of his kindly manner and of his intention to remain with her. Then the architect approached the removal of the flower-painting. He hinted delicately that it was perhaps rather too large for the room, and that he should be glad of the space to hang a plan of Cullerne Church, to which he would have constantly to refer. The rays of the setting sun fell full on the picture at the time, and, lighting up its vulgar showiness, strengthened him in his resolution to be free of it at any cost. But the courage of his attack flagged a little, as he saw the look of dismay which overspread Miss Joliffe's face.
「ほら、この部屋にはちょっと派手すぎて気が散るんですよ。ここは作業場として使うことになるんですからね」
"I think, you know, it is a little too bright and distracting for this room, which will really be my workshop."
ミス・ジョウリフは、この下宿人には審美眼がまったく欠けいるのだと確信、次のように答えるとき、驚きと悲しみを隠しきることができなかった。
Miss Joliffe was now convinced that her lodger was devoid of all appreciation, and she could not altogether conceal her surprise and sadness in replying:
おっしゃる通りにて、便宜をお図りたいのはやまやまですわ。家柄のよい方に下宿て欲しいといつも思っいるんですもの。紳士じゃない方にお貸して評判を落とすような真似はできません。でもこの絵をはずせ、なんておっしゃらないでください。この家にてからずっとここにかかったのです。わたしの兄、亡くなったマーチン・ジョウリフは」――無意識のうちにポケットの手紙に影響れてた彼女は、あやうくマーチン・ジョウリフ殿《エスクワイア》と言うところだった――「とても価値のあるものと考えて、死ぬ前、病気に冒されながらも、何時間もここに座ってこれを見つめたものです。絵をはずせなんておっしゃらないでください。もしかたらお分かりじゃないかも知れませんが、わたしの母が描いた絵というだけじゃなくて、絵としてても、とても価値のある芸術作品なんですのよ」
"I am sure I want to oblige you in every way, sir, and to make you comfortable, for I always hope to have gentlefolk for my lodgers, and could never bring myself to letting the rooms down by taking anyone who was not a gentleman; but I hope you will not ask me to move the picture. It has hung here ever since I took the house, and my brother, `the late Martin Joliffe'"--she was unconsciously influenced by the letter which she had in her pocket, and almost said "the late Martin Joliffe, Esquire"--"thought very highly of it, and used to sit here for hours in his last illness studying it. I hope you will not ask me to move the picture. You may not be aware, perhaps, that, besides being painted by my mother, it is in itself a very valuable work of art."
そのことばには、ごく微かではあれ、下宿人の趣味の悪さをくだし、その無知を啓発してやろうという調子があり、ウエストレイをいらいらた。彼は小馬鹿にたような口調で言い返した。
There was a suggestion, however faint, in her words, of condescension for her lodger's bad taste, and a desire to enlighten his ignorance which nettled Westray; and he contrived in his turn to throw a tone of superciliousness into his reply.
「ああ、もちろん感傷的な理由からそのままにおきたいというのなら、それ以上は何も言いませんよ。それにわたしがあなたのお母さんの作品を批判するなんてとんでもない話です。しかしですね――」そこまでしゃべって彼は口を閉ざした。老婦人のひどく傷ついた様子をて、些細なことに腹を立てたことを後悔たのである。
"Oh, of course, if you wish it to remain from sentimental reasons, I have nothing more to say, and I must not criticise your mother's work; but--" And he broke off, seeing that the old lady took the matter so much to heart, and being sorry that he had been ruffled at a trifle.
ミス・ジョウリフは悔しさを呑みこんだ。絵の価値が正しく評価れてないと思ったことは一再ならあったけれど、面とむかっけなされたのははじめてだった。しかし彼女は絵の価値を保証するものをポケットに持ったので心を広く持つことができた。
Miss Joliffe gulped down her chagrin. It was the first time she had heard the picture openly disparaged, though she had thought that on more than one occasion it had not been appreciated so much as it deserved. But she carried a guarantee of its value in her pocket, and could afford to be magnanimous.
「この絵はたいへんな値打ちものだと、今までずっと評価を受けたんです」と彼女はつづけた。「といってもわたし自身、その美しさのすべてが分かるわけではありません。充分絵の勉強をませんでしたからね。でも手放す気にさえなれば、高値で引き取ってもらえることは絶対間違いありません」
"It has always been considered very valuable," she went on, "though I daresay I do not myself understand all its beauties, because I have not been sufficiently trained in art. But I am quite sure that it could be sold for a great deal of money, if I could only bring myself to part with it."
ウエストレイは暗に美術に関して無知だと言われてかちんとた。また片意地としか思えない売値の誇張のせいで、絵に対する女主人の、家族的な愛着に同情する気持ちがだいぶそがれてしまった。
Westray was irritated by the hint that he knew little of art, and his sympathy for his landlady in her family attachment to the picture was much discounted by what he knew must be wilful exaggeration as to its selling value.
ミス・ジョウリフは彼の心のうちを読み、ポケットから一片の紙切れを取り出した。
Miss Joliffe read his thoughts, and took a piece of paper from her pocket.
「これはこの絵に五十ポンドを支払うという、ロンドンのとある紳士からの申し入れです。どうぞ読んください間違っいるのがわたしでないことが分かるでしょうから」
"I have here," she said, "an offer of fifty pounds for the picture from some gentlemen in London. Please read it, that you may see it is not I who am mistaken."
彼女は業者からの手紙を差し出し、ウエストレイは彼女に調子を合わせるようにそれを受け取った。彼は手紙を注意深く読み読み進むにつれますますいぶかしく思った。いったいどういうことなのだろう。この申し出は別の絵に対するものだろうか。なにしろボーントン・アンド・ラターワースといえばロンドンの美術商でも有数の業者である。レターヘッドつきの便箋紙や、手紙の全体的な様式からて、偽物であるとは考えられない。彼は問題の絵に視線を投げかけた。陽の光がまだ当たって、今まで以上に醜悪に見えた。が、再びミス・ジョウリフに話しかけたとき、彼の口調は変化た。
She held him out the dealers' letter, and Westray took it to humour her. He read it carefully, and wondered more and more as he went on. What could be the explanation? Could the offer refer to some other picture? for he knew Baunton and Lutterworth as being most reputable among London picture-dealers; and the idea of the letter being a hoax was precluded by the headed paper and general style of the communication. He glanced at the picture. The sunlight was still on it, and it stood out more hideous than ever; but his tone was altered as he spoke again to Miss Joliffe.
「この絵のことを言っいるんだと思いますか。他に絵はないんでしょうか」
"Do you think," he said, "that this is the picture mentioned? Have you no other pictures?"
「ええ、こんなのは他にありません。間違いなくこの絵のことですわ。だって隅に毛虫が描いあるって書いありますでしょう」そして彼女はテーブルの上をはうぶくぶくた緑色の虫を指さした。
"No, nothing of this sort. It is certainly this one; you see, they speak of the caterpillar in the corner." And she pointed to the bulbous green animal that wriggled on the table-top.
「そうですね。でもどうやって彼らはこの絵のことを知ったのだろう」彼は新たな問題の出現に絵を取りはずすことなどすっかり忘れしまった。
"So they do," he said; "but how did they know anything about it?"--quite forgetting the question of its removal in the new problem that was presented.
「たぶん本当にいい作品は業者もよく知っいるんじゃないでしょうか。問い合わせがあったのはこれがはじめてじゃないんです。わたしの兄が亡くなった当日にも紳士の方があの絵のことでこちらにいらっしゃったんです。家にたのは兄だけで、わたしはその方をてはないんですが、きっとあれをお買いになりたかったんでしょうね。でも兄は売ろうとなかったのです」
"Oh, I fancy that most really good paintings are well-known to dealers. This is not the first inquiry we have had, for the very day of my dear brother's death a gentleman called here about it. None of us were at home except my brother, so I did not see him; but I believe he wanted to buy it, only my dear brother would never have consented to its being sold."
「これは悪くない取引だと思いますよ」ウエストレイは言った。「断るなら、よく考えてからにするべきですね」
"It seems to me a handsome offer," Westray said; "I should think very seriously before I refused it."
「ええ、事情が事情ですからよく考えなければいけませんわ」ミス・ジョウリフは答えた。「わたしはお金持ちではありませんから。でもどうしてもこの絵は売りたくはないのです。だって小さいときからずっとこの絵と一緒でしたし、父がそれは大切にましたからね。ミスタ・ウエストレイ、はずししまおうなんてお考えにならないでください。もうしばらくこのままにたら、あなたもきっと好きになる思いますわ」
"Yes, it is very serious to me in my position," answered Miss Joliffe; "for I am not rich; but I could not sell this picture. You see, I have known it ever since I was a little girl, and my father set such store by it. I hope, Mr Westray, you will not want it moved. I think, if you let it stop a little, you will get to like it very much yourself."
ウエストレイはそれ以上議論をなかった。絵をはずすことが女主人にとってつらいことであることが分かったし、必要なら間に合わの手段として、絵の上に見取り図をはることもできる考えたのである。こうして協定は成立、ミス・ジョウリフはボーントン・アンド・ラターワースの手紙をポケットに戻し、少なくとも幾分かは心の落ち着きを回復て、再び請求書のもとへと帰っいった。
Westray did not press the matter further; he saw it was a sore point with his landlady, and reflected that he might hang a plan in front of the painting, if need be, as a temporary measure. So a concordat was established, and Miss Joliffe put Baunton and Lutterworth's letter back into her pocket, and returned to her accounts with equanimity at least partially restored.
彼女が部屋を行ってから、ウエストレイはもう一度絵を子細に眺め、今までにもましてその価値のなさを確信た。色づかが粗く、輪郭が強調すぎた最悪の素人画で、与えられた空間を塗りつぶす以外、何の目的もないような印象を与えた。その印象は金箔をかぶせた額縁がことさら凝った、巧みな作りであるという事実によって強められた。ソフィアは何かの折りにこの額縁を手に入れたのだろう、そして内側を埋めるためにこの絵を描いたのだ、彼はそう結論た。
After she had left the room, Westray examined the picture once more, and more than ever was he convinced of its worthlessness. It had all the crude colouring and hard outlines of the worst amateur work, and gave the impression of being painted with no other object than to cover a given space. This view was, moreover, supported by the fact that the gilt frame was exceptionally elaborate and well made, and he came to the conclusion that Sophia must somehow have come into possession of the frame, and had painted the flower-piece to fill it.
窓を開け、屋根屋根のむこうに広がる海を望むと、太陽は赤い玉となって水平線に浮かんた。夕暮れはしんと静まりかえり、町は深い休息のなかに浸った。青い煙が町の上を長く水平にたなびき、草を燃やす匂いがかすかに空中をただよった。中央棟の鐘釣り場は夕陽に照らされて淡紅色に輝き、ねぐらに帰る前のコクマル烏が大群となってけたたましくさえずりながら、金色の風見鶏のまわりを旋回た。
The sun was a red ball on the horizon as he flung up the window and looked out over the roofs towards the sea. The evening was very still, and the town lay steeped in deep repose. The smoke hung blue above it in long, level strata, and there was perceptible in the air a faint smell of burning weeds. The belfry story of the centre tower glowed with a pink flush in the sunset, and a cloud of jackdaws wheeled round the golden vanes, chattering and fluttering before they went to bed.
「目を奪われるような眺めじゃないかね」肘のところで声がた。「秋の空気には不思議なかぐわしさがあって、はっとられる」オルガン奏者がいつの間にか部屋に入った。「わたしはつき見放されたような気分だよ。今晩はわたしの部屋で食事ながら話をしよう」
"It is a striking scene, is it not?" said a voice at his elbow; "there is a curious aromatic scent in this autumn air that makes one catch one's breath." It was the organist who had slipped in unawares. "I feel down on my luck," he said. "Take your supper in my room to-night, and let us have a talk."
ウエストレイはそれまでの数日間、彼とはあまり会っなかったので喜んで晩を一緒に過ごすことに同意た。ただし場所は変更になって、夕食は建築家の部屋で取ることになった。その晩の二人は多くのことを語り合い、ウエストレイは相手に心ゆくまでカランの住人や風習についておしゃべりをた。人の話を聞く気分になったのと、自分が住むことになった場所にはどんな人がいるのか、できるかぎり詳しく知りたかったためである。
Westray had not seen much of him for the last few days, and agreed gladly enough that they should spend the evening together; only the venue was changed, and supper taken in the architect's room. They talked over many things that night, and Westray let his companion ramble on to his heart's content about Cullerne men and manners; for he was of a receptive mind, and anxious to learn what he could about those among whom he had taken up his abode.
彼はミスタ・シャーノールにミス・ジョウリフとの会話のことや、絵を取りはずしてもらえなかったことを話した。オルガン奏者はボーントン・アンド・ラターワースの手紙のことは何もかも知った。
He told Mr Sharnall of his conversation with Miss Joliffe, and of the unsuccessful attempt to get the picture removed. The organist knew all about Baunton and Lutterworth's letter.
「可哀想にあの人はこの二週間というもの、あれに良心を悩まされているんだよ。悶々と絵のことについて思いわずらい、幾晩も眠れぬ夜を過ごしいる。『売るべきだろうか、売るべきではないのだろうか』『売れ』と貧乏は言う。『売って債権者どもに胸を張っみせやれ』。マーチンの借金も『売れ』と言う。ムク鳥の雛みたいに大きな口を開けて彼女のまわりに群がり、『売って俺たちを満足くれ』と言うのさ。『いけない』と自尊心は言う。『売ってはいけない。家のなかに油絵があることは、立派な社会的地位を示すしるしなのだから』。『いけないわ』と家族への愛着が言い、彼女が子供だった頃の妙に甲高い小さな声が『売らないで。可哀想なお父さんがどんなに絵を愛したか、愛しいマーチンがどんなに大切にたか、覚えないの』と言う。『愛しいマーチン』か――ふん!マーチンは六十年間、彼女にとって疫病神でしかなかった。しかし女は身内のものが死ぬと聖者の列に加えしまうんだよ。きみは信心深いと言われている女が悪人をこっぴどくののしるのを聞いたことがないかい。ところが彼女の夫や兄弟が死ぬと、生前どんなにろくでもない人生を送ったとしても、彼女は非難ないのさ。愛は彼女の刑法典をも無効にする。自分の家族には抜け道が作っあって、愛しいディックや愛しいトムのことはまるでバクスター(註 十七世紀英国ピューリタンの指導者)描くところの聖人より二倍も偉かったかのように語るのさ。いやはや、血は水よりも濃い。家族に地獄の劫罰はくだらないんだ。愛は地獄の火よりも強く、ディックやトムに奇跡を示す。その代わり彼女は釣り合いを保つために、他人に対しては余計に硫黄の火を燃やさなきゃならん。
"The poor thing has made the question a matter of conscience for the last fortnight," he said, "and worried herself into many a sleepless night over that picture. `Shall I sell it, or shall I not?' `Yes,' says poverty--`sell it, and show a brave front to your creditors.' `Yes,' say Martin's debts, clamouring about her with open mouths, like a nest of young starlings, `sell it, and satisfy us.' `No,' says pride, `don't sell it; it is a patent of respectability to have an oil-painting in the house.' `No,' says family affection, and the queer little piping voice of her own childhood--`don't sell it. Don't you remember how fond poor daddy was of it, and how dear Martin treasured it?' `Dear Martin'--psh! Martin never did her anything but evil turns all his threescore years, but women canonise their own folk when they die. Haven't you seen what they call a religious woman damn the whole world for evil-doers? and then her husband or her brother dies, and may have lived as ill a life as any other upon earth, but she don't damn him. Love bids her penal code halt; she makes a way of escape for her own, and speaks of dear Dick and dear Tom for all the world as if they had been double Baxter-saints. No, blood is thicker than water; damnation doesn't hold good for her own. Love is stronger than hell-fire, and works a miracle for Dick and Tom; only _she_ has to make up the balance by giving other folks an extra dose of brimstone.
最後に世俗的な知恵、というか、ミス・ジョウリフが知恵と考えるものがこう言う。『いや、売るな。あれだけの逸品なら五十ポンド以上の値をつけさせるべきだ』こんな具合に彼女は翻弄れているんだ。カラン大聖堂に修道士がた時代なら、彼女は聴罪師に尋ねただろうね。聴罪師は『スンマ・アンゲリカ』(註 道徳神学の辞書と呼ばれる著作)を手に取り、Vの項目――『売るべきか《ウェンデトゥル》?売るべきか 売らざるべきか』――をのぞき、彼女を安心やっただろう。わたしがラテン語でその道の最高の学者とだって話ができるとは知らなかっただろう?ああ、しかしできるんだよ。主任司祭はネビュルスとかネビュルムとか言っおったが、彼の相手だってすることができる。ただわたしはあまり知識をひけらかさないようにいるだけだ。今度わたしの部屋にたら『スンマ』を見せあげよう。けれども今は聴罪師なんてないし、親愛なるプロテスタントのパーキンは『スンマ』を持ったとしても読めやしない。だから彼女の悩みを解決できる人は誰もないんだよ」
"Lastly, worldly wisdom, or what Miss Joliffe thinks wisdom, says, `No, don't sell it; you should get more than fifty pounds for such a gem.' So she is tossed about, and if she'd lived when there were monks in Cullerne Church, she would have asked her father confessor, and he would have taken down his `Summa Angelica,' and looked it out under V.--`_Vendetur? utrum vendetur an non_?'--and set her mind at rest. You didn't know I could chaffer Latin with the best of 'em, did you? Ah, but I can, even with the Rector, for all the _nebulus_ and _nebulum_; only I don't trot it out too often. I'll show you a copy of the `Summa' when you come down to my room; but there aren't any confessors now, and dear Protestant Parkyn couldn't read the `Summa' if he had it; so there is no one to settle the case for her."
小男は気持ちがたかぶって、目を輝かながら自分の学識についてしゃべった。「ラテン語か」と彼は言った。「くそっ。わたしのラテン語は誰にも負けないぞ――そう、ベーズ(註 十六世紀フランスの神学者)にだって負けるものか――ラテン語で思わず耳をふさぎたくなるような話をすることだってできる。ああ、わたしは馬鹿だよ、なんて馬鹿なんだ。『我がパウロよ、パウロ、このふしだらなるページに満足せよ』(註 アウソニウスの詩から)」彼はラテン語でそうつぶやくと神経質そうに指でテーブルを打ち鳴らした。
The little man had worked himself into a state of exaltation, and his eyes twinkled as he spoke of his scholastic attainments. "Latin," he said--"damn it! I can talk Latin against anyone--yes, with Beza himself--and could tell you tales in it which would make you stop your ears. Ah, well, more fool I--more fool I. `_Contentus esto, Paule mi, lasciva, Paule, pagina_,'" he muttered to himself, and drummed nervously with his fingers on the table.
ウエストレイはこうした発作的な興奮を恐れたので、話題を元に戻そうとた。
Westray was apprehensive of these fits of excitement, and led the conversation back to the old theme.
「理解に苦しみますね、こんなまずい絵に価値がないことくらい、たら分かりそうなものなのに――まったくおかしな話ですよ。それにしてもロンドンの業者はどうしてこの絵を買い取ろうとたのでしょう。あの商会はよく知っいるんですが、一流の美術商ですよ」
"It baffles me to understand how _anyone_ with eyes at all could think a daub like this was valuable--that is strange enough; but how come these London people to have made an offer for it? I know the firm quite well; they are first-rate dealers."
「『ポップ・ゴーズ・ザ・ウィーゼル』と『ハレルヤ・コーラス』の違いが分からない人間がいるように、絵を理解ない人間もいるのさ。わたしもそんな人間の一人だ。もちろんきみの言うことは全面的に正しいよ。この絵はまともな人間にとっちゃ目障りでしかない。しかしわたしは長いことたせいか、これが好きになったよ。売られたら残念に思うだろう。それからロンドンのバイヤーたちだが、たぶんどこぞの無知蒙昧の輩がこの絵を気に入っ買いたがっているんじゃないか。たまに一晩か二晩、この部屋に泊まっいく不時の客があったからね――もしかたら、さんざんけなしたにもかかわらず、それはアメリカ人かも知れないよ――あの連中が何をやらかす分かったものではない。マーチン・ジョウリフが死んだ日にも、彼からこの絵を買いあげようとして誰かがたそうだ。あの日の午後は、わたしは聖堂にて、ミス・ジョウリフはドルカス会に行き、アナスタシアは薬剤師のところに行った。家に戻ってからわたしはマーチンの顔を見よ思って、今われわれがいるこの部屋まで上がったんだが、彼は話をたくてうずうずた。彼によると玄関のベルが鳴ったかと思うと、誰かが家の中に入っくる音が聞こえ、ついにはドアが開いて、見知らぬ男が彼の部屋に上がりこんたのだそうだ。マーチンはわたしが今座っいるこの椅子に座った。あの頃は身体が弱って、ここから動くことができなかったんだ。それで男が部屋の中に入っくるまでじっとなければなかったんだよ。見知らぬ男は丁寧な口調で花の絵を買いたい、といったそうだ。なんと二十ポンドも出すというのさ。マーチンはその頼みを聞こうとず、その十倍払う言われても手放すつもりはないと言うと、男は帰っいったそうだ。そういう話なんだが、あのときはただのでまかせで、マーチンは幻覚でもたんだろうと思った。ひどくふらふらて、夢から覚めたばかりみたいに顔が紅潮いるようだったから。でもしゃべっいるとき、彼の目はずるそうな色を浮かべた。そして、あと一週間すれば、おれはブランダマー卿になるんだ、そうなりゃ絵を売りたいなんて思いもないだろう、と言うんだ。彼は妹が戻ったときもそう言ったよ。しかし男の人相については、髪の毛がアナスタシアにいるということ以外、何も言えなかった。
"There are some people," said the organist, "who can't tell `Pop goes the weasel' from the `Hallelujah Chorus,' and others are as bad with pictures. I'm very much that way myself. No doubt all you say is right, and this picture an eyesore to any respectable person, but I've been used to it so long I've got to like it, and should be sorry to see her sell it. And as for these London buyers, I suppose some other ignoramus has taken a fancy to it, and wants to buy. You see, there _have_ been chance visitors staying in this room a night or two between whiles--perhaps even Americans, for all I said about them--and you can never reckon what _they'll_ do. The very day Martin Joliffe died there was a story of someone coming to buy the picture of him. I was at church in the afternoon, and Miss Joliffe at the Dorcas meeting, and Anastasia gone out to the chemist. When I got back, I came up to see Martin in this same room, and found him full of a tale that he had heard the bell ring, and after that someone walking in the house, and last his door opened, and in walked a stranger. Martin was sitting in the chair I'm using now, and was too weak then to move out of it; so he was forced to sit until this man came in. The stranger talked kindly to him, so he said, and wanted to buy the picture of the flowers, bidding as high as twenty pounds for it; but Martin wouldn't hear him, and said he wouldn't let him have it for ten times that, and then the man went away. That was the story, and I thought at the time 'twas all a cock-and-bull tale, and that Martin's mind was wandering; for he was very weak, and seemed flushed too, like one just waken from a dream. But he had a cunning look in his eye when he told me, and said if he lived another week he would be Lord Blandamer himself, and wouldn't want then to sell any pictures. He spoke of it again when his sister came back, but couldn't say what the man was like, except that his hair reminded him of Anastasia's.
マーチンは命数つきて、ちょうどその日の晩に死んだ。ミス・ジョウリフは恐ろしく気を落としたよ。というのは彼女は睡眠薬を与えすぎたのじゃないかと思ったからだ。エニファーは彼が睡眠薬を飲みすぎたのだと彼女に言い、彼女は自分が間違っ渡したのでないかぎり、彼が薬を手に入れるはずがないと考えたのだ。エニファーが死亡証明書を書いたので死因審問はなかった。しかしそのおかげでわれわれは見知らぬ男のことを忘れしまい思い出したときは、もう捜そうにも手遅れになった。もちろん男が病人の頭から生まれた幻じゃないとすれば、なんだけれど。他には誰もないし、手がかりはウエーブた髪の毛だけだ。男はマーチンにアナスタシアを思い起こさたということだからね。しかしそれが本当だとすると、この絵に入れこんだ人間が他にもいたっていうことになる。可哀想なマイケルには大事な絵だったんだろう、こんなに立派な額に入れたんだから」
"But Martin's time was come; he died that very night, and Miss Joliffe was terribly cast down, because she feared she had given him an overdose of sleeping-draught; for Ennefer told her he had taken too much, and she didn't see where he had got it from unless she gave it him by mistake. Ennefer wrote the death certificate, and so there was no inquest; but that put the stranger out of our thoughts until it was too late to find him, if, indeed, he ever was anything more than the phantom of a sick man's brain. No one beside had seen him, and all we had to ask for was a man with wavy hair, because he reminded Martin of Anastasia. But if 'twas true, then there was someone else who had a fancy for the painting, and poor old Michael must have thought a lot of it to frame it in such handsome style."
「どうでしょうかね」ウエストレイは言った。「わたしには額の中を埋めるために絵を描いたような気がするんですけど」
"I don't know," Westray said; "it looks to me as if the picture was painted to fill the frame."
「そうかも知れないね、そうかも知れない」オルガン奏者は素っ気なく言った。 ~~~ 「どうしてマーチン・ジョウリフは、夢の実現は間近いと思ったんでしょう」
"Perhaps so, perhaps so," answered the organist dryly. "What made Martin Joliffe think he was so near success?"
「ああ、そんなこと、わたしには分からないよ。彼はいつも丸を四角に、謎にぴたりと当てはまる欠けた一片を見つけたと思った。しかし彼は自分の企みを他人に打ち明けることをなかった。死んだときに書類でいっぱいの箱をいくつも残しいってね、ミス・ジョウリフが燃やすかわりに調べくれと、それをわたしに寄こしたんだ。そのうち中身をあらためるつもりだが、きっとろくなことは書かれてないだろう。かりに彼が手がかりをつかんたとしても、彼の死とともにそれもなくなっしまったさ」
"Ah, that I can't tell you. He was always thinking he had squared the circle, or found the missing bit to fit into the puzzle; but he kept his schemes very dark. He left boxes full of papers behind him when he died, and Miss Joliffe handed them to me to look over, instead of burning them. I shall go through them some day; but no doubt the whole thing is moonshine, and if he ever had a clue it died with him."
短い沈黙が訪れた。聖セパルカ大聖堂の組鐘が「エフライム山」を奏で、大鐘がカラン・フラットに真夜中を告げた。
There was a little pause; the chimes of Saint Sepulchre's played "Mount Ephraim," and the great bell tolled out midnight over Cullerne Flat.
「ぼちぼち寝る時間だ。ウイスキーを一杯もらえないかね」彼は暖炉の前の三脚台にかけられた薬罐をながらいった。「おしゃべりて喉が渇いた」
"It's time to be turning in. You haven't a drop of whisky, I suppose?" he said, with a glance at the kettle which stood on a trivet in front of the fire; "I have talked myself thirsty."
その懇願には石のような心をも溶かす哀れさがあったが、ウエストレイの原則はびくとも揺るがず、彼はかたくなな態度を貫いた。
There was a pathos in his appeal that would have melted many a stony heart, but Westray's principles were unassailable, and he remained obdurate.
「残念ですが、置いないんですよ。お酒は飲まないので。ココアをお付き合い願えませんか。薬罐が沸きましたから」
"No, I am afraid I have not," he said; "you see, I never take spirits myself. Will you not join me in a cup of cocoa? The kettle boils."
ミスタ・シャーノールはがっかりた。
Mr Sharnall's face fell.
「きみは婆さんになるべきだったな。ココアを飲むのは婆さんだけだ。まあ、それでもいい。急場をしのげれば」
"You ought to have been an old woman," he said; "only old women drink cocoa. Well, I don't mind if I do; any port in a storm."
その晩のオルガン奏者は模範的なくらいしらふの状態でベットに入った。自室に戻ってから棚の中を探したが酒は見つからず、マーテレットがくれた最後のブランデーはお茶の時間に飲んしまい、新たに買おうにも金が一銭もないことを思い出したのだ。
The organist went to bed that night in a state of exemplary sobriety, for when he got down to his own room he could find no spirit in the cupboard, and remembered that he had finished the last bottle of old Martelet's _eau-de-vie_ at his tea, and that he had no money to buy another.
第六章 ~~~
CHAPTER SIX.
一ヶ月後、聖セパルカ大聖堂の修復工事は軌道に乗りはじめた。南袖廊には木の足場が支柱の上に高々と組まれて、石工が内部から穹窿天井に作業の手を加えることができるようになった。この天井が建物の中でもっとも修理の必要な部分であることは疑いを入れないが、ウエストレイは他にも放っておけない危険な箇所があるという事実に目をつぶることができず、サー・ジョージ・ファークワーの注意を脆弱化た複数の部分にむけさせようとた。いずれもこの偉大な建築家の、おざなりな点検をまぬがれた部分である。
A month later the restoration work at Saint Sepulchre's was fairly begun, and in the south transept a wooden platform had been raised on scaffold-poles to such a height as allowed the masons to work at the vault from the inside. This roof was no doubt the portion of the fabric that called most urgently for repair, but Westray could not disguise from himself that delay might prove dangerous in other directions, and he drew Sir George Farquhar's attention to more than one weak spot which had escaped the great architect's cursory inspection.
しかしウエストレイの不安のいちばん底にひそんたのは、塔を支えるアーチへのほの暗い懸念だった。彼は中央塔のとてつもない重量が夢魔のように建物全体に覆いかぶさっいるさまを思い描いた。サー・ジョージ・ファークワーは代理人の説明に充分耳を傾け、特に塔を検査する目的でカランを訪れることにた。彼はある秋の一日を測定や計算に費やし、中断れたピールの話を聞き、壁の割れ目を細かく調べたが、以前の判断を改めたり、塔の安定性に疑いをさしはさむいかなる理由も見いださなかった。彼はやんわりとウエストレイの神経質をからかい、他のところも確かに修理が必要だと同意つつも、不運にも資金が足りないのだから、今のところ工事の規模と進捗は、いずれも限られたものにならざるをないと言った。
But behind all Westray's anxieties lurked that dark misgiving as to the tower arches, and in his fancy the enormous weight of the central tower brooded like the incubus over the whole building. Sir George Farquhar paid sufficient attention to his deputy's representations to visit Cullerne with a special view to examining the tower. He spent an autumn day in making measurements and calculations, he listened to the story of the interrupted peal, and probed the cracks in the walls, but saw no reason to reconsider his former verdict or to impugn the stability of the tower. He gently rallied Westray on his nervousness, and, whilst he agreed that in other places repair was certainly needed, he pointed out that lack of funds must unfortunately limit for the present both the scope of operations and the rate of progress.
カラン大聖堂は他のより大きな修道院とともに千五百三十九年に解体れた。この年、最後の修道院長であったニコラス・ヴィニコウムは王に反抗て修道院の明け渡しを拒否たために西の大門楼の前で反逆者として絞首刑にれた。修道院の一般財源は王室収入増加庁の手に移り、すぐそのまわりの修道院領有地は王室のお抱え医師シャーマンに与えられた。スペルマンは冒涜を主題にたその著作のなかで、修道院の土地がその新たな所有者一族に没落をもたらした例としてカランを挙げている。というのも、シャーマンには放蕩者の息子があって、彼は家督を食いつぶし、その後エリザベス女王の時代にスペインの陰謀家と策動て斬首刑になったのである。 ~~~ ~~~ 悪徳領主にわざわいを ~~~ もたらす僧院領有地 ~~~ 教会堂を盗む者 ~~~ 必ず天の罰を受く ~~~
Cullerne Abbey was dissolved with the larger religious houses in 1539, when Nicholas Vinnicomb, the last abbot, being recalcitrant, and refusing to surrender his house, was hanged as a traitor in front of the great West Gate-house. The general revenues were impropriated by the King's Court of Augmentations, and the abbey lands in the immediate vicinity were given to Shearman, the King's Physician. Spellman, in his book on sacrilege, cites Cullerne as an instance where church lands brought ruin to their new owner's family; for Shearman had a spendthrift son who squandered his patrimony, and then, caballing with Spanish intriguants, came to the block in Queen Elizabeth's days.
こうしてシャーマンの一族は次の世代で完全に絶え果てたが、サー・ジョン・ファインズが地所を買い取り、前任者の悪行をつぐなうために学校と養老院を設立た。この罪滅ぼしは見事に功を奏した。というのも、ホレイショ・ファインズはジェイムズ一世によって貴族に叙せられ、その一家はブランダマーという名をて現在までつづいいるからである。
"For evil hands have abbey lands, Such evil fate in store; Such is the heritage that waits Church-robbers evermore."
修道院が正式に解体れる前日、僧たちは聖堂で最後の祈りのことばを歌った。夜遅く行われたのは、ひとつにはそのほうがこうした別れにふさわしいし、またひとつには一般の注意を引くことがより少ないだろうと思われたからである。王の役人たちはこれ以上儀式を執り行うことを許さないのではないかという心配があったのだ。六本の大きな蝋燭が祭壇の上で燃やされ、壁の蝋燭受けは聖歌隊席の修道士たちが目の前に置いいる祈祷書をいつも通りに照らした。寂しい礼拝だった。慣れ親しんだよき習わしがこれを最後に消えしまうというときはいつも寂しいように。修道士たち、とりわけ年のいった僧たちは明日どこへ行けばよいのか分からず、心を引き裂かれる思いだった。副修道院長は悲嘆のあまり声が途切れ、朗読を中断するありさまだった。
Thus, in the next generation the name of Shearman was clean put away; but Sir John Fynes, purchasing the property, founded the Grammar School and almshouses as a sin-offering for the misdoings of his predecessors. This measure of atonement succeeded admirably, for Horatio Fynes was ennobled by James the First, and his family, with the title of Blandamer, endures to this present.
On the day before the formal dissolution of their house the monks sung the last service in the abbey church. It was held late in the evening, partly because this time seemed to befit such a farewell, and partly that less public attention might be attracted; for there was a doubt whether the King's servants would permit any further ceremonies. Six tall candles burnt upon the altar, and the usual sconces lit the service-books that lay before the brothers in the choir-stalls. It was a sad service, as every good and amiable thing is sad when done for the last time. There were agonising hearts among the brothers, especially among the older monks, who knew not whither to go on the morrow; and the voice of the sub-prior was broken with grief, and failed him as he read the lesson.
The nave was in darkness except for the warming-braziers, which here and there cast a ruddy glow on the vast Norman pillars. In the obscurity were gathered little groups of townsmen. The nave had always been open for their devotions in happier days, and at the altars of its various chapels they were accustomed to seek the means of grace. That night they met for the last time--some few as curious spectators, but most in bitterness of heart and profound sorrow, that the great church with its splendid services was lost to them for ever. They clustered between the pillars of the arcades; and, the doors that separated the nave from the choir being open, they could look through the stone screen, and see the serges twinking far away on the high altar.
身廊は暗闇に包まれ、ところどころに置かれた火鉢が巨大なノルマン様式の柱を赤く照らしいるだけだった。その暗がりに町の人々が小さな集団を作ったたずんた。今より幸せだった頃の身廊はいつも町の人に開放れてて、彼らはいくつもある礼拝堂の祭壇で恵みの手段にあずかろうとたものだ。その晩彼らは、修道院の最後を見届け集まった――好奇心からた者も数名はたけれど、ほとんどは偉大な聖堂が素晴らしい礼拝とともに永遠に失われるのだというつらい思いと、深い悲しみを抱いやってきたのだった。彼らはアーケードの柱のあいだにたむろた。身廊と聖歌隊席をへだてるドアが開いたので、石の障壁のむこう、遠く主祭壇の上にあや織りの毛織物が輝いいるのが見えた。
Among all the sad hearts in the abbey church, there was none sadder than that of Richard Vinnicomb, merchant and wool-stapler. He was the abbot's elder brother, and to all the bitterness naturally incident to the occasion was added in his case the grief that his brother was a prisoner in London, and would certainly be tried for his life.
聖堂の中でもっとも悲しみにくれたのは、商人であり羊毛選別人でもあるリチャード・ヴィニコウムだった。彼は修道院長の兄で、もちろん修道院がなくなることに心を痛めたが、彼の場合はさらに、弟がロンドンで囚われの身となっいること、そしてまず確実に死罪に問われるだろうということが悲しみをいっそう深いものにた。
He stood in the deep shadow of the pier that supported the north-west corner of the tower, weighed down with sorrow for the abbot and for the fall of the abbey, and uncertain whether his brother's condemnation would not involve his own ruin. It was December 6, Saint Nicholas' Day, the day of the abbot's patron saint. He was near enough to the choir to hear the collect being read on the other side of the screen:
彼は塔の北西の角を支える基柱の暗い影に立ち、修道院長の運命と修道院の消滅を思って悲しみに打ちひしがれてた。しかも弟への有罪の宣告が彼自身の破滅を招かないとは断言できなかった。その日は十二月六日、聖ニコラスの日、つまり修道院長の守護聖人の日だった。聖歌隊席の近くにた彼は、壁のむこうで集祷文が読み上げられるのを聞いた。
"_Deus qui beatum Nicolaum pontificem innumeris decorasti miraculis: tribue quaesumus ut ejus mentis, et precibus, a gehennae incendiis liberemur, per Dominum nostrum Jesum Christum. Amen_."
「神よ、汝の司祭、聖ニコラスに数知れぬ奇跡を行わしめし神よ、かの聖人の善行と祈りにより、主イエス・キリストを通じて、われらを地獄の火より救い給え。アーメン」 ~~~ 「アーメン」かれは基柱の影で言った。「聖人ニコラスよ、わたしをお救いください。聖人ニコラスよ、わたしたち皆をお救いください。聖人ニコラスよ、わたしの弟をお救いください。弟がこの世を去らねばならないのなら、主キリストにお祈りください、主がいち早く選民をお選びになり、わたしたちを主の永遠の楽園で再び相まみえさせ給わんことを」
"Amen," he said in the shadow of his pillar. "Blessed Nicholas, save me; blessed Nicholas, save us all; blessed Nicholas, save my brother, and, if he must lose this temporal life, pray to our Lord Christ that He will shortly accomplish the number of His elect, and reunite us in His eternal Paradise."
彼は心痛のあまり手を握り締め、まわりに立った人々は、火鉢の火影が彼にあたったとき、涙がその頬を流れ落ちるのをた。
He clenched his hands in his distress, and, as a flicker from the brazier fell upon him, those standing near saw the tears run down his cheeks.
「み教えを地にあまねく広めしニコラスよ、われらのために取りなし、罪の清め受けさせたまえ」と司祭者が言い、僧たちの交唱がつづいた。 ~~~ 「そはこの世を卑し、天つ国へむかいしお方」
"_Nicholas qui omnem terram doctrina replevisti, intercede pro peccatis nostris_," said the officiant; and the monks gave the antiphon:
侍者が祭壇の灯火を一つ一つ消し、最後の一本が消えると、僧たちはその場に立ち上がり、列をなして退出た。そのあいだオルガンは破れ窓に鳴る風のような悲しい哀歌を演奏た。
"_Iste est qui contempsit vitam mundi et pervenit ad coelestia regna_."
修道院長は門楼の前で縛り首にれたが、リチャード・ヴィニコウムの財産は没収を免れた。大聖堂がそのまま建築資材として売り出されたとき、彼はそれを三百ポンドで買い取り教区に寄贈た。彼の祈りの一部はかなえられた。というのは一年もたたて死が彼を弟と再会たからである。彼はその敬虔な遺言書の中にこう書いいる。「わが魂を、作り主に救い主たる全能の神にささげ、御心のままに神と聖母と聖人のもとにゆかん。また聖セパルカ大聖堂をその備品を含めてカラン教区に遺贈。上記教区民は上記聖堂、備品、あるいはそのいかなる一部をも永劫に売却、変更、譲渡べからず」ウエストレイが修復なければならない聖堂はこのようにて歴史的危機を脱したのだった。
One by one a server put out the altar-lights, and as the last was extinguished the monks rose in their places, and walked out in procession, while the organ played a dirge as sad as the wind in a ruined window.
リチャード・ヴィニコウムの寛大さは単に聖堂の買い取りだけにとどまらず、日々の礼拝の威厳を保つために多額の金を残し、礼拝堂付き司祭を二名、オルガン奏者を一名、聖歌隊員を十名、少年聖歌隊員を十六名増やした。しかし管財人の怠慢と、信仰の深さでは迷信深いリチャード老人をしのぐ人々の情熱が、この基金を大幅にすり減らした。カランの歴代主任司祭は、自分たちの勤労に対する報酬を増やし、毎日の聖歌歌唱という口先だけの信心につぎこむ金を減らしたほうが、この町の信仰にとって有益であると確信た。こういうわけで主任司祭の俸給はしだいにふくれあがり、参事会員パーキンは就任てすぐにオルガン奏者への支払いという贅沢を切りつめ、その年収を二百ポンドから八十ポンドに減額することで、自分の生活費をきっかり二千ポンドに増やす機会をた。
The abbot was hanged before his abbey gate, but Richard Vinnicomb's goods escaped confiscation; and when the great church was sold, as it stood, for building material, he bought it for three hundred pounds, and gave it to the parish. One part of his prayer was granted, for within a year death reunited him to his brother; and in his pious will he bequeathed his "sowle to Allmyhtie God his Maker and Redemer, to have the fruition of the Deitie with Our Blessed Ladie and all Saints and the Abbey Churche of Saint Sepulchre with the implements thereof, to the Paryshe of Cullerne, so that the said Parishioners shall not sell, alter, or alienate the said Churche, or Implements or anye part or parcell thereof for ever." Thus it was that the church which Westray had to restore was preserved at a critical period of its history.
この節減計画により平日の朝の礼拝は廃止となったが、夕べの祈りはいまでも午後三時にカラン大聖堂で執り行われた。それは修道院時代からつづく礼拝の、消えゆく薄い影であり、参事会員パーキンは、それがだんだんと小さくなり、いつか雲散霧消することを願った。そうした形式主義は必ずや真の信仰を窒息せるに違いないし、彼自身の美声と個人的魅力が聴衆に感動を与えるべき多くの祈りが、意味のない詠唱によって絶えず邪魔れるのを遺憾に思ったのである。彼はおのれの高潔な信条を曲げて、哀れなリチャード・ヴィニコウムが聖歌隊学校に与えた手当をしぶしぶ認めた。そして平日の礼拝を几帳面に欠席することで、そうした無意味に対する非難をぬかりなく表明た。こうした事情からこの儀式は白髪のミスタ・ヌート、主イエス・キリストの大義に熱情を注ぐあまり、みずからの利益を求める機会を失い、六十五才になった今もカランの片田舎で不当に安い給料をもらいながら牧師補の地位に留まっているミスタ・ヌートに任されてた。
Richard Vinnicomb's generosity extended beyond the mere purchase of the building, for he left in addition a sum to support the dignity of a daily service, with a complement of three chaplains, an organist, ten singing-men, and sixteen choristers. But the negligence of trustees and the zeal of more religious-minded men than poor superstitious Richard had sadly diminished these funds. Successive rectors of Cullerne became convinced that the spiritual interests of the town would be better served by placing a larger income at their own disposal for good works, and by devoting less to the mere lip-service of much daily singing. Thus, the stipend of the Rector was gradually augmented, and Canon Parkyn found an opportunity soon after his installation to increase the income of the living to a round two thousand by curtailing extravagance in the payment of an organist, and by reducing the emoluments of that office from two hundred to eighty pounds a year.
それゆえ、平日の午後四時に聖セパルカ大聖堂に居合わせた人は誰でも白い法衣の短い行列が南袖廊の聖具室からあらわれ曲がりくねるように歩きながら聖歌隊席へと進むのを目にするだろう。教会事務員ジャナウエイが銀色の頭部を持つ職杖をたずさえて先頭に立ち、そのあとを八人の少年聖歌隊員がつづく。(リチャード・ヴィニコウムによって定められた人数は半分に減らされてた)さらにそのあとにつづいたのが、いちばん若い者でも五十才という五人の聖歌隊員で、しんがりを勤めたのはミスタ・ヌートだった。行列が聖歌隊席に入ると、事務員は後ろの障壁のドアを閉めて、司宰者たちの心から外の世界の思惑を断ち切り、身廊から俗人が侵入て礼拝の妨げとならないようにた。もっともこの外部の俗人というのは現実的というよりは理論上の存在で、夏の盛りをのぞいて、訪問者の姿は身廊にも聖堂の他のどこにもめったにられはなかった。カランは主だった都市のいずれからも遠く離れたし、考古学的興味はこの当時すっかり下火で、専門的な古物研究家以外、この大修道院の壮麗さを知る者はほとんどなかったのだ。よその人間がカランのことなどいささかも気にかけなかったとすれば、平日の礼拝に対する住人たちの態度はそれに輪をかけた無関心ぶりで、天蓋付き聖職者席の前にある信者席はいつもがらんとた。
It was true that this scheme of economy included the abolition of the week-day morning-service, but at three o'clock in the afternoon evensong was still rehearsed in Cullerne Church. It was the thin and vanishing shadow of a cathedral service, and Canon Parkyn hoped that it might gradually dwindle away until it was dispersed to nought. Such formalism must certainly throttle any real devotion, and it was regrettable that many of the prayers in which his own fine voice and personal magnetism must have had a moving effect upon his hearers should be constantly obscured by vain intonations. It was only by doing violence to his own high principles that he constrained himself to accept the emoluments which poor Richard Vinnicomb had provided for a singing foundation, and he was scrupulous in showing his disapproval of such vanities by punctilious absence from the week-day service. This ceremony was therefore entrusted to white-haired Mr Noot, whose zeal in his Master's cause had left him so little opportunity for pushing his own interests that at sixty he was stranded as an underpaid curate in the backwater of Cullerne.
At four o'clock, therefore, on a week-day afternoon, anyone who happened to be in Saint Sepulchre's Church might see a little surpliced procession issue from the vestries in the south transept, and wind its way towards the choir. It was headed by clerk Janaway, who carried a silver-headed mace; then followed eight choristers (for the number fixed by Richard Vinnicomb had been diminished by half); then five singing-men, of whom the youngest was fifty, and the rear was brought up by Mr Noot. The procession having once entered the choir, the clerk shut the doors of the screen behind it, that the minds of the officiants might be properly removed from contemplation of the outer world, and that devotion might not be interrupted by any intrusion of profane persons from the nave. These outside Profane existed rather in theory than fact, for, except in the height of summer, visitors were rarely seen in the nave or any other part of the building. Cullerne lay remote from large centres, and archaeologic interest was at this time in so languishing a condition that few, except professed antiquaries, were aware of the grandeur of the abbey church. If strangers troubled little about Cullerne, the interest of the inhabitants in the week-day service was still more lukewarm, and the pews in front of the canopied stalls remained constantly empty.
こういうわけで日々ミスタ・ヌートが朗読、オルガン奏者のミスタ・シャーノールがオルガンを演奏、聖歌隊員と少年聖歌隊員が歌を歌うのはひとえに教会事務員ジャナウエイのためだった。他にそれを聴く者は一人もなかったのである。しかし音楽を愛好する訪問者がそんな折りに聖堂に入ったなら、彼は礼拝に深い感銘を受けただろう。ホメロスの詩の妻がありあわせの品を使って客にできるかぎりのもてなしをたように、ミスタ・シャーノールは欠陥のあるオルガンと不出来な聖歌隊を最大限に活用たのだ。彼は洗練れた趣味とすぐれた資質の持ち主だった。歌声が穹窿天井におごそかに響き渡るのを聴けば、心の広い批評家ならかすれた声や空気漏れのする送風器やがたがたと鳴るトラッカーなど少しも気にず、陽光と色ガラスと十八世紀音楽がむつまじく融け合った記憶を胸に抱い帰るだろう。もしかたら澄んだソプラノの声も彼の印象に残るかも知れない。ミスタ・シャーノールは少年聖歌隊の育成と歌の才能の発掘に定評があった。
Thus, Mr Noot read, and Mr Sharnall the organist played, and the choir-men and choristers sang, day by day, entirely for clerk Janaway's benefit, because there was no one else to listen to them. Yet, if a stranger given to music ever entered the church at such times, he was struck with the service; for, like the Homeric housewife who did the best with what she had by her, Mr Sharnall made the most of his defective organ and inadequate choir. He was a man if much taste and resource, and, as the echoes of the singing rolled round the vaulted roofs, a generous critic thought little of cracked voices and leaky bellows and rattling trackers, but took away with him an harmonious memory of sunlight and coloured glass and eighteenth-century music; and perhaps of some clear treble voice, for Mr Sharnall was famed for training boys and discovering the gift of song.
修復工事が開始れて迎えた十月、聖ルカ祭の秋晴れは、まことにその名にふさわしいものとなった。この月の中旬には、本物の夏を思わせる、珍しく晴れた日がつづき、風はよとも吹かず、陽の光があまりにもぽかぽかと照りつけるものだから、カラン・フラットにかかる柔らかなもやをた人が、八月が戻ったと考えたとしても無理からぬことだった。
Saint Luke's little summer, in the October that followed the commencement of the restoration, amply justified its name. In the middle of the month there were several days of such unusual beauty as to recall the real summer, and the air was so still and the sunshine so warm that anyone looking at the soft haze on Cullerne Flat might well have thought that August had returned.
カラン大聖堂は夏の暑さの中でも概してすがすがしいほど涼気に満ちいるのだが、この季節はずれの秋の暑気つづきには、さすがに外のいきれとけだるさが幾分か聖堂の中にもしみこんたようだった。ある土曜日など普段以上の眠気が午後の礼拝を襲った。聖歌隊は詩篇を歌い終えると、どっかと椅子に腰を下ろし、ミスタ・ヌートが第一日課を朗読はじめるや、人目をはばからず睡魔に身をゆだねた。もちろん全員が眠気に朦朧とたわけではなく、賞賛に値する例外もあった。北側聖歌隊席ではかすれ声のアルトがしゃがれ声のテノールと活発な議論を戦わた。彼らは机の下でとりわけ見事に育ったネギを比べあった。二人はどちらも園芸家で、秋のネギ品評会が迫ったのである。南側聖歌隊席ではソプラノを歌う赤毛の小男パトリック・オブンズがオールドリッチ作曲「マニフィカト」ト長調の楽譜に手を加え、タイトルを「マグニファイド・キャット(拡大れた猫)」に変えやろうと眠る暇もなかった。
Cullerne Minster was, as a rule, refreshingly cool in the warmth of summer, but something of the heat and oppressiveness of the outside air seemed to have filtered into the church on these unseasonably warm autumn days. On a certain Saturday a more than usual drowsiness marked the afternoon service. The choir plumped down into their places when the Psalms were finished, and abandoned themselves to slumber with little attempt at concealment, as Mr Noot began the first lesson. There were, indeed, honourable exceptions to the general somnolence. On the cantoris side the worn-out alto held an animated conversation with the cracked tenor. They were comparing some specially fine onions under the desk, for both were gardeners and the autumn leek-show was near at hand. On the decani side Patrick Ovens, a red-haired little treble, was kept awake by the necessity for altering _Magnificat_ into _Magnified Cat_ in his copy of Aldrich in G.
第一日課は長々とつづいた。ミスタ・ヌートはきわめて穏やかな情け深い人物だったが、朗読では、聖書の中でも糾弾激しい一節を読むのを得意とた。確かに英国国教会祈祷書は午後の日課に「ソロモンの知恵」の一部を読むよう指定いるが、ミスタ・ヌートは権威を軽んじ、代わりにイザヤ書からの一節を読んだ。このようなやり方に疑問を突きつけられたなら、彼は聖書外典は行為についての教訓としても、とても容認できないから、と釈明ただろう(註 英国聖公会では聖書外典を生活の模範および行為についての教訓のために読むいる)。(それにカランにはこの個人的判断の権利に異議を申し立てそうな人間はひとりもなかった)しかし自分でも気がついなかっただろうけれど、本当は熱弁をふるう適当な一節を探したかったから、そうたのである。天罰を下す雷鳴の如きその声には、彼の信じるところ、至高の正義を恐れる気持ちと、あやまてる、しかし忘れ去られて久しい民の盲目さに対する無限の哀れみがこめられているはずであった。実際彼はいわゆるバイブル・ボイスと言われるものを持って、朗読の際、普段の生活ではけっして使われないような声音を用い、聖書にいっそうの重々しさを与えることができた。駆け出しの牧師補が「死の時にて裁きの日」とささやいて、嘆願《リタニー》に厳粛さを付け加えるようなものである。
The lesson was a long one. Mr Noot, mildest and most beneficent of men, believed that he was at his best in denunciatory passages of Scripture. The Prayer-Book, it was true, had appointed a portion of the Book of Wisdom for the afternoon lesson, but Mr Noot made light of authorities, and read instead a chapter from Isaiah. If he had been questioned as to this proceeding, he would have excused himself by saying that he disapproved of the Apocrypha, even for instruction of manners (and there was no one at Cullerne at all likely to question this right of private judgment), but his real, though perhaps unconscious, motive was to find a suitable passage for declamation. He thundered forth judgments in a manner which combined, he believed, the terrors of supreme justice with an infinite commiseration for the blindness of errant, but long-forgotten peoples. He had, in fact, that "Bible voice" which seeks to communicate additional solemnity to the Scriptures by reciting them in a tone never employed in ordinary life, as the fledgling curate adds gravity to the Litany by whispering "the hour of death and Day of Judgment."
ミスタ・ヌートは近視のためにいにしえの民への天罰がうたた寝する聴衆の頭の上を素通りいくのが分からなかった。そして彼が長い日課をそれにふさわしい劇的な締めくくりで終えようとたとき、思わぬ珍事が起きた。障壁のドアが開いて、見知らぬ男が入ったのだ。カール大帝の臣将が角笛を吹き鳴らし、百年の安らぎを破って、魔法にかかった王女とその廷臣たちを蘇らたように、うつらうつらとた聖職者たちは闖入者によってはっと夢から目覚めさせられた。少年聖歌隊員はくすくす笑い、聖歌隊員は目を見開き、教会事務員ジャナウエイはこの無分別な飛び入りの頭を打ち砕かんと職杖を握り締めた。みんながざわついたのでミスタ・シャーノールは落ちつかなげに音栓をみやった。彼は寝過ごして聖歌隊がマニフィカトを歌うために立ち上がったものと思ったのだ。
Mr Noot, being short-sighted, did not see how lightly the punishments of these ancient races passed over the heads of his dozing audience, and was bringing the long lesson to a properly dramatic close when the unexpected happened: the screen-door opened and a stranger entered. As the blowing of a horn by the paladin broke the repose of a century, and called back to life the spellbound princess and her court, so these slumbering churchmen were startled from their dreams by the intruder. The choir-boys fell to giggling, the choir-men stared, clerk Janaway grasped his mace as if he would brain so rash an adventurer, and the general movement made Mr Sharnall glance nervously at his stops; for he thought that he had overslept himself, and that the choir had stood up for the _Magnificat_.
見知らぬ男は自分の姿が皆の注目を喚起たことなどまったく気づいてないようだった。偶然訪れた観光客であることは明らかで、たぶん障壁のドアを開けるまで礼拝が行われていることを知らなかったのだろう。しかしいったん中にはいると、彼は式に参加することを決意、信徒席につながる踏み段のほうへ歩いいった。とたんに教会事務員のジャナウエイが飛び出し、芝居の脇台詞よりもやや大きめの声で彼にむかって教会の規則を口にた。
The stranger seemed unconscious of the attention which his appearance provoked. He was no doubt some casual sightseer, and had possibly been unaware that any service was in progress until he opened the screen-door. But once there, he made up his mind to join in the devotions, and was walking to the steps which led up to the stalls when clerk Janaway popped out of his place and accosted him, quoting the official regulations in something louder than a stage whisper:
「礼拝中は聖歌隊席に入っちゃいけません。だめですよ」 ~~~ 見知らぬ男は老人の横柄な態度を面白がってた。
"Ye cannot enter the choir during the hours of Divine service. Ye cannot come in."
「もう入っますよ」彼はささやき返した。「どうせ入ったんですから、よろしければ、礼拝が終わるまで席に座ったいですね」
The stranger was amused at the old man's officiousness.
教会事務員はしばらく疑わしそうな視線をむけた。相手の顔に面白がっている様子が読み取れたとすれば、そこには同時に反論を思いとどまらせる決意もあらわれおり、彼は考え直した結果、カラン大聖堂聖職者席の下に並ぶ信者席の開き戸の一つを押し開けた。
"I am in," he whispered back, "and, being in, will take a seat, if you please, until the service is over."
しかし見知らぬ男は自分がそこに招かれているということが分からなかったらしく、その信者席を通り過ぎ、小さな踏み段を上がって北側聖歌隊に面した席にむかった。歌い手たちのすぐ後ろには五つの席があって、そこには他の席のものより豪華で手のこんだ天蓋がかかり、背に紋章の楯が描かれてた。この席は色あせた深紅色の細引きによって一般庶民が入れないようになったが、見知らぬ男は紐を留め金からはずし、まるで自分の所有物であるかのように手近の指定席に座ったのだった。
The clerk looked at him doubtfully for a moment, but if there was amusement to be read in the other's countenance, there was also a decision that did not encourage opposition. So he thought better of the matter, and opened the door of one of the pews that run below the stalls in Cullerne Church.
But the stranger did not appear to notice that a place was being shown him, and walked past the pew and up the little steps that led to the stalls on the cantoris side. Directly behind the singing-men were five stalls, which had canopies richer and more elaborate than those of the others, with heraldic escutcheons painted on the backs. From these seats the vulgar herd was excluded by a faded crimson cord, but the stranger lifted the cord from its hook, and sat down in the first reserved seat, as if the place belonged to him.
教会事務員のジャナウエイは激怒、大あわてで踏み段をのぼり、いきり立つ七面鳥のように彼のあとを追いかけた。
Clerk Janaway was outraged, and bustled up the steps after him like an angry turkey-cock.
「おい、おい!」彼は侵入者の肩に手を触れ言った。「ここに座ってはいかん。フォーディングの席なんだから。ここはブランダマー一族の席だ」
"Come, come!" he said, touching the intruder on the shoulder; "you cannot sit here; these are the Fording seats, and kep' for Lord Blandamer's family."
「ブランダマー卿が家族を連れたら場所を空けるよ」と見知らぬ男は言い、老人がなおも攻撃を仕掛けようといるのをて「静かに!いい加減にたまえ」と付け加えた。
"I will make room if Lord Blandamer brings his family," the stranger said; and, seeing that the old man was returning to the attack, added, "Hush! that is enough."
教会事務員はもう一度彼をて、自分の席に戻った。完敗だった。
The clerk looked at him again, and then turned back to his own place, routed.
「その日かれらが嘯響《なりどよ》めくこと海のなりどよめくがごとし。もし地をのぞまば暗《くらき》と難《なやみ》とありて、光は黒雲のなかにくらくなりたるをん」とミスタ・ヌートは言い、大きな丸い眼鏡の底から非難のまなざしを聴衆一同にむけて、聖書を閉じた。
"_And in that day they shall roar against thee like the roaring of the sea, and if one look unto the land behold darkness and sorrow, and the light is darkened in the heavens thereof_," said Mr Noot, and shut the book, with a glance of general fulmination through his great round spectacles.
侵入者に体現れる無法と、教会事務員に体現れる権威の衝突を、興味深そうにずっと眺めた聖歌隊は、オルガンがマニフィカトを演奏はじめたので立ち上がった。
The choir, who had been interested spectators of this conflict of lawlessness as personified in the intruder, and authority as in the clerk, rose to their feet as the organ began the _Magnificat_.
The singing-men exchanged glances of amusement, for they were not altogether averse to seeing the clerk worsted. He was an autocrat in his own church, and ruffled them now and again with what they called his bumptiousness. Perhaps he did assume a little as he led the procession, for he forgot at times that he was a peaceable servant of the sanctuary, and fancied, as he marched mace in hand to the music of the organ, that he was a daring officer leading a forlorn hope. That very afternoon he had had a heated discussion in the vestry with Mr Milligan, the bass, on a question of gardening, and the singer, who still smarted under the clerk's overbearing tongue, was glad to emphasise his adversary's defeat by paying attention to the intruder.
歌い手たちが顔を見合わせ、にやにやたのは、教会事務員がへこまされるのをて悪い気がなかったからである。彼は聖堂の中をわが物顔に歩く専制君主で、みんなから「思い上がっいる」と言われる態度で、ときどき彼らの腹を立てさせた。もしかすると彼は行列の先頭に立って少々いい気になったのかも知れない。オルガンの音楽に合わせて職杖を手に行進いると、聖なる場所の、平和の使徒であることを忘れて、たった一つの希望を率いる勇敢な士官になったような気分になることが、たまにあったからである。ちょうどその日の午後は聖具室でバスのミスタ・ミリガンと園芸の問題をめぐって激しく口論た。教会事務員の高圧的な喋り方にいまだ機嫌を損ねた歌い手は嬉しそうに侵入者に注意をむけ、敵にその敗北を思い知らせた。
The tenor on the cantoris side was taking holiday that day, and Mr Milligan availed himself of the opportunity to offer the absentee's copy of the service to the intruder, who was sitting immediately behind him. He turned round, and placed the book, open at the _Magnificat_, before the stranger with much deference, casting as he faced round again a look of misprision at Janaway, of which the latter was quick to appreciate, the meaning.
その日、北側聖歌隊のテノールが休んたので、ミスタ・ミリガンはこれ幸いと、欠席者のサーヴィスの楽譜を自分のすぐ後ろに座っいる侵入者に貸し与えた。彼は振り返って見知らぬ男の前にマニフィカトの頁を開いたままうやうやしく楽譜を置いた。むき直るときはジャナウエイに軽蔑のまなざしをむけ、ジャナウエイはすばやくその意味を察知た。
This by-play was lost upon the stranger, who nodded his acknowledgment of the civility, and turned to the study of the score which had been offered him.
見知らぬ男はこの脇役たちの演技には気づかず、好意に感謝うなずくと、差し出された楽譜を真剣に読みはじめた。 ~~~ 男声が極端に不足たため、ミスタ・シャーノールは南側ないし北側の声部に穴が空くことには慣れっこになった。詩篇を歌う際は、欠けた声部を左手で補い、必死になって不完全を取り繕おうとたのだが、しかしマニフィカトの演奏を始めると、豊かな、実に力強いテノールが情感をこめ、正確に歌唱に加わるのを聞いてびっくりた。穴を埋めたのは見知らぬ男で、最初の驚きが過ぎ去ると、聖歌隊は彼を自分たちの技術に精通する者として歓迎、教会事務員ジャナウエイは彼が入ったときの無礼や、ミスタ・ミリガンの反抗的な態度すらも忘れしまった。大人も少年たちも新しい生命を歌った。実際彼らはこれほどの心得の持ち主には是非とも好い印象を与えたいと思い、その聖歌はカラン大聖堂ではひさしぶりに聴く出色のでき映えとなった。ただ見知らぬ男だけはまったくの冷静だった。彼は今までずっと聖歌助手であったかのように歌った。マニフィカトが終わり、ミスタ・シャーノールがオルガンのある二階の張り出しからカーテンの隙間を通してのぞくと、彼が聖書を手にミスタ・ヌートの第二日課を熱心に聞いいる姿が見えた。
Mr Sharnall's resources in the way of men's voices were so limited that he was by no means unused to finding himself short of a voice-part on the one side or the other. He had done his best to remedy the deficiency in the Psalms by supplying the missing part with his left hand, but as he began the _Magnificat_ he was amazed to hear a mellow and fairly strong tenor taking part in the service with feeling and precision. It was the stranger who stood in the gap, and when the first surprise was past, the choir welcomed him as being versed in their own arts, and Clerk Janaway forgot the presumption of his entrance and even the rebellious conduct of Mr Milligan. The men and boys sang with new life; they wished, in fact, that so knowledgeable a person should be favourably impressed, and the service was rendered in a more creditable way than Cullerne Church had known for many a long day. Only the stranger was perfectly unmoved. He sang as if he had been a lay-vicar all his life, and when the _Magnificat_ was ended, and Mr Sharnall could look through the curtains of the organ-loft, the organist saw him with a Bible devoutly following Mr Noot in the second lesson.
年の頃は四十、中背というよりもやや背が高く、黒い眉毛に黒い髪、ただし白いものもちらほら見えはじめた。特に髪の毛はふさふさと豊かで、自然に波打つ巻き毛がすぐさま見る人の注意を奪った。髭はきれいに剃られ、顔の輪郭は鋭いが痩せいるわけではなく、引き締まった口元には何か蔑むような表情が浮かんた。鼻筋が通り、力強い顔は他人を服従せることに慣れいることを感じさせる。聖歌隊席の反対側から彼を見ると、その姿は素晴らしい一幅の絵になった。黒いオークでできた修道院長ヴィニコウムの席がちょうどその額縁の役割を果たした。頭上には天蓋があり、その先端は葉飾りや頂華に飾られ、座席の木の背板には楯が描かれてた。よく見るとそれは緑色と銀色の雲形線を持つブランダマー家の紋章だった。恐らくそのあまりにも堂々とた風采のためなのだろう、赤毛のパトリック・オブンズはちょうどその日手に入れたオーストラリアの切手を取り出し、王冠をかぶってゴシック風の椅子に座るヴィクトリア女王の肖像を隣の少年に指し示した。
He was a man of forty, rather above the middle height, with dark eyebrows and dark hair, that was beginning to turn grey. His hair, indeed, at once attracted the observer's attention by its thick profusion and natural wavy curl. He was clean-shaven, his features were sharply cut without being thin, and there was something contemptuous about the firm mouth. His nose was straight, and a powerful face gave the impression of a man who was accustomed to be obeyed. To anyone looking at him from the other side of the choir, he presented a remarkable picture, for which the black oak of Abbot Vinnicomb's stalls supplied a frame. Above his head the canopy went soaring up into crockets and finials, and on the woodwork at the back was painted a shield which nearer inspection would have shown to be the Blandamer cognisance, with its nebuly bars of green and silver. It was, perhaps, so commanding an appearance that made red-haired Patrick Ovens take out an Australian postage-stamp which he had acquired that very day, and point out to the boy next to him the effigy of Queen Victoria sitting crowned in a gothic chair.
見知らぬ男はすっかり合唱にのめりこんいるようだった。彼はおじることなく歌唱に加わり、もう一冊楽譜を与えられると、アンセムでも補欠としてめざましい活躍を見せた。祝福が終わって、聖歌隊が列をなして退出するときは礼儀正しく起立、礼拝後のボランタリーを聴くために再び席についた。ミスタ・シャーノールは見知らぬテノールに対する敬意のしるしとして名曲を演奏しようと決め、「聖アンのフーガ」をオルガンの状態が許すかぎり見事に弾い見せたのだった。確かにトラッカーがひどくがたつき、自が第二主題を台無しにしまった。しかし張り出しから下に延びる螺旋階段を降りきったとき、見知らぬ男が彼を待って賞賛のことばをかけた。
The stranger seemed to enter thoroughly into the spirit of the performance; he bore his part in the service bravely, and, being furnished with another book, lent effective aid with the anthem. He stood up decorously as the choir filed out after the Grace, and then sat down again in his seat to listen to the voluntary. Mr Sharnall determined to play something of quality as a tribute to the unknown tenor, and gave as good a rendering of the Saint Anne's fugue as the state of the organ would permit. It was true that the trackers rattled terribly, and that a cipher marred the effect of the second subject; but when he got to the bottom of the little winding stairs that led down from the loft, he found the stranger waiting with a compliment.
「ありがとうございました。あなたのおかげで素晴らしいフーガが聴けました。この聖堂にたのはひさしぶりですよ。天気のいい午後を選んだのは幸運でした。皆さんの礼拝に間に合ったことも」
"Thank you very much," he said; "it is very kind of you to give us so fine a fugue. It is many years since I was last in this church, and I am fortunate to have chosen so sunny an afternoon, and to have been in time for your service."
「とんでもないよ、とんでもない」とオルガン奏者は言った。「幸運だったのはわれわれのほうだ、きみに助けもらえて。初見で楽譜も読めるし、いい声をいる。ただシメオン賛歌のグロリアの出だしをちょっと間違えたね」彼は念のため、その部分を歌っ見せた。「きみは教会音楽を理解いるし、きっと礼拝で何度も歌った経験があるんだろうね。ちょっとそんなふうには見えないんだけど」と彼は相手を頭からつま先までしげしげ見つめながら言い添えた。
"Not at all, not at all," said the organist; "it is we who are fortunate in having you to help us. You read well, and have a useful voice, though I caught you tripping a little in the lead of the _Nunc Dimittis_ Gloria." And he sung it over by way of reminder. "You understand church music, and have sung many a service before, I am sure, though you don't look much given that way," he added, scanning him up and down.
見知らぬ男はこの無遠慮な批評を不快に思ういうより面白がってた。教義問答はつづいた。
The stranger was amused rather than offended at these blunt criticisms, and the catechising went on.
「カランに宿泊いるのかい」
"Are you stopping in Cullerne?"
「いいえ」と相手は丁寧に答えた。「日帰りなんですが、また機会を見つけてこの聖堂の礼拝を聞きたいと思います。次に来るときは、きっと合唱隊を全員揃えくださいね。そうすれば今日よりもくつろい聞くことができるでしょうから」
"No," the other replied courteously; "I am only here for the day, but I hope I may find other occasions to visit the place and to hear your service. You will have your full complement of voices next time I come, no doubt, and I shall be able to listen more at my ease than to-day?"
「いやいや無理だな。十中八九、今日よりもっとひどいだろう。われわれは貧乏でね、しかもはるばるマケドニアまでわれわれを助けにくれる者は誰もおらんのだ(註 使徒行伝から)。呪われた司祭どもは蛾の幼虫みたいに資産を食い荒らし、音楽をつづけるためにとっておかれた金で私腹を肥やしいる。今日の午後朗読をたあの気の小さい老人のことじゃないよ。彼もわれわれと同じで、こき使われる身分なのさ――かわいそうなヌート!彼は靴の底を張り替える金がないのでハトロン紙を長靴に詰めこまなきゃならん。悪いのは主任司祭の家に住む盗賊バラバだ。あいつが株式投資を、礼拝を餓死せようといるのさ」
"Oh no, you won't. It's ten to one you will find us still worse off. We are a poverty-stricken lot, and no one to come over into Macedonia to help us. These cursed priests eat up our substance like canker-worms, and grow sleek on the money that was left to keep the music going. I don't mean the old woman that read this afternoon; he's got _his_ nose on the grindstone like the rest of us--poor Noot! He has to put brown paper in his boots because he can't afford to have them resoled. No, it's the Barabbas in the rectory-house, that buys his stocks and shares, and starves the service."
この手厳しい非難は見知らぬ男の耳を右から左へ抜けいった。彼の心は千マイルもかなたにあるかのようだった。オルガン奏者は話題を変えた。 ~~~ 「オルガンは弾くかね。オルガンは分かるかい」彼は早口に尋ねた。
This tirade fell lightly on the stranger's ears. He looked as if his thoughts were a thousand miles away, and the organist broke off:
「残念ながらできません」見知らぬ男は大急ぎで心を呼び戻し答えた。「楽器のこともほとんど何も知りません」
"Do you play the organ? Do you understand an organ?" he asked quickly.
「じゃあ、今度、二階の張り出しにたまえ。わたしが演奏に使っいるがらくた箱をお見せしよう。あれが壊れずに礼拝をやり終えることができて幸運だよ。足鍵盤は短すぎて、とっくに寿命を過ぎいるし、送風器はぼろぼろなんだ」
"Alas! I do not play," the stranger said, bringing his mind back with a jerk for the answer, "and understand little about the instrument."
"Well, next time you are here come up into the loft, and I will show you what a chest of rattletraps I have to work with. We are lucky to get through a service without a breakdown; the pedal-board is too short and past its work, and now the bellows are worn-out."
「修理すればいいじゃないですか」と見知らぬ男は言った。「送風器を直すくらい、たいして金はかからないはずですよ」
"Surely you can get that altered," the stranger said; "the bellows shouldn't cost so much to mend."
「これ以上修理がきかないくらいつぎはぎだらけなんだよ。新品を買いたい人には金がない。金がある人は払おうとない。きみが座った席、あれは新しい送風器だって、新しいオルガンだって、必要なら新しい聖堂だって買える男の席なのさ。ブランダマーという名前なんだが――ブランダマー卿。席の後ろをたら彼の大紋章が見えたはずだよ。ところが彼は、天井がわれわれの上に落ちないようにする修理工事の費用を半ペニーだって出そうとない」
"They are patched already past mending. Those who would like to pay for new ones haven't got the money, and those who have the money won't pay. Why, that very stall you sat in belongs to a man who could give us new bellows, and a new organ, and a new church, if we wanted it. Blandamer, that's his name--Lord Blandamer. If you had looked, you could have seen his great coat of arms on the back of the seat; and he won't spend a halfpenny to keep the roofs from falling on our heads."
「ああ、それはとてもお困りでしょうね」彼らは北側扉口までた。外にたとき、彼は思いに沈むように繰り返した。「それはとてもお困りでしょうね。この次お会いたときにもっと詳しく話を聞かください
"Ah," said the stranger, "it seems a very sad case." They had reached the north door, and, as they stepped out, he repeated meditatively: "It seems a very sad case; you must tell me more about it next time we meet."
それを聞いたオルガン奏者はこれを引き時と心得て別れを告げ、川沿いを散歩しようと波止場にむかっ歩きはじめた。見知らぬ男はどことなく外国人を思わせる仕草で帽子を持ち上げ、町のほうへ戻っいった。
The organist took the hint, and wished his companion good-afternoon, turning down towards the wharves for a constitutional on the riverside. The stranger raised his hat with something of foreign courtesy, and walked back into the town.
第七章 ~~~
CHAPTER SEVEN.
ミス・ユーフィミア・ジョウリフは土曜の午後を聖セパルカ大聖堂のドルカス会の活動に充てた。会合は国民女学校の教室で開かれ、献身的な女たちが毎週集まって貧しい人々のために服を作った。カランには少数ながらもぼろ服をまとった紳士諸君がおり、また大勢の中流階級が生活《たつき》にあえいたけれど、幸いなことに大都市におけるような正真正銘の極貧はほとんどられなかった。だから貧しい人々は、ドルカス会の服が最終的に配られてたとき、ときどき品物を点検て、せっかくの生地がこんな裁ち縫いじゃもったいないと嘆いたりた。「ドルカス会が作った外套や服をて、連中は泣いたよ、あんまりひどい仕立てなんでね」とオルガン奏者は言ったが、しかしこれはいわれのない非難である。会には優秀なお針子が大勢たからで、その中でもとりわけ腕のいい一人がミス・ユーフィミア・ジョウリフだった。
Miss Euphemia Joliffe devoted Saturday afternoons to Saint Sepulchre's Dorcas Society. The meetings were held in a class-room of the Girls' National School, and there a band of devoted females gathered week by week to make garments for the poor. If there was in Cullerne some threadbare gentility, and a great deal of middle-class struggling, there was happily little actual poverty, as it is understood in great towns. Thus the poor, to whom the clothes made by the Dorcas Society were ultimately distributed, could sometimes afford to look the gift-horse in the mouth, and to lament that good material had been marred in the making. "They wept," the organist said, "when they showed the coats and garments that Dorcas made, because they were so badly cut;" but this was a libel, for there were many excellent needlewomen in the society, and among the very best was Miss Euphemia Joliffe.
彼女は揺るぎない信念を持った教会の支持者で、機会さえ許したら、目の不自由な人の家を回って聖書を読み聞かたり、教区牧師の活動を補助する世話人になっただろう。しかしベルヴュー・ロッジの切り盛りで彼女の人生は手一杯、教区の仕事などやっいる暇はなく、それゆえドルカス会の会合だけが規則正しく参加のできる唯一の博愛行為だったのである。しかしこの義務の遂行に当たってまさしく彼女は規則正しさの化身であった。風も雨も、雪も熱波も、病気も娯楽も彼女を止めることはできず、彼女は毎週土曜日の午後三時から五時まで、必ず国民学校にその姿をあらわした。
She was a staunch supporter of the church, and, had her circumstances permitted, would have been a Scripture-reader or at least a district visitor. But the world was so much with her, in the shape of domestic necessities at Bellevue Lodge, as to render parish work impossible, and so the Dorcas meeting was the only systematic philanthropy in which she could venture to indulge. But in the discharge of this duty she was regularity personified; neither wind nor rain, snow nor heat, sickness nor amusement, stopped her, and she was to be found each and every Saturday afternoon, from three to five, in the National School.
ドルカス会がこの小柄な老婦人の義務だとたら、それは同時に楽しみでもあった――数少ない彼女の楽しみの一つ、ひょっとしたらその中で最大のものだったかも知れない。彼女が会合を好んだのは、そうした場では自分よりも裕福な隣人たちと対等のような気がたからだ。白痴が葬式や教会の礼拝に参加するのも、これと同じ気持ちからである。そういうときだけは同胞と同じ立場に立っいる感じるのだ。誰も彼も区別なく同じレベルに置かれる。話をする必要もなければ、計算をする必要もない。忠告を与えられることもなければ、決断を下すこともない。神の前では万人が愚か者のごとくあるのである(註 コリント人への前の書から)。
If the Dorcas Society was a duty for the little old lady, it was also a pleasure--one of her few pleasures, and perhaps the greatest. She liked the meetings, because on such occasions she felt herself to be the equal of her more prosperous neighbours. It is the same feeling that makes the half-witted attend funerals and church services. At such times they feel themselves to be for once on an equal footing with their fellow-men: all are reduced to the same level; there are no speeches to be made, no accounts to be added up, no counsels to be given, no decisions to be taken; all are as fools in the sight of God.
ミス・ジョウリフはドルカス会の会合にいちばんいい服をて出席たが、帽子だけは別だった。とっおきのボンネットをかぶるのは安息日だけに限られた最高のおしゃれだったのだ。彼女の衣装箪笥は中身があまりにも切り詰められ、移り変わる季節に合わせて「晴れ着」を変える余裕はなかった。冬の晴れ着は夏の晴れ着として用いられねばならないこともあり、それゆえ彼女はときどき十二月にアルパカを着ることもあれば、この日のようにモスリンの季節だというのに、毛皮の襟巻きをなければならないこともあった。しかし「晴れ着」をいれば、いつも「誰にられても大丈夫」という気分になった。それにこと裁縫にかけては彼女の右に出る者はなかった。
At the Dorcas meeting Miss Joliffe wore her "best things" with the exception only of head-gear, for the wearing of her best bonnet was a crowning grace reserved exclusively for the Sabbath. Her wardrobe was too straightened to allow her "best" to follow the shifting seasons closely. If it was bought as best for winter, it might have to play the same role also in summer, and thus it fell sometimes to her lot to wear alpaca in December, or, as on this day, to be adorned with a fur necklet when the weather asked for muslin. Yet "in her best" she always felt "fit to be seen"; and when it came to cutting out, or sewing, there were none that excelled her.
会員たちのほとんどは彼女に優しいことばをかけて挨拶た。嫉妬や憎しみや悪意が日の出から日の入りまで町中を腕組み歩いいるような場所だったが、それでもミス・ユーフィミアには敵がほとんどなかった。小さな町は大概そうだが、嘘や誹謗や悪口はカランの女たちにとっていちばん大切な活動だった。悪人はないと思っいる、世間知らずで時代遅れのミス・ジョウリフは、最初のうち、そうした歯に衣を着せない噂話で持ちきりという点が、この喜ばしい会合のただ一つの欠点であると思った。しかし昔からずっとつづいたこの悪弊もその後取り除かれることになる。醸造業者の奥さんで、ロンドン仕立てのドレスを、カランで最も流行に敏感なミセス・ブルティールが、ドルカス会の午後は集まったお針子たちのために何かためになる本を読ん聞かせることにしようと提案たのである。ミセス・フリントは、そんな提案をするなんて自分が美声の持ち主だと思っいるからよ、と言ったが、しかし理由はどうあれ、彼女はそういう提案を、誰もそれに反対するものはなかった。そういうわけでミセス・ブルティールはまことに信心深い内容の本を読んだのだが、それがまたずいぶんほろりとせる話で、彼女が涙にかきくれることなく、また彼女のご機嫌取りたちから同情のすすり泣きを誘発することなく、午後が過ぎることはめったになかった。ミス・ジョウリフ自身は、想像上の悲しみにそれほどたやすく感動できないことがあったが、しかしそれは自分の性格に哀れみ深さがかけいるからだと思い、心の中で自分よりも感じやすい他の人々を慶賀た。
Most of the members greeted her with a kind word, for even in a place where envy, hatred and malice walked the streets arm in arm from sunrise to sunset, Miss Euphemia had few enemies. Lying and slandering, and speaking evil of their fellows, formed a staple occupation of the ladies of Cullerne, as of many another small town; and to Miss Joliffe, who was foolish and old-fashioned enough to think evil of no one, it had seemed at first the only drawback of these delightful meetings that a great deal of such highly-spiced talk was to be heard at them. But even this fly was afterwards removed from the amber; for Mrs Bulteel--the brewer's lady--who wore London dresses, and was much the most fashionable person in Cullerne, proposed that some edifying book should be read aloud on Dorcas afternoons to the assembled workers. It was true that Mrs Flint said she only did so because she thought she had a fine voice; but however that might be, she proposed it, and no one cared to run counter to her. So Mrs Bulteel read properly religious stories, of so touching a nature that an afternoon seldom passed without her being herself dissolved in tears, and evoking sympathetic sniffs and sobs from such as wished to stand in her good books. If Miss Joliffe was not herself so easily moved by imaginary sorrow, she set it down to some lack of loving-kindness in her own disposition, and mentally congratulated the others on their superior sensitiveness.
ミス・ジョウリフはドルカス会に出席、ミスタ・シャーノールは川沿いを散歩、ミスタ・ウエストレイは石工たちと袖廊の屋根の上、というわけで、正面玄関のベルが鳴ったとき、ベルヴュー・ロッジにたのはアナスタシア・ジョウリフただ一人だった。叔母が家にいるときは、アナスタシアは「殿方の給仕」をすることも、ベルに応えることも許されなかったが、叔母は不在だし、家のなかには誰もない。しようがなく彼女は観音開きになった大きな玄関ドアの一方を開け、半円形の外の階段に一人の紳士が立っいるのを見いだした。その男が紳士であることは彼女には一目で分かった。彼女にはそんな役に立たない違いを識別する「才能」があったのだ。もっともカランにはその手の人間が多くはないので、家の近所で彼女の才能を鍛えるというわけにはいかなかったけれど。実は彼はテノールを歌ったあの見知らぬ男だった。彼女は女性の持つ鋭い観察眼で、男の外見についてオルガン奏者や聖歌隊や教会事務員が一時間かけ知ったことを一瞬のうちに見て取った。いや、それだけではない。彼女は男の服装が上物であることも見逃さなかった。男は装飾品をまったく身につけなかった。指輪もネクタイピンもつけず、懐中時計の鎖さえも革製でしかなかった。服の色はほとんど黒といってもいいくらい濃い灰色だったが、生地は上等で、仕立ても最高のものだとミス・アナスタシア・ジョウリフは思った。ベルに応えいくとき、彼女は「ノーサンガー・アベイ」(註 ジェイン・オースチンの小説)にしおり代わりの鉛筆をはさんだのだが、見知らぬ男が彼女の前に立ったとき、彼女はヒロインの恋人役、ヘンリー・ティルニーがあらわれたのではないかと思った。そして彼が唇を開こうとするとき、彼女はキャサリン・モーランドのように身構えて、重大な知らせが発せられるのを待ち受けたのである。しかしそこから発せられたのは少しも重大なことではなかった。空き部屋の有無という、彼女が半ば期待た質問ですらなかった。
Miss Joliffe was at the Dorcas meeting, Mr Sharnall was walking by the riverside, Mr Westray was with the masons on the roof of the transept; only Anastasia Joliffe was at Bellevue Lodge when the front-door-bell rang. When her aunt was at home, Anastasia was not allowed to "wait on the gentlemen," nor to answer the bell; but her aunt being absent, and there being no one else in the house, she duly opened one leaf of the great front-door, and found a gentleman standing on the semicircular flight of steps outside. That he was a gentleman she knew at a glance, for she had a _flair_ for such useless distinctions, though the genus was not sufficiently common at Cullerne to allow her much practice in its identification near home. It was, in fact, the stranger of the tenor voice, and such is the quickness of woman's wit, that she learnt in a moment as much concerning his outward appearance as the organist and the choir-men and the clerk had learnt in an hour; and more besides, for she saw that he was well dressed. There was about him a complete absence of personal adornment. He wore no rings and no scarf-pin, even his watch-chain was only of leather. His clothes were of so dark a grey as to be almost black, but Miss Anastasia Joliffe knew that the cloth was good, and the cut of the best. She had thrust a pencil into the pages of "Northanger Abbey" to keep the place while she answered the bell, and as the stranger stood before her, it seemed to her he might be a Henry Tilney, and she was prepared, like a Catherine Morland, for some momentous announcement when he opened his lips. Yet there came nothing very weighty from them; he did not even inquire for lodgings, as she half hoped that he would.
「聖堂工事の監督をいる建築家はここに下宿ますか。ミスタ・ウエストレイはご在宅でしょうか」それが彼の言ったすべてだった。
"Does the architect in charge of the works at the church lodge here? Is Mr Westray at home?" was all he said.
「ここに住んでいらっしゃいますわ」と彼女は答えた。「でも今はお出かけです。六時までお戻りにならないと思います。お会いなりたいのでしたら、たぶん聖堂にいる思うんですけど」
"He does live here," she answered, "but is out just now, and we do not expect him back till six. I think you will probably find him at the church if you desire to see him."
「今聖堂からたところです。でも見つかりませんでしたよ」
"I have just come from the minster, but could see nothing of him there."
建築家に会えずベルヴュー・ロッジまでわざわざ歩く羽目にあったのは、きっとおざなりにしか建築家を探そうとなかったからだろう。当然の報いだった。手間暇惜しまずオルガン奏者か教会事務員に訊いていれば、ミスタ・ウエストレイの居場所はすぐに分かったはずである。
It served the stranger right that he should have missed the architect, and been put to the trouble of walking as far as Bellevue Lodge, for his inquiries must have been very perfunctory. If he had taken the trouble to ask either organist or clerk, he would have learnt at once where Mr Westray was.
「メモを書いてもいいでしょうか。紙を一枚もらえれば、伝言を残しいきたいのですが」
"I wonder if you would allow me to write a note. If you could give me a sheet of paper I should be glad to leave a message for him."
アナスタシアは頭のてっぺんからつま先まで、早撮り写真のようにすばやく相手を一瞥た。「乞食」はカランのご婦人たちにとって常に嫌悪べき対象で、そうした怪しい男に対して持つべき恐れは、叔母によってアナスタシア・ジョウリフにも植え付けられてた。さらに男の下宿人が家にて、もしものことがあった場合、取っ組み合ってもらえるというときでなければ、相手がどんな口実を設けようと、決して見知らぬ人間を家に入れてはならないというのが、昔からこの家にずっとつづく規則だった。しかしちらりとただけで、最初の判断を確認するには充分だった――この方は間違いなく紳士だわ。紳士乞食なんてものはありない。そこで彼女は「ええ、もちろん」と答えて、彼をミスタ・シャーノールの部屋に案内た。そこが一階にあったからである。
Anastasia gave him a glance from head to foot, rapid as an instantaneous exposure. "Tramps" were a permanent bugbear to the ladies of Cullerne, and a proper dread of such miscreants had been instilled into Anastasia Joliffe by her aunt. It was, moreover, a standing rule of the house that no strange men were to be admitted on any pretence, unless there was some man-lodger at home, to grapple with them if occasion arose. But the glance was sufficient to confirm her first verdict--he _was_ a gentleman; there surely could not be such things as gentlemen-tramps. So she answered "Oh, certainly," and showed him into Mr Sharnall's room, because that was on the ground-floor.
訪問者は部屋の中をすばやく見回した。もしも彼が以前この家にたことがあったなら、アナスタシアは彼が記憶にある何かを確認しようといる思っただろう。しかしオープン・ピアノといつも通り散らかった楽譜と手書きの原稿以外、見るべきものなど何もなかった。
The visitor gave a quick look round the room. If he had ever been in the house before, Anastasia would have thought he was trying to identify something that he remembered; but there was little to be seen except an open piano, and the usual litter of music-books and manuscript paper.
「ありがとう。ここで書いてもかまいませんか。ここがミスタ・ウエストレイの部屋ですか」
"Thank you," he said; "can I write here? Is this Mr Westray's room?"
「いいえ。もう一人の方がここに下宿いるんです。でもこの部屋でメモをお書きになればいいわ。外出中ですし、どっちみち気にないでしょうから。彼はミスタ・ウエストレイのお友達です」
"No, another gentleman lodges here, but you can use this room to write in. He is out, and would not mind in any case; he is a friend of Mr Westray."
できればミスタ・ウエストレイの部屋で書きたいのですよ。こちらの紳士とは関係がありませんし、戻ってわたしが彼の部屋にたら気まずいでしょう」
"I had rather write in Mr Westray's room if I may. You see I have nothing to do with this other gentleman, and it might be awkward if he came in and found me in his apartment."
今彼らがいる部屋がウエストレイの部屋ではないと知り、見知らぬ男はどういうわけかほっとたようにアナスタシアには思えた。どんなに当惑たような振りをても、その態度にはかすかな、なんとも言えない安堵感が感じられた。もしかたらこの人はミスタ・ウエストレイの大の親友で、部屋の中が散らかって、だらしないのを残念に思ったのじゃないかしら。ミスタ・シャーノールの部屋は本当にひどい有様だもの。だから自分の思い違いを知らされて嬉しいのだわ、と彼女は思った。
It seemed to Anastasia that the information that the room in which they stood was not Mr Westray's had in some way or other removed an anxiety from the stranger's mind. There was a faint and indefinable indication of relief in his manner, however much he professed to be embarrassed at the discovery. It might have been, she thought, that he was a great friend of Mr Westray, and had been sorry to think that his room should be littered and untidy as Mr Sharnall's certainly was, and so was glad when he found out his mistake.
「ミスタ・ウエストレイの部屋はいちばん上の階なんです」彼女は弁解するように言った。
"Mr Westray's room is at the top of the house," she said deprecatingly.
「階段を上がるくらい、なんでもありませんよ」と彼は答えた。
"It is no trouble to me, I assure you, to go up," he answered.
アナスタシアはまたもや一瞬戸惑った。紳士乞食はないとしても、紳士強盗はいるかも知れない。彼女は慌ててミスタ・ウエストレイの所持品リストを頭に思い浮かべたが、犯罪を誘発そうなものは何もなかった。それでも彼女は、自分一人しか家にないときに、いちばん上の階へ見知らぬ男を案内するのは気が引けた。そんなことを頼むなんて作法をはずれいるわ。やっぱり紳士じゃないのかも知れない。さもなきゃ自分の要求がどんなに礼を失しているか、分かるはずだもの。それとも何か特別な理由があって、ミスタ・ウエストレイの部屋をたいのかしら。 ~~~ 見知らぬ男は相手の戸惑いに気がつき、彼女が考えいることを容易に読み取った。
Anastasia hesitated again for an instant. If there were no gentlemen-tramps, perhaps there were gentlemen-burglars, and she hastily made a mental inventory of Mr Westray's belongings, but could think of nothing among them likely to act as an incentive to crime. Still she would not venture to show a strange man to the top of the house, when there was no one at home but herself. The stranger ought not to have asked her. He could not be a gentleman after all, or he would have seen how irregular was such a request, unless he had indeed some particular motive for wishing to see Mr Westray's room.
「申し訳ありません。あなたとお話しいただいいる人間が誰か、名乗りをあげるべきでしたね。わたしはブランダマー卿と申します。聖堂修復の件で、ミスタ・ウエストレイに二言三言伝えたいことがあるんです。これがわたしの名刺です」
The stranger perceived her hesitation, and read her thoughts easily enough.
恐らく町でアナスタシア・ジョウリフくらい平然とこの知らせを受け止めた女はないだろう。祖父が死んで以来、新しいブランダマー卿は絶えず地元の人の噂と憶測のタネとなった。彼はこの地方の実力者で、町と周囲の田園地帯をことごとく所有た。フォーディングの豪邸は、晴れた日なら、聖堂の塔から望み見ることができた。彼は才能豊かな、りりしい顔立ちの人物だという評判で、四十は超えておらず未婚とのことだった。しかし成人てからその姿をた者はなく、二十年もカランから遠ざかっいる言われてた。
"I beg your pardon," he said. "I ought, of course, to have explained who it is who has the honour of speaking to you. I am Lord Blandamer, and wish to write a few words to Mr Westray on questions connected with the restoration of the church. Here is my card."
話によると、彼は若いとき祖父と原因不明の喧嘩を、家を追い出された。父も母も彼が赤ん坊のときに水死たため、誰も彼の肩を持つ者はなかったのだ。四分の一世紀のあいだ、彼は外国を放浪た。フランスとドイツ、ロシアとギリシャ、イタリアとスペイン。彼は東洋を訪ね、エジプトで戦い、南アメリカで封鎖をくぐり、南アフリカで値のつけられないようなダイヤを発見たと信じられている。ヒンドゥー教の行者の恐るべき苦行を経験、アトス山(註 ギリシャ正教会の根拠地)の僧侶とともに断食をた。トラップ大修道院の無言の行に耐え、噂によるとイスラム教主教がみずからブランダマー卿の頭に緑のターバンを巻いたという。射撃、狩猟、釣り、拳闘、歌ができ、楽器は何でもこなした。どこの国のことばも母国語のように操った。彼こそはいまだかつてこの世に生まれた人間の中で最高の学識と美貌――そしてある人がほのめかすには――最も邪悪な心を持つということであったのだが、誰も彼をたことはなかった。謎めいた、見知らぬ貴人と同じ屋根の下で顔をつきあわせるというのは、当然ながらアナスタシアにとってロマンスの絶好のきっかけであったはずである。しかし、彼女はそういう状況にふさわしいためらいも、おののき感じず、気が遠くなることもなかった。
There was probably no lady in the town that would have received this information with as great composure as did Anastasia Joliffe. Since the death of his grandfather, the new Lord Blandamer had been a constant theme of local gossip and surmise. He was a territorial magnate, he owned the whole of the town, and the whole of the surrounding country. His stately house of Fording could be seen on a clear day from the minster tower. He was reputed to be a man of great talents and distinguished appearance; he was not more than forty, and he was unmarried. Yet no one had seen him since he came to man's estate; it was said he had not been in Cullerne for twenty years.
There was a tale of some mysterious quarrel with his grandfather, which had banished the young man from his home, and there had been no one to take his part, for both his father and mother were drowned when he was a baby. For a quarter of a century he had been a wanderer abroad: in France and Germany, in Russia and Greece, in Italy and Spain. He was believed to have visited the East, to have fought in Egypt, to have run blockades in South America, to have found priceless diamonds in South Africa. He had suffered the awful penances of the Fakirs, he had fasted with the monks of Mount Athos; he had endured the silence of La Trappe; men said that the Sheik-ul-Islam had himself bound the green turban round Lord Blandamer's head. He could shoot, he could hunt, he could fish, he could fight, he could sing, he could play all instruments; he could speak all languages as fluently as his own; he was the very wisest and the very handsomest, and--some hinted--the very wickedest man that ever lived, yet no one had ever seen him. Here was indeed a conjunction of romance for Anastasia, to find so mysterious and distinguished a stranger face to face with her alone under the same roof; yet she showed none of those hesitations, tremblings, or faintings that the situation certainly demanded.
彼女の父親マーチン・ジョウリフは死ぬまでその美貌を保ち、自分でもそのことをよく知った。若いときは整った目鼻立ちを誇りに、歳を取ってからは身だしなみに注意を払った。暮らしぶりがどん底に落ちこんだときでさえ、彼は仕立てのいい服を手に入れようとた。いつも最新流行の服というわけにはいかなかったが、それらは背の高い、姿勢のしゃんとた彼にはよく似合った。人は彼のことを「紳士ジョウリフ」と呼ん笑ったが、カランでしばしば聞かれる悪口と違って、そこにはそれほど嫌味がこめられてなかったようだ。むしろ農夫の息子がどこであんな物腰を身につけたのかと不思議がられた。マーチン自身にとっては貴族的な態度は気取りというより義務だった。彼の立場がそれを要求するのだ。なぜなら彼は自分のことを、権利を剥奪れたブランダマー家の人間と思いこんでたからである。
Martin Joliffe, her father, had been a handsome man all his life, and had known it. In youth he prided himself on his good looks, and in old age he was careful of his personal appearance. Even when his circumstances were at their worst he had managed to obtain well-cut clothes. They were not always of the newest, but they sat well on his tall and upright figure; "Gentleman Joliffe" people called him, and laughed, though perhaps something less ill-naturedly than was often the case in Cullerne, and wondered whence a farmer's son had gotten such manners. To Martin himself an aristocratic bearing was less an affectation than a duty; his position demanded it, for he was in his own eyes a Blandamer kept out of his rights.
グローヴ家のミス・ハンターが、父親のハンター大佐から、身分違いもはなはだしい、あんな男と結婚たら勘当だ、と固く言い渡されてたにもかかわらず、彼と駆け落ちたのは、四十五才になっても彼の男っぷりがよかったからである。実は彼女は父親の不興に長く耐えることなく、最初の子供を産んだときに亡くなっしまった。この悲しい結末さえ大佐の心を和らげることはできなかった。小説にられる前例をことごとく覆し、大佐は幼い孫娘に少しも関心を示さず、あまりの世間体の悪さにカランから引っ越ししまったのである。マーチンもまた親としての義務を真剣に受け止めるような男ではなく、子供の養育はミス・ジョウリフに任された。彼女の苦労が一つ増えたわけだが、しかしそれ以上に彼女は喜びを感じた。マーチンは娘をアナスタシアと名付けたことで充分に自分の責任を果たしたと考えた。この名前はディブレット貴族名鑑によると、ブランダマー家の女性によって代々引き継がれてた名前なのだそうだ。このひときわ輝かしい愛の証拠を与えたあと、彼はまた家系調査のため断続的につづく放浪の旅に出かけ、五年間カランに戻っなかった。
It was his good appearance, even at five-and-forty, which induced Miss Hunter of the Grove to run away with him, though Colonel Hunter had promised to disown her if she ever married so far beneath her. She did not, it is true, live long to endure her father's displeasure, but died in giving birth to her first child. Even this sad result had failed to melt the Colonel's heart. Contrary to all precedents of fiction, he would have nothing to do with his little granddaughter, and sought refuge from so untenable a position in removing from Cullerne. Nor was Martin himself a man to feel a parent's obligations too acutely; so the child was left to be brought up by Miss Joliffe, and to become an addition to her cares, but much more to her joys. Martin Joliffe considered that he had amply fulfilled his responsibilities in christening his daughter Anastasia, a name which Debrett shows to have been borne for generations by ladies of the Blandamer family; and, having given so striking a proof of affection, he started off on one of those periodic wanderings which were connected with his genealogical researches, and was not seen again in Cullerne for a lustre.
その後何年もマーチンは娘をほったらかし、ときどきカランに戻ってはたものの、いつも雲形紋章に対する自分の権利を確立することに熱中、アナスタシアの教育と扶養はすっかり妹にまかせて満足た。彼がはじめて親としての権威を振りかざしたのは、娘が十五になったときだった。その頃久しぶりに家に戻った彼は、妹のミス・ジョウリフにむかって、姪の教育がけしからぬほどなおざりにれていると指摘、このような嘆かわしい状態はすぐさま改められなければならないと言った。ミス・ジョウリフは悲しそうに自分の至らなさを認め、自分の怠慢を許して欲しいとマーチンに嘆願た。彼女は、下宿の管理や、自分とアナスタシアの生計を立てる必要が、教育に宛てるべき時間を甚だしく減らしいるとか、手元不如意のために教師を雇って自分のあまりにも限られた教育を補うことができないのだ、などと言い訳しようとは夢にも思わなかった。実際、彼女がアナスタシアに教えられることといったら、読み書き、算数、地理を少々、「マグノール先生の質問集」からた微々たる知識、見事な針使い、詩と小説に対するつきることのない愛、カランでは奇特というべき隣人への思いやり、そしてブランダマー家最上のしきたりとは残念ながら相容れぬ神への畏れ、せいぜいがこの程度であったのである。
For many years afterwards Martin showed but little interest in the child. He came back to Cullerne at intervals; but was always absorbed in his efforts to establish a right to the nebuly coat, and content to leave the education and support of Anastasia entirely to his sister. It was not till his daughter was fifteen that he exercised any paternal authority; but, on his return from a long absence about that period, he pointed out to Miss Joliffe, senior, that she had shamefully neglected her niece's education, and that so lamentable a state of affairs must be remedied at once. Miss Joliffe most sorrowfully admitted her shortcomings, and asked Martin's forgiveness for her remissness. Nor did it ever occur to her to plead in excuse that the duties of a lodging-house, and the necessity of providing sustenance for herself and Anastasia, made serious inroads on the time that ought, no doubt, to have been devoted to education; or that the lack of means prevented her from engaging teachers to supplement her own too limited instruction. She had, in fact, been able to impart to Anastasia little except reading, writing and arithmetic, some geography, a slight knowledge of Miss Magnall's questions, a wonderful proficiency with the needle, an unquenchable love of poetry and fiction, a charity for her neighbours which was rare enough in Cullerne, and a fear of God which was sadly inconsistent with the best Blandamer traditions.
ブランダマー家にふさわしい育て方をない、とマーチンは言った。令嬢アナスタシアとなったときに、どうしてその任に耐えることができるというのか。フランス語を勉強なければならない。ミス・ジョウリフが教えたような初歩ではなくて。彼は妹の真似をて「ドゥ、デラ、デラポトロフ、デイ」と言っ笑い、彼女のしなびた頬を真赤に、テーブルの下で叔母の手を握ったアナスタシアを泣かせた。そんなフランス語じゃなくて、上流階級で通用するようなちゃんとたやつだ。それから音楽、これは必須科目だ。ミス・ジョウリフは、家事と痛風が共謀て節くれ立った指からしなやかさを奪うまで、自分が低音部を受け持ってアナスタシアとやさしいピアノの二重奏をたことを恥ずかしさとともに思い出し、また顔を赤らめた。姪と二重奏するのは大きな喜びだったが、しかしもちろんおよそ下手くそなものでしかなかったろうし、自分が子供のときに弾いた曲だからおそろしく流行遅れだったに違いない。しかもピアノもウィドコウムの客間にあった、あの同じピアノだった。
The girl was not being brought up as became a Blandamer, Martin had said; how was she to fill her position when she became the Honourable Anastasia? She must learn French, not such rudiments as Miss Joliffe had taught her, and he travestied his sister's "Doo, dellah, derlapostrof, day" with a laugh that flushed her withered cheeks with crimson, and made Anastasia cry as she held her aunt's hand under the table; not _that_ kind of French, but something that would really pass muster in society. And music, she _must_ study that; and Miss Joliffe blushed again as she thought very humbly of some elementary duets in which she had played a bass for Anastasia till household work and gout conspired to rob her knotty fingers of all pliancy. It had been a great pleasure to her, the playing of these duets with her niece; but they must, of course, be very poor things, and quite out of date now, for she had played them when she was a child herself, and on the very same piano in the parlour at Wydcombe.
そういうわけで彼女はマーチンが改善計画を提示するあいだ熱心に耳を傾けた。この計画とはアナスタシアを州都カリスベリにあるミセス・ハワードの寄宿学校に送ることに他ならなかった。この目論見を聞いて妹は息をのんだ。ミセス・ハワードの学校といえば、名門の教養学校であり、カランのご婦人方の中で娘をそこに送っいるのはミセス・ブルティールだけだったのだ。しかしマーチンの高潔な寛容は留まるところを知らなかった。「そうと決まれば善は急げだ。やるべきことはさっさとやっしまおう」彼はポケットから粗布の袋を取り出し、テーブルの上にソヴリン金貨の小山を築いて議論に決着をつけた。兄がどうやってそんな富をたのかというミス・ジョウリフの驚きは、彼の度量の大きさに対する感嘆の念によってかき消された。この富のほんの一部でベルヴュー・ロッジの逼迫た財政状態が緩和れるのに、と束の間彼女が思ったとしても、彼女はそんなぼやきを圧し殺し、天が与えたアナスタシアの教育費用に熱烈な感謝を捧げた。マーチンはテーブルのソヴリン金貨を数えた。前払いてアナスタシアの印象をよくたほうがいいと言われて、ミス・ジョウリフは賛成、大いに胸をなで下ろした。彼女は学期終了前にマーチンがまた旅にて、支払いを彼女に押しつけるのではないかとびくびくたのだ。
So she listened with attention while Martin revealed his scheme of reform, and this was nothing less than the sending of Anastasia to Mrs Howard's boarding-school at the county town of Carisbury. The project took away his sister's breath, for Mrs Howard's was a finishing school of repute, to which only Mrs Bulteel among Cullerne ladies could afford to send her daughters. But Martin's high-minded generosity knew no limits. "It was no use making two bites at a cherry; what had to be done had better be done quickly." And he clinched the argument by taking a canvas bag from his pocket, and pouring out a little heap of sovereigns on to the table. Miss Joliffe's wonder as to how her brother had become possessed of such wealth was lost in admiration of his magnanimity, and if for an instant she thought wistfully of the relief that a small portion of these riches would bring to the poverty-stricken menage at Bellevue Lodge, she silenced such murmurings in a burst of gratitude for the means of improvement that Providence had vouchsafed to Anastasia. Martin counted out the sovereigns on the table; it was better to pay in advance, and so make an impression in Anastasia's favour, and to this Miss Joliffe agreed with much relief, for she had feared that before the end of the term Martin would be off on his travels again, and that she herself would be left to pay.
こうしてアナスタシアはカリスベリに行った。ミス・ジョウリフはみずからに課した規則を破って、幾つもの小さな借金を背負いこんだ。というのは当時持ったような貧相な支度で姪を学校にやりたくはなかったし、かといってよりよい支度を買うには、手持ちの金がなかったのだ。アナスタシアはカリスベリで半期を二回過ごした。音楽の腕前は大いに上がり、退屈で気のない練習をさんざん積んだあげく、タールベルクの「埴生の宿」による変奏曲をつっかえながら弾くことができるようになった。しかしフランス語は本格的なパリのアクセントを習得できず、ときには習いはじめの頃の「ドゥ、デラ、デラポトロフ、デイ」に逆戻りすることもあった。もっともそうした欠点が後に深刻な不都合を招いたことはなかったようだけれど。教養を身につける以外にも、彼女は中流上層に属する三十人の子女と交わる特権を楽しみ、善悪を知る木から、それまでは気づきもなかった果実を食べた。しかし第二学期の終わりに彼女はこれらの恵まれた機会を放棄ざるをなかった。マーチンが娘の授業料を永続的に準備することなくカランを離れ、ミセス・ハワードの学校案内には重力の法則のごとき厳然たる規則があったのだ。すなわち、前学期の学費を納めてない場合は、いかなる生徒も学校に戻ることを許可ずという規則が。
So Anastasia went to Carisbury, and Miss Joliffe broke her own rules, and herself incurred a number of small debts because she could not bear to think of her niece going to school with so meagre an equipment as she then possessed, and yet had no ready money to buy better. Anastasia remained for two half-years at Carisbury. She made such progress with her music that after much wearisome and lifeless practising she could stumble through Thalberg's variations on the air of "Home, Sweet Home"; but in French she never acquired the true Parisian accent, and would revert at times to the "Doo, dellah, derlapostrof, day," of her earlier teaching, though there is no record that these shortcomings were ever a serious drawback to her in after-life. Besides such opportunities of improvement, she enjoyed the privilege of association with thirty girls of the upper middle-classes, and ate of the tree of knowledge of good and evil, the fruits of which had hitherto escaped her notice. At the end of her second term, however, she was forced to forego these advantages, for Martin had left Cullerne without making any permanent provision for his daughter's schooling; and there was in Mrs Howard's prospectus a law, inexorable as that of gravity, that no pupil shall be permitted to return to the academy whose account for the previous term remains unsettled.
アナスタシアの学校生活はこれをもって終了た。カリスベリの空気は彼女の健康によくないなどといった説明がなされたが、彼女がその本当の理由を知ったのは、それからほぼ二年後のことで、そのころにはミス・ジョウリフの勤勉と禁欲が、ミセス・ハワードへのマーチンの負債をほぼ払い終えた。娘のほうはカランにられることが嬉しかった。彼女はミス・ジョウリフを深く慕ったからだ。しかし経験という点では彼女はずっと大人び戻った。視野は広がり、人生をいっそう深く見通すことができるようになりはじめた。こうした広がりを持った考え方は好ましい実も結んだが、好ましくない実も結んだ。父親の性格をより公正に評価するようになったからである。父親がまた戻ったとき、彼女はそのわがままや、妹の愛情につけこむやり方に我慢がならなかった。
Thus Anastasia's schooling came to an end. There was some excuse put forward that the air of Carisbury did not agree with her; and she never knew the real reason till nearly two years later, by which time Miss Joliffe's industry and self-denial had discharged the greater part of Martin's obligation to Mrs Howard. The girl was glad to remain at Cullerne, for she was deeply attached to Miss Joliffe; but she came back much older in experience; her horizon had widened, and she was beginning to take a more perspective view of life. These enlarged ideas bore fruit both pleasant and unpleasant, for she was led to form a juster estimate of her father's character, and when he next returned she found it difficult to tolerate his selfishness and abuse of his sister's devotion.
このような事態はミス・ジョウリフを大いに悲しまた。彼女は姪を愛し、崇拝にもた気持ちすら持ったのだが、同時に彼女は非常に良心的で、子供は何よりもまず親を敬うべきだということを忘れなかった。そういうわけで彼女は、アナスタシアがマーチンより自分に愛着を覚えいることを悲しまなければならないと考えたのだ。姪が誰よりも自分を愛しいるということに、しかるべき不満を抱けないことがあったとしても、そんな自分の心の弱さを償うために彼女は姪といっしょにいる機会を犠牲に、チャンスがあれば彼女を父親と二人きりで過ごさせようと努力た。真の基盤がないところに愛情を生じさせようとする努力が永遠に不毛であるように、それは無駄な努力に終わった。マーチンは娘と一緒にいることにうんざりた。彼は一人でいることを好み、彼女を料理と掃除と繕いする機械としかみなしなかったのだ。アナスタシアはそんな態度に憤慨、おまけに父親の聖書たるぼろぼろに破れた貴族名鑑とか、口を開けばいつも飛び出す家系調査だの、雲形紋章にまつわる専門用語だのには何の関心も持てなかった。その後、彼が最後の帰還を遂げたとき、彼女は義務感から模範的な辛抱強さで身の回りの世話や看護を、親への敬愛がすることをうながす、ありとあらゆる親孝行をやっのけた。父の死は安堵ではなく悲しみをもたらしたのだと信じこもうと、それがうまくいって叔母はその点についてはなんらの疑いも持たなかった。
That this should be so was a cause of great grief to Miss Joliffe. Though she herself felt for her niece a love which had in it something of adoration, she was at the same time conscientious enough to remember that a child's first duty should be towards its parents. Thus she forced herself to lament that Anastasia should be more closely attached to her than to Martin, and if there were times when she could not feel properly dissatisfied that she possessed the first place in her niece's affections, she tried to atone for this frailty by sacrificing opportunities of being with the girl herself, and using every opportunity of bringing her into her father's company. It was a fruitless endeavour, as every endeavour to cultivate affection where no real basis for it exists, must eternally remain fruitless. Martin was wearied by his daughter's society, for he preferred to be alone, and set no store by her except as a cooking, house-cleaning, and clothes-mending machine; and Anastasia resented this attitude, and could find, moreover, no interest in the torn peerage which was her father's Bible, or in the genealogical research and jargon about the nebuly coat which formed the staple of his conversation. Later on, when he came back for the last time, her sense of duty enabled her to tend and nurse him with exemplary patience, and to fulfil all those offices of affection which even the most tender filial devotion could have suggested. She tried to believe that his death brought her sorrow and not relief, and succeeded so well that her aunt had no doubts at all upon the subject.
マーチン・ジョウリフの病気と死はアナスタシアを医者や聖職者と接触、それによって彼女は人生経験をさらに深めた。ブランダマー卿の名乗りを聞いても、その衝撃に耐え、ほんの少し顔を赤らめるだけで目に見えるような当惑のしるしを一つも見せなかったのは、疑いもなくこうした修練とミセス・ハワードの学校が与えた上流階級との付き合いのおかげだった。
Martin Joliffe's illness and death had added to Anastasia's experience of life by bringing her into contact with doctors and clergymen; and it was no doubt this training, and the association with the superior classes afforded by Mrs Howard's academy, that enabled her to stand the shock of Lord Blandamer's announcement without giving any more perceptible token of embarrassment than a very slight blush.
「あら、もちろんミスタ・ウエストレイの部屋でお書きになって結構ですわ。ご案内ましょう」
"Oh, of course there is no objection," she said, "to your writing in Mr Westray's room. I will show you the way to it."
彼女は部屋へ案内書くための道具を用意すると、ミスタ・ウエストレイの椅子に心地よく腰かける卿を残して部屋をた。出しなに後ろ手でドアを閉めようとたとき、何かが彼女を振り返らた――もしかたらそれは単なる若い女の気まぐれだったのかも知れないし、あるいは見つめられているという意識がときどき人間に及ぼす曰く言い難い魔力のせいだったのかも知れない。とにかく後ろをたとき、彼女はブランダマー卿と目がかち合い、彼女は自分の愚かしさに腹を立てドアをぴしゃりと閉めた。
She accompanied him to the room, and having provided writing materials, left him comfortably ensconced in Mr Westray's chair. As she pulled the door to behind her in going out, something prompted her to look round--perhaps it was merely a girl's light fancy, perhaps it was that indefinite fascination which the consciousness that we are being looked at sometimes exercises over us; but as she looked back her eyes met those of Lord Blandamer, and she shut the door sharply, being annoyed at her own foolishness.
She went back to the kitchen, for the kitchen of the Hand of God was so large that Miss Joliffe and Anastasia used part of it for their sitting-room, took the pencil out of "Northanger Abbey," and tried to transport herself to Bath. Five minutes ago she had been in the Grand Pump Room herself, and knew exactly where Mrs Allen and Isabella Thorpe and Edward Morland were sitting; where Catherine was standing, and what John Thorpe was saying to her when Tilney walked up. But alas! Anastasia found no re-admission; the lights were put out, the Pump Room was in darkness. A sad change to have happened in five minutes; but no doubt the charmed circle had dispersed in a huff on finding that they no longer occupied the first place in Miss Anastasia Joliffe's interest. And, indeed, she missed them the less because she had discovered that she herself possessed a wonderful talent for romance, and had already begun the first chapter of a thrilling story.
彼女は台所に戻った。神の手の台所はあまりにも広かったので、ミス・ジョウリフとアナスタシアはその一部を居間の代わりに使った。彼女は「ノーサンガー・アベイ」から鉛筆を抜き取り、自分の身をその舞台であるバースに送りこもうとた。五分前は彼女も鉱泉室にて、ミセス・アレンやイザベラ・ソープやエドワード・モーランドがどこに座っいるか、そしてキャサリンがどこに立って、ティルニーが歩み寄ったときジョン・ソープが彼女に何を話したのか、正確に知ったのである。ところがどうだろう!アナスタシアは二度とそこに入ることができなかった。灯りは消え、鉱泉室は真暗だった。五分間のあいだに悲しむべき変化が起きたのだ。入会の難しいこの団体は、もはやミス・アナスタシア・ジョウリフの興味の中心ではないことを知り、憤然として解散しまったのである。彼らがなくなっても、もちろん彼女は少しも寂しくなかった。彼女は自分に素晴らしい恋愛小説の才能があることを見いだしてたし、すでに胸をときめかす物語の第一章を書きはじめたからである。
Nearly half an hour passed before her aunt returned, and in the interval Miss Austen's knights and dames had retired still farther into the background, and Miss Anastasia's hero had entirely monopolised the stage. It was twenty minutes past five when Miss Joliffe, senior, returned from the Dorcas meeting; "precisely twenty minutes past five," as she remarked many times subsequently, with that factitious importance which the ordinary mind attaches to the exact moment of any epoch-making event.
それからほぼ半時間後に叔母が帰ったのだが、そのあいだにミス・オースチンの騎士たちや貴婦人たちはいっそう背景に引っこみ、ミス・アナスタシアの主人公が完全に舞台を独占た。年上のほうのミス・ジョウリフがドルカス会から戻ったのは、五時二十分だった。「かっきり五時二十分過ぎでしたわ」その後彼女は幾度となくそう言った。画期的な事件があると凡人はそれが起きた正確な時間に不自然なくらい重要性を付加するものである。
"Is the water boiling, my dear?" she asked, sitting down at the kitchen table. "I should like to have tea to-day before the gentlemen come in, if you do not mind. The weather is quite oppressive, and the schoolroom was very close because we only had one window open. Poor Mrs Bulteel is so subject to take cold from draughts, and I very nearly fell asleep while she was reading."
「お湯は沸いいるかしら」台所のテーブルに座りながら彼女は尋ねた。「よかったら今日は、殿方たちが戻る前にお茶を一杯いただきたいわ。お天気はすごくむっといるし、教室は窓が一つしか開いなかったからとっても暑苦しくって。お気の毒にミセス・ブルティールは風が吹きこむとすぐ風邪をひくのよ。彼女の朗読の最中に眠りそうになったわ」
"I will get tea at once," Anastasia said; and then added, in a tone of fine unconcern: "There is a gentleman waiting upstairs to see Mr Westray."
「すぐ用意する」とアナスタシアは言い、巧みに無関心を装ってこう付け加えた。「紳士の方が上でミスタ・ウエストレイを待っいるわよ」 ~~~ 「あなた」ミス・ジョウリフが咎めるように叫んだ。「私がないときにどうして人を家に入れたの。怪しげな人が大勢うろついてすごく危ないのよ。ミスタ・ウエストレイの記念インクスタンドや、大金で買い取りの申しこみあった花の絵があるじゃない。貴重な絵はよく額から切り取られてしまうの。泥棒なんて何をしでかす分かりゃないんだから」
"My dear," Miss Joliffe exclaimed deprecatingly, "how could you let anyone in when I was not at home? It is exceedingly dangerous with so many doubtful characters about. There is Mr Westray's presentation inkstand, and the flower-picture for which I have been offered so much money. Valuable paintings are often cut out of their frames; one never has an idea what thieves may do."
アナスタシアの唇には微かな笑みが浮かんた。
There was the faintest trace of a smile about Anastasia's lips.
「心配なくても大丈夫よ、フェミー叔母さん。紳士の方だってことは間違いないんですもの。これがその人の名刺よ。ほら!」彼女はただならぬ秘密を帯びた一片の白い厚紙をミス・ジョウリフに手渡し、叔母が眼鏡をかけてそれを読む様子をた。
"I do not think we need trouble about that, dear Aunt Phemie, because I am sure he is a gentleman. Here is his card. Look!" She handed Miss Joliffe the insignificant little piece of white cardboard that held so momentous a secret, and watched her aunt put on her spectacles to read it.
ミス・ジョウリフは名刺に焦点を合わせた。「ブランダマー卿」と、たった二つのことばが実に平々凡々とた字で書かれているだけだったが、それは魔法のような効果をあらわした。疑心暗鬼はたちどころに消え輝くばかりの驚きが顔に広がった。そのさまは、ローマ帝国軍旗の幻をたコンスタンティン大帝もかくやと思われた。彼女は徹頭徹尾浮き世離れた女で、現世の何ものにも価値を置かず、ひたすら来世の到来を待ち望み、彼女よりも大きな世俗的財産を持つ者にはめったに持つことを許されない堅固な志操と悟りを胸に抱いた。彼女の善と悪に対する観念ははっきりと定められて揺るぎなく、それにそむくくらいなら喜んで火あぶりの刑に処せられただろうし、もしかたら無意識のうちに、文明が信仰厚き者から火刑を奪ったことを嘆いたかも知れない。とはいえ、こうした性癖にはある種のちょっとした欠点、とりわけ有名人の名前に弱いという欠点が結びついて、この世の高貴な人々をやや過大に評価する傾向があったのである。もしも慈善市や伝道集会の際、対等の人間として彼らとともに同じ四つの壁にはさまれたなら、彼女はその素晴らしい機会に狂喜ただろう。しかしブランダマー卿が自分の家の屋根の下にいるというのはあまりにも驚くべき、予想外の恩寵で、彼女はほとんど気が動顛しまった。
Miss Joliffe focussed the card. There were only two words printed on it, only "Lord Blandamer" in the most unpretending and simple characters, but their effect was magical. Doubt and suspicion melted suddenly away, and a look of radiant surprise overspread her countenance, such as would have become a Constantine at the vision of the Labarum. She was a thoroughly unworldly woman, thinking little of the things of this life in general, and keeping her affections on that which is to come, with the constancy and realisation that is so often denied to those possessed of larger temporal means. Her views as to right and wrong were defined and inflexible; she would have gone to the stake most cheerfully rather than violate them, and unconsciously lamented perhaps that civilisation has robbed the faithful of the luxury of burning. Yet with all this were inextricably bound up certain little weaknesses among which figured a fondness for great names, and a somewhat exaggerated consideration for the lofty ones of this earth. Had she been privileged to be within the same four walls as a peer at a bazaar or missionary meeting, she would have revelled in a great opportunity; but to find Lord Blandamer under her own roof was a grace so wondrous and surprising as almost to overwhelm her.
「ブランダマー卿が!」彼女はやや落ち着きを取り戻したとき、口ごもるように言った。「ミスタ・ウエストレイの部屋が片付いいればいいんだけど。今朝、隅から隅まで掃除たんだけどね。いらっしゃるなら、あらかじめ連絡て欲しかったわ。汚れいるのをられるなんて嫌ですもの。今何をていらっしゃるの、アナスタシア。ミスタ・ウエストレイが帰るまで待つおっしゃったの」
"Lord Blandamer!" she faltered, as soon as she had collected herself a little. "I hope Mr Westray's room was tidy. I dusted it thoroughly this morning, but I wish he had given some notice of his intention to call. I should be so vexed if he found anything dusty. What is he doing, Anastasia? Did he say he would wait till Mr Westray came back?"
「ミスタ・ウエストレイにメモを書くそうよ。書くものを探しあげたわ」
"He said he would write a note for Mr Westray. I found him writing things."
「ミスタ・ウエストレイの記念インクスタンドをお出したでしょうね」
"I hope you gave his lordship Mr Westray's presentation inkstand."
「いいえ、考えもなかった。小さい黒いインクスタンドがあって、中にたっぷりインクが入ったから」
"No, I did not think of that; but there was the little black inkstand, and plenty of ink in it."
「なんてことでしょう、なんてことでしょう!」ミス・ジョウリフはこのとてつもない事態に思いをめぐらしながら言った。「誰もたことのないブランダマー卿が、とうとうカランにやってきて、今この家にいるなんて。このボンネットだけ、とっおきのと取り替えくるわ」彼女は鏡をながらそう言い足した。「それから御前様に歓迎の挨拶をて、なにか入り用の品がないかお尋ねするわ。ボンネットをたら、わたしがたった今外出から戻ったところだってすぐ分かるでしょう。さもなきゃ、さっさと挨拶にないなんて恐ろしく怠慢な女だと思われてしまう。そうよ、ボンネットをかぶっいったほうが絶対いいわ」
"Dear me, dear me!" Miss Joliffe said, ruminating on so extraordinary a position, "to think that Lord Blandamer, whom no one has ever seen, should have come to Cullerne at last, and is now in this very house. I will just change this bonnet for my Sunday one," she added, looking at herself in the glass, "and then tell his lordship how very welcome he is, and ask him if I can get anything for him. He will see at once, from my bonnet, that I have only just returned, otherwise it would appear to him very remiss of me not to have paid him my respects before. Yes, I think it is undoubtedly more fitting to appear in a bonnet."
アナスタシアは叔母がブランダマー卿に面会する思うといささかとまどいを覚えた。彼女はミス・ジョウリフの度を超した熱狂や、浴びせかけずにはいられないであろうお世辞、そして地位ある人への当然の敬意でしかないのに卑屈な追従と取られかねない賞賛のことばを思った。どういうわけかアナスタシアは自分の家族が賓客の目にできるだけ好ましく映ることを願い、一瞬、ミス・ジョウリフに、呼ばれるまではブランダマー卿に合う必要などまったくないと説得しようかと思った。しかし彼女には達観たところがあって、すぐに自分で自分の愚かしさを咎めた。ブランダマー卿がどう思おうとわたしには何の関係もないわ。お帰りになるとき、ドアを開けでもないかぎり、再び会うことなんかありない。ありふれた下宿屋やその住人のことなど、彼は一顧だにないだろうし、もしそんな詰まらぬことを考えることがあったとしても、あんなに賢い人なのだから、自分とは立場が違うことを斟酌て、叔母のことを、わざとらしさはいろいろあっても善良な女だと見抜いくれるだろう。
Anastasia was a little perturbed at the idea of her aunt's interview with Lord Blandamer. She pictured to herself Miss Joliffe's excess of zeal, the compliments which she would think it necessary to shower upon him the marked attention and homage which he might interpret as servility, though it was only intended as a proper deference to exalted rank. Anastasia was quite unaccountably anxious that the family should appear to the distinguished visitor in as favourable a light as possible, and thought for a moment of trying to persuade Miss Joliffe that there was no need for her to see Lord Blandamer at all, unless he summoned her. But she was of a philosophic temperament, and in a moment had rebuked her own folly. What could any impression of Lord Blandamer's matter to her? she would probably never see him again unless she opened the door when he went out. Why should he think anything at all about a commonplace lodging-house, and its inmates? And if such trivial matters did ever enter his thoughts, a man so clever as he would make allowance for those of a different station to himself, and would see what a good woman her aunt was in spite of any little mannerisms.
そこで彼女は抗議をずに雄々しく静かに椅子に座り、ブランダマー卿とその訪問が引き起こしたくだらない興奮などきれいさっぱり忘れ去ろうと決意て「ノーサンガー・アベイ」をもう一度開いた。
So she made no remonstrance, but sat heroically quiet in her ch